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Academic Calendar 1978-1979 



Monday, August U 
Monday, August 21- 

Saturday, August 26 
Saturday, August 26 and 

Sunday, August 27 
Monday, August 28 
Monday, September J, 
Friday, September 8 

Friday, September 22 

Friday, September 29 
Wednesday, October 11 

Thursday, October 12 and 

Friday, October 13 
Wednesday, November 1 

Friday, November 3 

Thursday, November 23- 
Sunday, November 26 
Friday, December 8 
Wednesday, December 13 
Wednesday, December 20 
Wednesday. December 27 



Monday, January 8 
Friday, January 19 

Friday, February 2 

Friday, February 9 
Tuesday, February 13 
Friday, February 23 

Monday. February 26- 

Sunday, March U 
Thursday, March 1 

Saturday, March 1 7 
Friday, March 23 

Thursday, April 12- 

Sunday, April 15 

Friday. April 27 

Saturday, April 28- 

Thursday, May 3 

Wednesday, May 2 
Friday, May U 

Monday, May 7 
Wednesday, May 9 
Saturday, May 12 
Tuesday, May 15 
Wednesday, May 16 



June-July 
June-July 



First Semester 

Last day for payment of fees for continuing students 
Arrival and orientation week for new students and new 

transfers 
Arrival of continuing students 

First day of classes 

Labor Day holiday 

Final registration for undergraduates and candidates for 
B.Arch. and B.F.A. degrees, fall semester, 5 p.m. 

Deadline for adding courses to schedule and for designating 
Pass/Fail, 5 p.m. 

Deadline for removal of Incompletes, 5 p.m. 

Last day to file college course plans with the Dean of Under- 
graduate Affairs 

Midterm recess 

Deadline for Ph.D. candidacy petitions. Office of the Dean of 

Advanced Studies and Research, 5 p.m. 
Deadline for dropping courses or converting Pass/Fail options 

to a number grade, 5 p.m. 
Thanksgiving recess 

Last day of classes 

First day of final examinations 

Last day of final examinations 

All grades due, Registrar's Office, 12 noon 

Second Semester 

First day of classes 

Final registration for undergraduates and candidates for 
B.Arch. and B.F.A. degrees, spring semester, 5 p.m. 

Deadline for adding courses to schedule and designating 
Pass/Fail, 5 p.m. 

Deadline for removal of Incompletes, 5 p.m. 

Majors Day for freshmen and sophomores 

Last day to file college course plans with the Dean of Under- 
graduate Affairs 

Midterm recess 

Deadline for Master's Degree petitions. Office of the Dean of 

Advanced Studies and Research, 5 p.m. 
Parents Day 
Deadline for dropping courses and for converting Pass/Fail 

options to a number grade, 5 p.m. 

Easter recess 
Last day of classes 

Final examinations for graduating seniors and 5th year degree 

candidates 
First day of final examinations for remaining students 
Deadline for submission of theses for spring graduation, Office 

of the Dean of Advanced Studies and Research, 12 noon 
Grades of all degree candidates due in Registrar's Office, 9 a.m. 
Last day of final examinations 
Sixty-sixth Commencement 
Deadline for filing undergraduate degree plans 
Remaining grades due. Registrar's Office, 5 p.m. 

Summer, 1979 

Rice summer program for college students 
Teaching Apprentice Session 







1976-1979 



Offices to contact for additional information: 



Mailing Address: Rice University, Post Office Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77001 
Location: 6100 South Main, Houston, Texas 
Telephone: Area Code 713, 527-8101 

Please address all correspondence to the appropriate office or department 
followed by the university mailing address given above. 



Admission, Catalogs, Applications 

Business Matters 

Career Placement, Part-time 
Employment Off Campus 

Continuing Education 

Credits, Transcripts 

Financial Aid, Scholarships, 
Part-time Employment on Campus 

Graduate Study 

Housing for Undergraduates 



Undergraduate Students, 
Undergraduate Curricula 



Office of Admissions 

109 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4036 

Office of the Cashier 

110 Allen Center; (713) 527-4946 

Placement Office 

301 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4055 

Office of Continuing Studies 
315 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4803 

Office of the Registrar 

103 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4999 

Financial Aid Office 

201 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4958 

Chairman of the Appropriate 
Department 

Office of Admissions 

109 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4036 

Dean of Undergraduate Affairs 
101 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4996 



William Marsh Rice University admits students of any race, color, and national 
or ethnic origin. 



Table of 
Contents 



The University and the Campus 1 

Administration and Staff 

Board of Governors 5 

Administration 6 

Administrative Offices 6 

College Masters 6 

Rice University Associates 7 

Corporate Associates 10 

Instructional and Research Staff 11 

Standing Committees 42 

Chairs and Lectureships 45 

Information for Undergraduates 

Degree Requirements, Majors, and Curricula 49 

Academic Regulations 60 

Admission of New Students 65 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 73 

Financial Aid 75 

Scholarships and Awards 77 

Honor Societies 82 

Student Life 82 

Information for Graduate Students 

Research Degrees 89 

Professional Degrees 92 

Cooperative Graduate Programs 95 

Admission to Graduate Study 96 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 97 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 98 

Financial Aid 100 

Graduate Student Life 100 

Courses of Instruction 

Explanation of Numbering System 103 

Accounting and Administrative Science 104 

Anthropology 110 

Architecture 114 

Art and Art History 123 



Behavioral Science 129 

Biochemistry 130 

Biology 132 

Chemistry 137 

Economics 141 

Education 146 

Engineering and Applied Science 150 

Chemical Engineering 152 

Civil Engineering 156 

Electrical Engineering 160 

Environmental Science and Engineering 168 

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 171 

English 177 

French and Italian 182 

Geology 186 

German and Russian 192 

Health and Physical Education 197 

History 200 

Legal Studies 206 

Linguistics 207 

Mathematical Sciences 208 

Mathematics 216 

Military Science 220 

The Shepherd School of Music 222 

Naval Science 230 

Philosophy 232 

Physics 235 

Political Science 239 

Psychology 245 

Religious Studies 248 

Sociology 252 

Space Physics and Astronomy 255 

Spanish, Portuguese, and Classics 259 

Index 265 



The University 
and the Campus 



Dedicated to "the advancement of letters, science, and art," Rice University 
is private, independent, nonsectarian, and coeducational. It includes among its 
academic divisions both undergraduate and graduate studies in humanities, 
social sciences, natural sciences, engineering, architecture, administrative 
sciences, and music. 

Highly talented students with diverse interests are attracted to Rice by the 
opportunities for creative learning. They encounter rewarding student-faculty 
relationships, options for individually tailored programs of study, independent 
research, cooperative activities with other institutions in the nation's fifth 
largest city, and the unique experience of residential colleges. 

The majority of Rice's 2700 undergraduate students live on campus in the 
eight residential colleges. The colleges have independent student governments, 
plan social functions, field intramural teams, and sponsor innovative academic 
courses, visiting distinguished speakers, plays, and other functions. In each 
college the college master and approximately eighteen faculty associates act 
as advisers and mentors to the students. This system provides students and 
faculty with a style of living in keeping with the tenets of fine education. 

Rice's approximately 900 graduate students work closely with faculty 
members who are eminent in their fields and conduct innovative research to 
extend the horizons of current knowledge. Graduate students live off campus. 
The Graduate Student Association organizes and funds regular social activities 
and provides graduate students with a separate organization to represent their 
interests within the university. 

A look through the archway of Lovett Hall shows even the casual visitor 
why the 300-acre Rice campus is widely acclaimed for its dignified yet casual 
beauty. Approximately forty permanent buildings are conveniently grouped 
in quadrangles under graceful live oak trees. The city's largest stadium, the 
972,000-volume Fondren Library, the Media Center, the gymnasium, the 
computer center, drama and musical presentations make Rice "behind the 
hedges" a community unto itself. Yet only three miles from downtown Houston, 
Rice students enjoy all the academic, government, business, shopping, enter- 
tainment, and cultural advantages of a major metropolitan center. 



RESIDENTIAL AREA 



^OAfr^ 




The 

Rice University 

Campus 



1. President's House 

2. Margarett Root Brown 
College 

3. Brown House 

4. Mary Gibbs Jones College 

5. Jones House 

6. Physical Plant Buildings 
Central Kitchen/ROTC 
Ryon Engineering Laboratory 
(Engineenng/Materials 
Science) 

Mechanical Laboratory 
(E ngineeringlScien ce) 
Abercrombie Engineering 
Laboratory 

Bonner Nuclear Research 
Laboratory 

12. Chemistry Building 

13. Herman Brown Hall 
(Math/Math Science ICSA 
Accounting/Administrative 
Science) 

14. }iammanHa\\( Auditorium) 

15. Space Science Building 

16. Keith -Wiess Geological 
Laboratories 

17. Anderson Biological 
Laboratories 

18. Rice Memorial Center 
(Student activities/Pub/ 
Sammy's /Campus Store and 
Bookstore/Band Hal!) 

19. Rice Chapel 



Fondren Library (Central 

Library/History) 

Anderson Hall 

(Architecture) 

Physics Laboratories 

Lovett Hall (Administrative 

offices I A dm iss ions IR ecordsl 

Religious Studies/Philosophy) 

Sewall Hall (Art /Music/ 

Social Sciences NROTC 

Education) 

Rayzor Hall (English/ 

Foreign Languages/ 

Linguistics) 

Cohen House (Faculty Club) 

Allen Center for Business 

Activities 

James A. Baker College 

Baker House 

Wiess House 

Harry C. Wiess College 

Harry C. Hanszen College 

Hanszen House 



34. Will Rice College 

35. Will Rice House 

36. Edgar Odell Lovett 
College 

37. Lovett House ' 

38. Sid W. Richardson College 

39. Richardson House 

40. Rice Museum 

41. Rice Media Center 
(Photography) 

42. Gymnasium and Autrv 
Conn(Health&PE/ 
Athletics) 

43. Owl Club Room. 



VILLAGE SHOPPING AREA 




HERMANN PARK 



I 




Administration 
and Staff ? 



Board of Governors 



Trustees 

James U. Teague, Chainnan 
Robert R. Herring, Vice Chairman 
Josephine E. Abercrombie 

Ralph S. O'Connor 

Term Members 

Harry J. Chavanne 

John L. Cox 

Miss Mary E. Johnston 



E. D. Butcher 
William H. Lane 
Theodore N. Law 



Edward W. Kelley, Jr. 
Baine P. Kerr 
Wendel D. Ley 



Alumni Governors 

Richard A. Chapman 
Walter D. Murphy 

Trustees Emeriti 

Herbert Allen 
George R. Brown 
Mrs. William P. Hobby 

Governor Advisors 

John W. Cox 
Sam S. Emison 
William S. Parish HI 
Mrs. David Hannah, Jr. 
James W. Hargrove 
Gerald D. Hines 
Carl Illig 
Jack S. Josey 
Howard B. Keck 
J. Hugh Liedtke 
J. W. McLean 
John W. Mecom 



Karl C. ten Brink 
Mrs. Sam P. Worden 



John S. Ivy 
W. A. Kirkland 
H. Malcolm Lovett 



James R. Meyers 
Stanley C. Moore 
Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 
J. Howard Rambin 
F. Fisher Reynolds 
Frank B. Ryan 
John D. Simpson 
Harry K. Smith 
Milton R. Underwood 
Talbott Wilson 
James 0. Winston, Jr. 
Benjamin N. Woodson 



Treasurer-Secretary Joseph Nalle 

Assistant Secretary D. D. Lovell 

Comptroller J. R. Persons 



6 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Administration 



President Norman Hackerman 

Provost and Vice President Frank E. Vandiver 

Vice President for External Affairs William W. Akers 

Dean of Undergraduate Affairs Katherine T. Brown 

Dean of Advanced Studies and Research John L. Margrave 

Manager of Campus Business Affairs Henry Russell Pitman 

Dean of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School 

of Administration Robert R. Sterling 

Dean of the School of Architecture 0. Jack Mitchell 

Dean of the George R. Brown 

School of Engineering Alan J. Chapman 

Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences Virgil W. Topazio 

Dean of the Shepherd School of Music Samuel Jones 

Dean of the School of Natural Sciences William E. Gordon 



Administrative Offices 



Admissions and Records Richard N. Stabell 

Affirmative Action Eva J. Lee 

Alumni Association Carolyn H. Wallace 

Athletics August F. Erfurth 

Computer Services Priscilla Huston 

Development Office Margaret S. Alsobrook 

Financial Aid G. David Hunt 

Fondren Library Richard O'Keeffe 

Food and Housing Marion 0. Hicks 

Information Services David H. Rodwell 

Personnel Mitchell 0. Sadler 

Placement Mary L. Leatherwood 

Proctor Samuel M. Carrington 

Registrar James C. Morehead, Jr. 

Secretary to the Faculty Joan Boorman 

Student Activities Bonnie C. Heliums 

University Police Department Harold R. Rhodes 



College Masters 



Baker College David Minter 

Brown College Franz R. Brotzen 

Hanszen College J. Dennis Huston 

Jones College Ronald F. Stebbings 

Lovett College John W. Freeman 

Richardson College William C. Martin 

Wiess College Stewart A. Baker 

Will Rice College Constantine Armeniades 



ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 7 



Rice University Associates 



Contributing Life Members 



Ms. Josephine E. Abercrombie 

Mr. and Mrs. K. S. Adams, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Bailey 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Baird 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Boone 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaac S. Brochstein 

Mr. and Mrs. George R. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Butcher 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Bybee 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Campbell 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Chapman 

Mr. Robert Foster Cherry 

Mrs. George S. Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cox 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Crooker, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Crosswell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd K. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Delaney 

Mrs. John de Menil 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Duncan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elkins, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam S. Emison 

Mrs. W. S. Parish 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Parish HI 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Pay 

Mrs. J. R. Prankel 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert J. Prensley 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Hall 

Mrs. Charles W. Hamilton 

Mr. and Mrs. David Hannah, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Hargrove 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Hargrove 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Heinen 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Herring 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald D. Hines 

General and Mrs. Maurice Hirsch 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Holland 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Illig 

Mr. Henry A. Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis 0. Johnson, Jr. 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Kelley, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lebbeus C. Kemp, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Baine P. Kerr 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Kirkland 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore N. Law 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Liedtke 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Malcolm Lovett 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lykes, Jr. 

Mr. John P. Lynch 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Maurice McAshan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris Masterson III 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Mellinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl D. Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Naman 

Mrs. Wheeler Nazro 

Mrs. Mary Moody Northen 

Dr. and Mr. Gustav M. O'Keiff 

Mrs. George A. Peterkin 

Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Reckling III 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Pisher Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Clive Runnells 

Mr. and Mrs. Payez Sarofim 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Irving Schweppe, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eddy C. Scurlock 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex Segall 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Shartle 

Mrs. E. Joe Shimek ' 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Simpson 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert K. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry K. Smith 

Mrs. H. Gardiner Symonds 

Mr. and Mrs. Williston B. Symonds 

Mr. Henry J. N. Taub 

Mr. and Mrs. James U. Teague 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton R. Underwood 

Dr. Damon Wells, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley West 

Mrs. Harry C. Wiess 

Mrs. Willoughby C. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. James 0. Winston, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin N. Woodson 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam P. Worden 



Life Members 



Mr. and Mrs. Joe L. Allbritton 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Leland Anderson 
Mrs. Porrest L. Andrews 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Evans Attwell 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Austin 



Mrs. James A. Baker, Jr. 

Mrs. W. Browne Baker 

Mr. Paul P. Barnhart 

Mrs. W. 0. Bartle 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond M. Bayless 



ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 



Mrs. Joe D. Beasley 

Mrs. John H. Blaffer 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Blocker 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Bravenec 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Britton 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Burrow 

Mr. George A. Butler 

Mrs. Charles L. Bybee 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Carruth 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Chavanne 

Mrs. H. Merlyn Christie 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Coleman 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Cooper 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Cox 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Decker 

Mrs. Elva Kalb Dumas 

Mrs. C. W. Duncan 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Duncan 

Mrs. Johanna A. Favrot 

Mrs. F. T. Fendley 

Mrs. Walter W. Fondren 

Mrs. Charles I. Francis 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Franzheim H 

Mr. Peter M. Frost 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. Glassell, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter Goldston 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard J. Gonzalez 

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil R. Haden 

Mrs. Karl F. Hasselmann 

Mrs. William P. Hobby 

Hon. and Mrs. William P. Hobby 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Horton 

Mrs. William V. Houston 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Hudson 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ivy 

Dr. and Mrs. Gaylord Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard M. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Josey 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard B. Keck 

Mrs. Edward W. Kelley 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Lane 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Griffith Lawhon 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Lederer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Letzerich 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Levine 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer E. Ley 

Mr. and Mrs. Wendel D. Ley 

Mr. John W. Link, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Lloyd, Jr. 

Mrs. Mason G. Lockwood 

Mr. and Mrs. Otto J. Lottman 

Mrs. F. R. Lummis 



Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H. McCullough 

Mrs. R. Thomas McDermott 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McLean 

Mrs. C. E. McWilliams 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Maginnis 

Mr. John F. Maher 

Mrs. Francis H. Maloney 

Mr. and Mrs. Whitfield H. Marshall 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Mecom 

Mr. Leopold L. Meyer 

Judge and Mrs. James R. Meyers 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Michaux 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan M. Moody 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvin C. Moore 

Mrs. Thomas W. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Moran 

Miss Elizabeth Morford 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Naylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Millard K. Neptune 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Ross Neuhaus 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon F. Neuhaus 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Peck 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Pryor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Rambin 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Randall HI 

Mrs. John T. Rather, Jr. 

Mrs. J. Newton Rayzor 

Mr. and Mrs. Jess Newton Rayzor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Riddell, Jr. 

Dr. Max Roy 

Mr. Patrick R. Rutherford, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank B. Ryan 

Mrs. James L. Shepherd, Jr. 

Mrs. Stuart Sherar 

Mr. Frank C. Smith, Jr. 

Mrs. R. E. Smith 

Mr. William A. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Mclver Streetman 

Mr. Ben Taub 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard T. Tellepsen 

Dr. and Mrs. Karl C. ten Brink 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell B. Thorstenberg 

Mr. Wash Bryan Trammell 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack T. Trotter 

Mrs. P. E. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Underwood 

Mrs. Mamie McFadden Ward 

Mrs. Joe Weingarten 



Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Wilford 
Mr. and Mrs. Talbott Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace D. Wilson 



RICE UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES 9 

Mrs. Gus S. Wortham 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jackson Wray 



Regular Members 



Mr. and Mrs. Louis K. Adler 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Lovett Baker 

Mrs. James A. Beeley 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Beeley 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Bellows 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren S. Bellows, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman A. Binz 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles M. Blair 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Blanton 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Boone 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 0. Bottler 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark W. Breeding 

Mr. and Mrs. William D. Broyles 

Dr. and Mrs. Andrew B. Bryan 

Mr. and Mrs. David F. Chapman 

Miss Mary E. Chavanne 

Rear Adm. and Mrs. R. Sperry Clarke 

Dr. and Mrs. Claude C. Cody III 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Coffee 

Miss Nina Cullinan 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Dawson 

Mrs. Marry Woodson Dennis 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Doherty, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Dore' 

Mrs. Ray L. Dudley 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Eubank, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Fadrique 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey M. Farb 

Mr. David E. Farnsworth 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Finger 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Fisher 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Fite, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. Gaylord 

Mr. and Mrs. Basil Georges 

Mr. Miles Glaser 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Franklin Glass, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne E. Glenn 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Goff 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H. Greenwood 

Mr. and Mrs. Jenard M. Gross 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex W. Head 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles B. Headrick 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Heard 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hershey 

Mrs. Jacob Henry Hess, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul N. Howell 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Hudspeth 

Mr. and Mrs. David Dillon Itz 



Mr. and Mrs. R. Graham Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Jacobs, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Joplin 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Judd 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Boyd Kilgore 

Dr. and Mrs. George F. Kirby 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred J. Knapp 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Love 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe A. McDermott, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. D.E. McMahon 

Mr. and Mrs. Don F. McMillian 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Meyer HI 

Mr. and Mrs. Pat H. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Moore, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. L Morris 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mosbacher 

Mr. and Mrs. Jon L. Mosle, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Nad 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Neilan 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Oscar Neuhaus 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward Norbeck 

Mr. John H. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Oliver 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Pearlstone, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles A. Perlitz, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Pierce, Jr. 

Mr. Taylor Ray 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Claxton Rayzor 

Mr. and Mrs. Hershel M. Rich 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat S. Rogers 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Rooke 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Sawtelle 

Mr. Kenneth Schnitzer 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben G. Sewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Hilton Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis D. Spaw, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Stude 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Sumners 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren T. Thagard HI 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. Van Wart 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Waters 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Welsh, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace S. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Wintermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Winters 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Winters 

Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Wright 

Mr. R. Scott Ziegler 



10 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Rice University Corporate Associates 



Arthur Andersen & Company 

Atlantic Richfield Company 

Baker International Corporation 

Cameron Iron Works, Inc. 

Continental Oil Company 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company 

Exxon Company, U.S.A. 

Gulf Oil Corporation 

Halliburton Company 

Houston Natural Gas Corporation 

International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation 

Monsanto Company 

Pennzoil Company 

Procter & Gamble Company 

Schlumberger, Limited 

Shell Oil Company 

Smith International, Inc. 

Tapco International 

Texaco Inc. 

Texas Eastern Corporation 

Transco Companies Inc. 



ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 11 

Instructional and Research Staff 

As of May 1, 1978 

Emeritus Faculty 

Bale, Allen M. Athletic Director Emeritus ^ 

B.S. (Rice) 1936; M.A. (Columbia) 1939 

Battista, Joseph Lloyd. Professor Emeritus of Romance 
Languages 

Certificat d'Etudes Francaise (Bordeaux) 1919; Diplome d'Etudes Supe'rieures 
(Bordeaux) 1919; B.A. (Michigan) 1920; M.A. (Washington Univerity) 1923; M.A. (Harvard) 
1929 

Bourgeois, Andre Marie Georges. Favrot Professor of French, Emeritus 
Bachelier es Lettres (Paris) 1921; Bachelier en Droit (Paris) 1923; Certifie' d'Etudes 
Supe'rieures de Lettres (Paris) 1930; M.A. (University of Texas) 1934; Docteur de 
rUniversite (Paris) 1945; Commandeur de I'Ordre des Palmes Academiques, 1971 

Bray, Hubert Evelyn. Professor Emeritus Of Mathematics and Honorary 
Associate Emeritus of Jones College 
B.A. (Tufts) 1910; M.A. (Harvard) 1916; Ph.D. (Rice) 1918 

Bryan, Andrew Bonnell. Lecturer Emeritus in Physics 
B.A. (Rice) 1918; M.A. (Rice) 1920; Ph.D (Rice) 1922 

Camden, Carroll. Professor Emeritus of English and Honorary Charter 
Associate of Hanszen College 
A.B. (Centre) 1925; Ph.D. (Iowa) 1930 

Cason, Carolyn. Lecturer Emeritus in Dietetics 
B.S. (University of Texas) 1934; M.A. (Columbia) 1939 

Franklin, Joe L., Jr. Robert A. Welch Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus 
B.S. (University of Texas) 1929; M.S. (University of Texas) 1930; Ph.D. (University of 
Texas) 1934 

Freund, (Friedrich Ernst) Max. Professor Emeritus of Germanics 
Ph.D. (Leipzig) 1902 

Fulton, James Street. Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Honorary 
Master of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Vanderbilt) 1925; M.A. (Vanderbilt) 1929; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1934 

Gallegly, Joseph S. Professor Emeritus of English 
B.A. (Rice) 1925; M.A. (Rice) 1926 

Hake, Evelyn. Lecturer Emeritus in Biology 
B.A. (Rice) 1930; M.A. (Rice) 1932 

Harsook, Arthur J. Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering 

A.B. (Nebraska Wesleyan) 1911; B.S.Ch.E. (M.I.T.) 1920; M.S. (M.I.T.) 1921 

Hermance, Gilbert Leslie. Professor Emeritus of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation 
B.S. (Oregon) 1927; M.A. (Columbia) 1930 

Hodges, Lee. Professor Emeritus of French 
B.S. (Harvard) 1930; M.A. (Rice) 1934 

Hudson, Bradford Benedict. Professor Emeritus of Psychology 
A.B. (Stanford) 1930; Ph.D. (California) 1947 -. 

Jitkoff, Andrew N. Professor Emeritus of Ru^iony " lN^^^iS^l(JMr) 

Bachelor (Prague Inst, of Tech.) 1928; Master (Prague Inst, of Tech.) 1931 



12 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

McDonald, A. P. Professor Emeritus of Engineering Graphics 

B.S. (Texas A&M) 1943 

McEnany, Michael Vincent. Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering 
and Honorary Associate of Will Rice College 
B.S.E.E. (Colorado College) 1929; M.A. (Dartmouth) 1931 

Neely, Jess Claiborne. Athletic Director Emeritus 
LL.B. (Vanderbilt) 1924 

Nettleton, Lewis L. Lecturer Emeritus in Geology 

B.S. (Idaho) 1918; M.S. (Wisconsin) 1923; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1923 

Richter, George Holmes. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 
B.A. (Rice) 1926; M.A. (Rice) 1927; Ph.D. (Rice) 1929 

Rossini, Frederick D. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.S. (Carnegie Inst.) 1925; M.S. (Carnegie Inst.) 1926; Ph.D. (California) 1928 

Shelton, Fred Vernon. Professor Emeritus of French and Honorary Charter 
Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Rice) 1926; M.A. (Rice) 1928; M.A. (Mexico) 1942; Docteur de I'Universite (Paris) 1963 

Simons, Verne Franklin. Professor Emeritus of Accounting 
A.B. (Kansas) 1923; A.M. (Kansas) 1925 

Thomas, Joe David. Professor Emeritus of English 
Ph.B. (Chicago) 1929; A.M. (Chicago) 1930 

Wadsworth, Philip A. Professor Emeritus of French 
A.B. (Yale) 1935; Ph.D. (Yale) 1939 

Williams, George Guion. Professor Emeritus of English 
B.A. (Rice) 1923: M.A. (Rice) 1925 

Welsh, Hugh Clayton. Lecturer Emeritus in Biology and Medical Adviser 

M.D. (University of Texas) 1923 

Faculty 

Adams, John Allan Stewart. Professor of Geology 

Ph.B. (Chicago) 1946; B.S. (Chicago) 1948; M.S. (Chicago) 1949, Ph.D. (Chicago) 1951 

Adams, Thomas M. Captain, U.S. Army, and Assistant Professor of Military 
Science 
B.S. (Brigham Young University) 1970 

Akers, William Walter. Professor of Chemical and Environmental 
Engineering and Vice President for External Affairs 

B.S.Ch.E. (Texas Tech) 1943; M.S.Ch.E. (University of Texas) 1944; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1950 

Alcover, Madeleine.Associate Professor of French 

Licence de Lettres Modernes (Bordeaux) 1962; Diplome d'Etudes Superieures (Bordeaux) 
1963; Doctorat de Litterature Francaise (Bordeaux) 1965 

Alfrey, Clarence P., Jr. Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering 

B.A. (Rice) 1951; M.D. (Baylor) 1955; Ph.D. (Minnesota) 1966 

Ambler, John S. Professor of Political Science and Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (Willamette) 1953; A.M. (Stanford) 1954; Certificat d'Etudes Politiques (Bordeaux) 
1955; Ph.D. (California) 1964 

Anderson, Hugh R. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Associate 
of Wiess College 
B.A. (Iowa) 1954; M.A. (Iowa) 1958; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1961 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 13 

Anderson, John B. Assistant Professor of Geology and Associate of Hanszen 
College 
B.S. (South Alabama) 1968; M.S. (New Mexico) 1970; Ph.D. (Florida State) 1972 

Ansevin, Krystyna D. Associate Professor of Biology , 

B.S. (Jagellonian) 1950; M.S. (Jagellonian) 1950; Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) 1961 

Apple, Max I. Associate Professor of English 

B.A. (Michigan) 1963; M.A. (Stanford) 1965, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1970 

Arbiter, Eric. Lecturer in Music : ■ '.^ 

B.A. (Oberlin Conservatory) 1972; M.A. (Cleveland Institute of Music) 1973 

Aresu, Bernard. Assistant Professor of French and Italian and Associate of 
Baker College 

Licence es Lettres (Universite de Montpellier) 1967; Ph.D. (Washington) 1975 

Armeniades, Constantine D. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Master 
of Will Rice College 
B.S. (Northeastern) 1961; M.S. (Case) 1967; Ph.D. (Case) 1969 

Austin, Walter James. Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E. (Rice) 1941; M.S.C.E. (Illinois) 1946; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1949 

Ave Lallemant, Hans Gerhard. Associate Professor of Geology and Associate 
of Will Rice College 
B.Sc. (Leiden) 1960; M.Sc. (Leiden) 1964; Ph.D. (Leiden) 1967 

Awapara, Jorge. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (Michigan State) 1941; M.S. (Michigan State) 1942; Ph.D. (Southern California) 1947 

Bacon, Thomas. Lecturer in Music 
B.A. (Oakland) 1975 

Badner, Carol Luce. Lecturer in Art < , . , > . , ., .. 

B.F.A. (Ohio Wesleyan) 1963; M.F.A. (Columbia) 1967 

Baker, Donald Roy. Professor of Geology and Honorary Associate of Brown 
College 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1950; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1955 

Baker, Stephen Denio. Professor of Physics 
B.S. (Duke) 1957; M.S. (Yale) 1959; Ph.D. (Yale) 1963 

Baker, Stewart A. Associate Professor of English and Master of Wiess College 
B.A. (Columbia College) 1960; M.A. (Yale) 1961; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Barker, J. R. Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education and As- 
sociate of Hanszen College 
B.S.P.E. (Rice) 1949; M.Ed. (Texas) 1965 

Bartlett, John. Adjunct Associate Professor of Health Facilities Planning 
LL.B. (Iowa) 1961; M.A. (Iowa) 1963; Ph.D. (Iowa) 1970 

Baum, Ernest Roy. Lecturer in Education 
B.A. (Trinity) 1956; M.A. (University of Texas) 1964 

Bavinger, Bill Allen. Instructor in Architecture 

B.A. (Rice) 1973; M.Arch. (Rice) 1976 

Bayazitoglu, Yildiz. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. (Middle East Tech. Univ.) 1967; M.S. (Michigan) 1969; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1974 

Bearden Frank W. Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S. (Texas Tech) 1947; M.A. (Columbia) 1949; Ed.D. (Columbia) 1954 



14 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Beatrous, Frank H., Jr. G.C. Evans Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S. (Tulane) 1972; M.S. (Tulane) 1975; Ph.D. (Tulane) 1978 

Beckmann, Herbert W. K. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Dipl. Ing. (Hannover) 1944; Dr. Ing. (Hannover) 1957 

Bedient, Philip B. Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and 
Associate of Lovett College 
B.S. (Florida) 1969; M.S. (Florida) 1972; Ph.D. (Florida) 1975 

Bell, Philip W. Professor of Administrative Science and Associate of Lovett 
College 
B.A. (Princeton) 1947; M.A. (California, Berkeley) 1949; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1954 

Bell, Robert L., Jr. Adjunct Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (Texas Southern) 1953; M.A. (University of Texas) 1955; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 
1961 

Bencivenga, Ermanno. Andrew W. Mellon Instructor in Philosophy 
B.A. (University of Milan) 1972; Ph.D. (University of Toronto) 1977 

Benjamin, Don Carlos, Jr. Lecturer in Religious Studies 

B.A. (St. Bonaventure University) 1964; M.A. (Catholic University) 1968 

Berthier, Anne Marie Franeoise. Visiting Associate Professor of 
Mathematics 
Diplome d'Estudes (Paris) 1972; Superieures de Philosophie (Paris) 1973; Ph.D. (Paris) 1975 

Besen, Stanley M. Professor of Economics 

B.B.A. (City College of New York) 1958; M.A. (Yale) 1960; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Bible, Frances L. Lecturer in Music 

Artists Diploma in Singing (Juilliard) 1942; Graduate Diploma in Voice (Juilliard) 1947 

Billups, W. Edward. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Will 
Rice College 

B.S. (Marshall) 1961; M.S. (Marshall) 1965; Ph.D. (Penn State) 1970 

Blackburn, James B. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.A. (University of Texas) 1969; J.D. (University of Texas Law School) 1972; M.S. (Rice) 
1974 

Bland, Robert Lester. Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education 
and Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Central Washington) 1953; M.A. (Columbia) 1954 

Blattner, Meera M. Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences and 
Associate of Richardson College 
B.A. (Chicago) 1952; M.S. (Southern California) 1966; Ph.D. (U.C.L.A.) 1973 

Bochner, Salomon. Edgar Odell Lovett Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D. (Berlin) 1921 

Boorman, Joan -Jlea. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and 
Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (N.Y.U.) 19^; M.A. (Houston) 1964; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1970 

Bordelon, Cassius B., Jr. Lecturer in Health and Physical Education 
B.S. (Louisiana) 1964; Ph.D. (Baylor College of Medicine) 1972 

Boterf, Chester Arthur. Associate Professor of Art and Associate of Will 
Rice College 
B.A. (Kansas University) 1959; M.F.A. (Columbia) 1965 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 15 

Bourne, Henry Clarke, Jr. Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Honorary Associate of Baker College 
S.B. (M.I.T.) 1947; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1948; Sc.D. (M.I.T.) 1952 

Bowen, Ray M. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical 
Sciences and Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. (Texas A&M) 1958; M.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1959; Ph.D. (Texas A&M) 1961 

Brady, David William. Lecturer in Political Science and Associate of Jones 
College 
B.S. (Western Illinois) 1963; M.A. (Univ. of Iowa) 1963; Ph.D. (Univ. of Iowa) 1970 

Brady, Patrick. Professor of French 

B.A. (Sydney) 1956; Docteur de i'Universite' (Paris) 1961 

Brelsford, John W., Jr. Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (Texas Christian) 1960; M.A. (Texas Christian) 1961; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1965 

Brody, Baruch A. Professor of Philosophy and Administrative Science and 
Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Brooklyn) 1962; M.A. (Princeton) 1965; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1967 

Brooks, Philip R. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Lovett College 

B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1960; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1964 

Brotzen, Franz Richard. Professor of Materials Science, Master of Brown 
College, and Honorary Associate of Jones College 
B.S. (Case) 1950; M.S. (Case) 1953; Ph.D. (Case) 1954 

Brown, Barry W. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.S. (Chicago) 1959; M.S. (California) 1961; Ph.D. (California) 1963 

Brown, Carradean L. Lieutenant (JG), U.S. Navy, and Assistant Professor 
of Naval Science 
B.A. (South Carolina) 1972 

Brown, Christopher J. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.A. (Yale) 1963; M.Arch. (Pennsylvania) 1969; M. City Planning (Pennsylvania) 1970 

Brown, Katherine Tsanoff. Professor of Art History and Dean of Under- 
graduate Affairs 
B.A. (Rice) 1938; M.F.A. (Cornell) 1940 

Brown, Richard S. Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.E. (Temple University) 1969; M.M. (Catholic University of America) 1971 

Burnett, Sarah A. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Associate of Jones 
College 
B.S. (Memphis State) 1966; M.S. (Tulane) 1970; Ph.D. (Tulane) 1972 

Burrus, C. Sidney. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Honorary 
Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Rice) 1958; B.S.E.E. (Rice) 1958; M.S. (Rice) 1960; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1965 

Bush, George. Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science 
B.A. (Yale) 1948 

Butler, Richard V. Assistant Professor of Economics and Associate of Lovett 
College 
B.A. (Pomona) 1967; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1968; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1977 

Calderon, Calixto P. Visiting Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Licenciado en Ma^ematicas (Buenos Aires) 1965; Doctor en Matematicas (Buenos Aires) 
1969 



16 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Calfee, Richard V. Adjunct Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering 

B.S. (Texas. Arlington) 1968; M.S. (Texas, Arlington) 1970; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1975 

Callahan, Mercedes V. Assistant Professor of Spanish and Associate of 
Richardson College 

Bachiilerato (Chile) 1946; M.A. (Houston) 1969 

Camfield, William A. Professor of Art History and Associate of Jones College 
A.B. (Princeton) 1957; M.A. (Yale) 1961; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Cameron, Douglas M. Andrew W. Mellon Instructor in Spanish and Associate 
of Brown College 
B.A. (Havard) 1966 

Campbell, James Wayne. Professor of Biology 

B.S. (Southwest Missouri) 1953; M.S. (Illinois) 1955; Ph.D. (Oklahoma) 1958 

Campise, James A. Lecturer in Mathematical Sciences 
B.S.E.E. (Rice) 1950; M.S.I.E. (Houston) 1961 

Cannady, William Tillman. Professor of Architecture 
B.Arch. (Berkeley) 1961; M.Arch. (Harvard) 1962 

Cardus, David. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A., B.Sc. (U. of Montpellier, France) 1942; M.D. (Barcelona Medical School) 1949 

Carr, C. Reed. Instructor in Health and Physical Education and Associate of 
Will Rice College 
B.S. (Brigham Young) 1972; M.S. (Brigham Young) 1973 

Carrara, John D., Jr. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.S. (Christian Brothers College) 1971; M.S. (University of Texas) 1972 

Carrington, Samuel M. Associate Professor of French and Proctor 

A.B. (North Carolina) 1960; M.A. (North Carolina) 1962; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1965 

Casbarian, John Joseph. Assistant Professor of Architecture and Associate 
of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Rice) 1969; M.F.A. (California Inst, of the Arts) 1971; B.Arch. (Rice) 1972 

Casey, Richard Edward. Associate Professor of Geology 

A.B. (San Diego State) 1960; Ph.D. (Southern California) 1966 

Castaneda, James A. Professor of Spanish and Honorary Associate of Will 
Rice College 
B.A. (Drew) 1954; M.A. (Yale) 1955; Ph.D. (Yale) 1958 

Caudill, William W. Adjunct Professor of Architecture 

B.Arch. (Oklahoma State) 1937; M.Arch. (M.I.T.) 1939 

Cech, Irina. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architecture 

Masters, Engineering (Moscow) 1961; Ph.D. (Univ. of Texas School of Public Health) 1973 

Chambers, Leslie A. Adjunct Professor of Environmental Science 
B.S. (Texas Christian) 1927; M.S. (Texas Christian) 1928; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1930 

Chamberlain, Joseph W. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

A.B. (Missouri) 1948; A.M. (Missouri) 1949; M.S. (Michigan) 1951; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1952 

Chang, Donald C. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S. (Taiwan) 1965; M.A. (Rice) 1967; Ph.D. (Rice) 1970 

Chapman, Alan Jesse. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Dean of the 
George R. Brown School of Engineering 
B.S.M.E. (Rice) 1945; M.S. (Colorado) 1949; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1953 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 17 

Characklis, William G. Professor of Environmental Engineering 

B.E.S. (Johns Hopkins) 1964; M.S.Ch.E. (Toledo) 1967; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1970 
Cheatham, John Bane, Jr. Professor Mechanical Engineering 

B.S. (S.M.U.) 1948; M.S. (S.M.U.) 1953; Ph.D. (Rice) 1960 

Chimoskey, John E. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering 

M.D. (Michigan) 1963 

Citron, Mareia J. Assistant Professor of Music and Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (Brooklyn) 1966; M.A. (North Carolina) 1970; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1971 

Clark, Howard Charles, Jr. Associate Professor of Geology and Associate of 
Baker College 
B.S. (Oklahoma) 1959; M.A. (Stanford) 1965; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1966 

Clark, John W., Jr. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Asso- 
ciate of Lovett College 
B.S. (Christian Brothers) 1962; M.S. (Case) 1965; Ph.D. (Case) 1967 

Clark, Susan Louise. Associate Professor of German and Associate of Baker 
College 
B.A. (Mount Union) 1969; M.A. (Rutgers) 1972; Ph.D. (Rutgers) 1973 

Clarke, Robert W. Associate Professor of Accounting and Associate of Brown 
College 
B.S. (Syracuse) 1961; M.B.A. (Syracuse) 1962; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1967 

Class, Calvin Miller. Professor of Physics 

A.B. (Johns Hopkins) 1943; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1951 

Clayton, Donald Delbert. Andrew Hays Buchanan Professor of Astrophysics 
in the Departments of Space Physics and Astronomy and of Physics 
B.S. (S.M.U.) 1956; M.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1959; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1962 

Cloutier, Paul A. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Associate of 
Richardson College 

B.S. (Southwestern Louisiana) 1964; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 , '* "'" 

Colaco, Joseph P. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.S. (Bombay) 1960; M.S. (Illinois) 1962; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1965 

Cooper, Joseph. Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and of 
Administrative Science 
B.A. (Harvard) 1955; M.A. (Harvard) 1959; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1961 

Cooper, Paul. Professor of Music and Composer-in-Residence 

B.Mus. and B.A. (Southern California) 1950; M.A. (Southern California) 1953; D.M.A. 
(Southern California) 1956 

Copeland, James E. Associate Professor of German and Linguistics 
B.A. (Colorado) 1961; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1965 

Crane, David A. Professor of Architecture 

B.S. (Georgia Inst, of Tech.) 1950; B. Arch. (Georgia Inst, of Tech.) 1950; Master of City 
Planning (Harvard) 1952 

Crouse, Wayne T. Associate Professor of Music, The Shepherd Quartet 
Soloist Diploma (Juilliard) 1951 

Curl, Robert Floyd, Jr. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (Rice) 1954; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1957 



18 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Curtis, Morton L. W. L. Moody, Jr., Professor of Mathematics and Associate of 
Brown College 

B.S. (Texas A&I) 1943; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1951 

Cushman, Richard D. Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Resident 
Associate of Hanszen College 
A.B. (Cornell) 1965; M.A. (Cornell) 1969; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1970 

Cuthbertson, Gilbert Morris. Professor of Political Science and Resident 
Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Kansas) 1959; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1963 

Dadok, Jiri. G. C. Evans Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S. (Carnegie Mellon) 1972; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1976 

Daichman, Graciela S. Lecturer in Spanish and Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (Buenos Aires) 1954; M.A. (Rice) 1975 

Davidson, F. Chandler. Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A. (University of Texas) 1961; M.A. (Princeton) 1966; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1969 

Davis, Philip W. Associate Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics 
B.A. (University of Texas) 1961; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1965 

Davis, Sam H., Jr. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Mathematical 
Sciences and Associate of Richardson College 
B.A. (Rice) 1952; B.S.Ch.E. (Rice) 1953; Sc.D. (M.I.T.) 1957 

Deans, Harry Alexander. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate 
of Brown College 
B.A. (Rice) 1953; B.S.Ch.E. (Rice) 1954; M.S.Ch.E. (Rice) 1956; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1960 

DeBremaecker, Jean-Claude. Professor of Geology and Associate of Jones 
College 
Ingenieur Civil des Mines (Louvian) 1948; M.S. (Louisiana State) 1950; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1952 

Deck, Warren. Lecturer in Music 

de Figueiredo, Rui J. P. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathematical 
Sciences and Associate of Hanszen College 
S.B. (M.I.T.) 1950; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1952; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1959 

DeSantis, Albert A., Jr. Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, and Assistant Professor 
of Naval Science and Associate of Will Rice College 
B.S. (California State) 1969; M.A. (Villanova) 1973 

Dessler, Alexander J. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Asso- 
ciate of Wiess College 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1952; Ph.D. (Duke) 1956 

Dipboye, Robert. Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A. (Baylor) 1968; M.A. (Purdue) 1969; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1973 

Disch, James George. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
and Associate of Baker College 
B.S. (Houston) 1969; M.Ed. (Houston) 1970; P.E.D. (Indiana) 1973 

Dix, Robert H. Professor of Political Science and Associate of Baker College 
B.A. (Harvard) 1951; M.A. (Harvard) 1953; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1962 

Dodds, Stanley A. Assistant Professor of Physics and Associate of Wiess 
College 
B.A. (Harvey Mudd) 1968; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1975 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 19 

Donoho, Paul Leighton. Professor of Physics 
B.A. (Rice) 1952; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1958 

Doody, Terrence Arthur. Associate Professor of English and Associate of Will 
Rice College 
A.B. (Providence) 1965; M.A. (Cornell) 1969; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1970 

Doran, Charles Francis. Professor of Political Science and Administrative 
Science and Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (Harvard) 1964; M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1966; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1969 

Dorfman, Peter W. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Associate of Baker 
College 
B.A. (Western Reserve) 1967; M.A. (Maryland) 1970; Ph.D. (Maryland) 1972 

Doughtie, Edward Orth. Associate Professor of English 
A.B. (Duke) 1958; A.M. (Harvard) 1960; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1964 

Douglass, H. Robert. Adjunct Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.Arch. (Nebraska) 1963; M.Arch. (Minnesota) 1966 

Dowden, Wilfred Sellers. Professor of English and Associate of Baker College 
B.A. (Vanderbilt) 1939; M.A. (Vanderbilt) 1940; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1949 

Downs, Thomas D. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.S. (Western Michigan) 1960; M.P.H. (Michigan) 1962; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1965 

Drew, Katherine Fischer. Professor of History 
B.A. (Rice) 1944; M.A. (Rice) 1945; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1950 

Driskill, Linda P. Assistant Professor of English and Administrative Science 
and Director of Continuing Studies 
B.A. (Rice) 1961; M.A. (Rice) 1968; Ph.D. (Rice) 1970 

Duck, Ian. Professor of Physics 

B.S. (Queen's, Ontario) 1955; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech. ) 1961 

Duffy, Robert E. Captain, U.S. Army, and Assistant Professor of Military 
Science 
B.S. (Cameron College) 1972; M.S. (Southern California) 1975 

Dufour, Reginald James. Assistant Professor of Space Physics and Astron- 
omy and Resident Associate of Lovett College 
B.S. (Louisiana) 1970; M.S. (Wisconsin) 1971; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1974 

Duke, Reese D. Lecturer in Education and Director of Student Teaching 

B.S. (Ouachita) 1950; M.Ed. (University of Texas) 1954; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1956 

Dunne, Carrin. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 
B.A. (St. Thomas) 1955; M.A. (Notre Dame) 1965; Ph.D. (Notre Dame) 1970 

Dunning, Frank Barry. Associate Professor of Physics and of Space Physics 
and Astronomy and Associate of Jones College 
B.Sc. (University College, London) 1966; Ph.D. (University College, London) 1969 

Dyer, James C. IV. Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S.B.A. (Rockhurst College) 1970; M.S. (Kansas) 1971 

Dyson, Derek C. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate of Will 
Rice College 
B.A. (Cambridge) 1955; Ph.D. (London) 1966 

Eaker, Helen Lanneau. Lecturer in Classics and Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (North Carolina) 1944; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1955 



20 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Edwards, Edgar Owen. Henry Gardiner Symonds Professor of Administra- 
tive Science 

A.B. (Washington and Jefferson) 1947; M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1949; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
1951 

Eggert, Allen W. Lecturer in Health and Physical Education 

B.S. (Rice) 1963; M.A. (California Western) 1967 

Eifler, Margret. Associate Professor of German 
M.A. (Berkeley) 1964; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1969 

Elliott, Douglas G. Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S.Ch.E. (Oregon State) 1964; M.S.Ch.E. (Houston) 1969; Ph.D. (Houston) 1971 

Ellison Paul Van Horn. Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.E. (Eastern New Mexico) 1965; M.M. (Northwestern) 1966 

Engel, Paul S. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. (U.C.L.A.) 1964; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1968 

Estle, Thomas L. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (Rice) 1953; M.S. (Illinois) 1954; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1957 

Ettelson, Meryl. Lecturer in Music 

B.Mus. (Indiana) 1961; M.M. (Indiana) 1963 
Evans, Elinor Lucile. Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (Oklahoma State) 1938; M.F.A. (Yale) 1954 

Fegan, Howard D. G.C. Evans Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A. (Oxford) 1973; M.A. (Oxford) 1977; M.Sc. (Oxford) 1977; D.Phil. (Oxford) 1977 

Feustel, Edward A. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Com- 
puter Science 
B.S.E.E. (M.I.T) 1964; M.S.E.E. (M.I.T) 1964; M.A. (Princeton) 1966; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1*967 

Few, Arthur A., Jr. Associate Professor of Space Physics and Environmental 
Science and Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. (Southwestern) 1962; M.B.S. (Colorado) 1965; Ph.D. (Rice) 1969 

Fisher, Frank M., Jr. Professor of Biology 

B.A. (Hanover) 1953; M.S. (Purdue) 1958; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1961 

Fisher, Gary Duane. Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S. (University of Texas) 1957; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1965 

Fliegel, Raphael N. Associate Professor of Music, The Shepherd Quartet, and 
Associate of Hanszen College 

Forthofer, Ronald N. Adjunct Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (Dayton) 1966; M.S. (North Carolina) 1968; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1970 

France, Newell Edwin. Adjunct Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.S. (Northwestern) 1953; M.S. (Northwestern) 1955 

Frankowski, Ralph F. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (DePaul) 1957; M.S. (DePaul) 1959; M.P.H. (Michigan) 1962; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1967 

Freeman, John W. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Master of 
Lovett College 
B.S. (Beloit) 1957; M.S. (Iowa) 1961; Ph.D. (Iowa) 1963 

Freeman, Thomas F. Lecturer in Religious Studies 

A.B. (Virginia Union) 1939; B.D. (Andover Newton) 1942; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1948 

Friedlander, Lee. Andrew W. Mellon Visiting Professor of Art 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 21 

Fukuyama, Tohru. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. (Nagoya. Japan) 1971; M.A. (Nagoya, Japan) 1973; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1977 

Garcia, Charles Albert. Adjunct Instructor in Bioengineering 

A.A. (Florida) 1964; M.D. (Tulane Medical School) 1973 

Garside, Charles, Jr. Professor of History and Associate of Baker College 

A.B. (Princeton) 1950; M.A. (Columbia) 1951; Ph.D. (Yale) 1957 

Gehan, Edmund A. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. (Manhattan) 1951; M.S. (North Carolina State) 1953; Ph.D. (North Carolina State) 1957 

Gessell, Thomas F. Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science 

B.S. (San Diego State) 1965; M.S. (Tennessee) 1968; Ph.D. (Tennessee) 1971 

Ghazzley, Osman I. Lecturer in Civil Engineering 

B.S. (Cairo) 1958; M.S. (University of Texas) 1963; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1966 

Giannoni, Carlo B. Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Jones 
College 
B.A. (Chicago) 1961; M.A. (Pittsburgh) 1963; Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) 1966 

Glantz, Raymon M. Associate Professorof Biology and of Electrical Engineer- 
ing and Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (C.U.N.Y.) 1963; M.S. (Syracuse) 1964; Ph.D. (Syracuse) 1966 '. , ■■ ,"» ' 

Glass, Graham P. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc. (Birmingham) I960; Ph.D. (Cambridge) 1963 - » • . .. 

Gordon, Chad. Professor of Sociology 

B.S. (U.C.L.A.) 1957; M.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1962; Ph.D. (U.C.L.A.) 1963 

Gordon, William E. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Space Physics 
and Astronomy, Dean of the School of Natural Sciences, and Associate of 
Baker College 
B.A. (Montclair) 1939; M.A. (Montclair) 1942; M.S. (New York) 1946; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1953 

Gorry, G. Anthony. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.E. (Yale) 1962; M.S. (California, Berkeley) 1963; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1967 

Gottschalk, Arthur W. Instructor in Music and Associate of Wiess College 
B.A. (Michigan) 1974; M.A. (Michigan) 1975 

Gow, David John. Assistant Professor of Political Science and Associate of 
Will Rice College 
B.A. (University of Sydney) 1972; Ph.D. (University of Hawaii) 1977 

Greanias, George C. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science and Asso- 
ciate of Wiess College 
B.A. (Rice) 1970; J.D. (Harvard) 1973 

Grob, Alan. Professor of English and Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Utica) 1952; M.A. (Wisconsin) 1957; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1961 

Gruber, Ira Dempsey. Professor of History and Associate of Hanszen College 

A.B. (Duke) 1955; M.A. (Duke) 1959; Ph.D. (Duke) 1961 

Guderian, Mack D. Lecturer in Music 

B.M.Ed. (Texas Christian) 1966; M.Ed. (North Texas State) 1972 

Hacker, Carl S. Adjunct Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.S. (William & Mary) 1963; Ph.D. (Rice) 1968 

Hackerman, Norman. Professor of Chemistry and President 

A.B. (Johns Hopkins) 1932; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1935 



22 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Hale, Elton Bernard. Professor of Accounting 

B.S. (Southwest Texas) 1937; M.A. (Southwest Texas) 1941; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1948 

Hampton, Gary W. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education and 
Associate of Richardson College 
B.S. (North Texas) 1966; M.S. (North Texas) 1969; Ed.D. (Houston) 1976 

Hannon, James P. Associate Professor of Physics and Associate of Wiess 
College 
B.A. (Rice) 1962; M.A. (Rice) 1965; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

Hanson, Alice Marie. Instructor in Music 

B.A. (Wells College) 1971; M.M. (Univ. of Illinois) 1973 

Harcombe, Paul A. Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S. (Michigan State) 1967; Ph.D. (Yale) 1972 
Harkins, Carl Girvin. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Materials Science 

B.A. (McMurry) 1960; M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1962; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1964 

Harris, Scott A. Instructor of Political Science and Associate of Will Rice 
College 
B.A. (Wyoming) 1970; M.A. (Wisconsin) 1971 

Harvey, F. Reese. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1963; M.A. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1963; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1966 

Haskell, Thomas L. Associate Professor of History and Associate of Richard- 
son College 
B.A. (Princeton) 1961; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1973 

Haugh, Richard S. Visiting Associate Professor of Religious Studies 

B.A. (University of Massachusetts) 1965; M.A. (Andover Newton) 1968; Ph.D. (Fordharn) 1973 

Havens, Neil. Professor of Drama and Honorary Associate of Jones College 
B.A. (Rice) 1956;JVI.A. (Indiana) 1959 

Hayes, Edward F. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (Rochester) 1963; M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1965; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1966 

Haymes, Robert C. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Associate 
of Baker College 
B.A. (N.Y.U.) 1952; M.S. (N.Y.U.) 1953; Ph.D. (N.Y.U.) 1959 

Hazlewood, Carlton F. Adjunct Professor of Biophysics 

B.S. (Texas A&M) 1957; Ph.D. (Tennessee) 1962 

Heliums, Jesse David. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate of 
Wiess College 

B.S.Ch.E. (University of Texas) 1950; M.S.Ch.E. (University of Texas) 1958; Ph.D. (Michi- 
gan) 1961 

Hempel, John. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (Utah) 1957; M.S. (Wisconsin) 1959; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1962 

Herson, Jay H. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.B.A. (C.C.N. Y.) 1964; M.S. (Rutgers) 1966; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1971 

Heymann, Dieter. Professor of Geology and of Space Physics and Astronomy 
Ph.D. (Amsterdam) 1958 

Higginbotham, Sanford Wilson. Professor of History 
B.A. (Rice) 1934; M.A. (L.S.U.) 1941; Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1949 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 23 

Hightower, Joe W. Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (Harding) 1959: M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1961; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1963 

Hill, Thomas W. Assistant Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.A. (Rice) 1967; M.A. (Rice) 1971; Ph.D. (Rice) 1973 

Hirschberg, Daniel S. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.E. (City College of New York) 1971; M.A.. M.S.E. (Princeton) 1973; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1975 

Hole, Frank. Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (Cornell College) 1953; M.A. (Chicago) 1958; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1961 

Holloway, Clyde. Professor of Music 

B.A. (Oklahoma) 1957; M.A. (Oklahoma) 1959; Ph.D. (Union Theological Seminary) 1974 

Holt, Edward Chester, Jr. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Asso- 
ciate of Richardson College 
S.B. (M.I.T.) 1945; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1947; Ph.D. (Penn. State) 1956 

Howell, William C. Professor of Psychology and Administrative Science 
B.A. (Virginia) 1954; M.A. (Virginia) 1956; Ph.D. (Virginia) 1958 

Hsi, Bartholomew P. Adjunct Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
M.A. (Minnesota) 1962; Ph.D. (Minnesota) 1964 

Huang, Huey W. Associate Professor of Physics 
B.Sc. (Taiwan) 1962; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1967 

Huberman, Brian. Lecturer in Art and Art History ' ' 

Huddle, Donald L. Professor of Economics and Associate of Brown College 

B.S. (U.C.L.A.) 1959; M.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1960; Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 1964 

Hudspeth, Chalmers Mac. Lecturer in Government and Community Asso- 
ciate of Wiess College 
B.A. (Rice) 1940; J.D. (University of Texas) 1946 

Huston, J. Dennis. Associate Professor of English and Master of Hanszen 

College 

B.A. (Wesleyan) 1961; M.A. (Yale) 1964; Ph.D. (Yale) 1966 
Hyman, Harold M. William P. Hobby Professor of History and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1948; M.A. (Columbia) 1950; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1952 
Isle, Walter Whitfield. Professor of English and Associate of Brown College 

A.B. (Harvard) 1955; M.A. (Michigan) 1957; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1961 

Jackson, Roy. Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.A. (Cambridge) 1955; M.A. (Cambridge) 1958; D.Sc. (Edinburgh) 1968 

Jaco, William H. Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (Fairmont) 1962; M.A. (Penn. State) 1964; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1968 

Jansson, Birger. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.A. (Stockholm) 1946; Ph.D. (Stockholm) 1965 

Johnson, Don Herrick. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Associate of Will Rice College 
S.B. (M.I.T.) 1970; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1970; E.E. (M.I.T.) 1971; Ph.E. (M.I.T.) 1974 

Johnson, Lawrence Todd. Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.S. (Arizona State) 1964; M.B.A. (Michigan) 1965; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1972 

Johnston, Dennis A. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.S. (Arlington) 1965; M.A. (University of Texas) 1966; Ph.D. (Texas Tech) 1971 



24 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Jones, B. Frank. Noah Harding Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. (Rice) 1958; Ph.D. (Rice) 1961 

Jones, Roy G. Associate Professor of Russian and of Linguistics 

B.A. (East Texas) 1954; M.A. (East Texas) 1954; Pii.D. (University of Texas) 1965 

Jones, Samuel. Professor of Music, Dean of the Shepherd School of Music, and 
Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (Miilsaps) 1957; M.A. (Eastman Sciiool of Music) 1958; Ph.D. (Eastman School of 
Music) 1960 

Jump, J. Robert. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Associate 
of Will Rice College 
B.S. (Cincinnati) 1960; M.S. (Cincinnati) 1962; M.S. (Michigan) 1965; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1968 

Kapadia, Asha Seth. Adjunct Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.A. (Delhi Univ.) 1957; M.A. (Delhi Univ.) 1959; M.S. (M.I.T.) 1965; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1969 

Kauffmann, Robert Lane. Instructor of Spanish and Associate of Hanszen 
College 
B.A. (Princeton) 1970 

Kazakos, Panayota P. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Associate of Brown College 

B.S. (Natl. Tech. Univ., Athens) 1968; M.S. (Princeton) 1970; Ph.D. (Southern California) 
1972 

Kelber, Werner H. Associate Professor of Religious Studies 

M. Theology (Princeton Theological Seminary) 1963; M.A. (Chicago) 1967; Ph.D. (Chicago) 
1970 

Kelly, William A., Jr. Assistant Professor of Economics and Associate of Jones 
College 
B.A. (Rice) 1969; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1976 

Kennedy, Kenneth W., Jr. Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences and 
Associate of Jones College 
B.A. (Rice) 1967; M.S. (N.Y.U.) 1969; Ph.D. (N.Y.U.) 1971 

Kerner, Charles Henry. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.Arch. (Michigan) 1948 

Kilpatrick, John Edgar. Professor of Chemistry and Mathematical Sciences 
B.A. (Stephen F. Austin) 1940; A.M. (Kansas) 1942; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1945 

Kim, Dae Mann. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S. (Seoul National) 1960; M.S. (Yale) 1965; Ph.D. (Yale) 1967 

Kiperman, Anita. Lecturer in Spanish 

B.A. (Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires) 1957; M.A. (University of Houston) 1971 

Klineberg, Stephen L. Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate of 
Lovett College 
B.A. (Haverford) 1961; M.A. (Paris) 1963; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1966 

Kobayashi, Riki. Louis Calder Professor of Chemical Engineering and Asso- 
ciate of Will Rice College 
B.S. Ch.E. (Rice) 1944; M.S.E.Ch.E. (Michigan) 1947; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1951 

Koehler, H. Richard. Assistant Professor of Music, Assistant to the Dean of the 
Shepherd School of Music, Conductor of the Rice Chorale, and Associate 
of Lovett College 
B.Mus. (Puget Sound) 1959; M.Mus. (Puget Sound) 1967; Ph.D. (Oregon) 1974 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 25 

Kolenda, Konstantin. Carolyn and Fred McManis Professor of Philosophy and 
Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Rice) 1950; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1953 

Krahl, Nat Wetzel. Professor of Civil Engineering and of Architecture 

B.A. (Rice) 1942; B.S.C.E. (Rice) 1943; M.S. (Illinois) 1950; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1963 

Krawitz, Aaron D. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
and Materials Science 
B.S. (Northwestern) 1966; Ph.D. (Northwestern) 1972 

Krzyzaniak, Marian. Henry S. Fox, Sr., Professor of Economics 
M.Econ. & Pol. Sci. (Poznan) 1932; M.A. (Alberta) 1954; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1959 

Kulstad, Mark A. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Hanszen 
College 
B.A. (Macalester College) 1969; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1975 

Kurtzman, Jeffrey G. Associate Professor of Music and Associate of Richard- 
son College 

B.M. (Colorado) 1963; M.M. (Illinois) 1967; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1972 

Lairson, David Robert. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. (Kentucky) 1970; M.A. (Kentucky) 1975; Ph.D. (Kentucky) 1975 

Lane, David M. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (Clark) 1971; M.A. (Tufts) 1973 '■' ' ' ' '' ' •'■' 

Lane, Neal F. Professor of Physics and of Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. (Oklahoma) 1960; M.S. (Oklahoma) 1962; Ph.D. (Oklahoma) 1964 

Leal de Martinez, Maria Teresa. Associate Professor of Portuguese and 
Spanish and Resident Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Rio de Janeiro) 1946; Licenciatura in Romance Lan- 
guages (Rio de Janeiro) 1946; Ph.D. (Brasil) 1963 

Lecuyer, Maurice Antoine. Professor of French 

Baccalaureat es Lettres (Paris) 1937; Licence es Lettres (Paris) 1943; Diplome d'Etudes 
Superieures (Paris) 1944; Ph.D. (Yale) 1954 

Lee, Eva Jean. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education, Director 

of Equal Employment Opportunity Programs, and Resident Associate of 

Jones College 

B.S. (North Texas) 1962; M.Ed. (Sam Houston) 1967; Ed.D. (Louisiana State) 1974 
Leeds, J. Venn, Jr. Professor of Electrical and Environmental Engineering 

B.A. (Rice) 1955; B.S.E.E. (Rice) 1956; M.S.E.E. (Pittsburgh) 1960; Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) 1963; 

J.D. (Houston) 1972 

Leeman, William P. Assistant Professor of Geology and Associate of Will Rice 

College 

B.A. (Rice) 1967: M.A. (Rice) 1969; Ph.D. (Oregon) 1974 
Leland, Thomas W., Jr. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate of 

Jones College 

B.S. (Texas A&M) 1947; M.S.E. (Michigan) 1949; Ph.D. (Texas) 1954 

Lert, Richard J. Adjunct Professor of Music 

D.Mus. (Vienna) 1908 

Levin, Donald Norman. Professor of Classics 

A.B. (Cornell) 1949; A.M. (Cornell) 1952; A.M. (Harvard) 1954; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1957 

Lewis, Edward Sheldon. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (Berkeley) 1940; M.A. (Harvard) 1947; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1947 



26 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Linville, Jack. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.A. (East Tennessee); M. City Planning (Georgia Tech) 

Loevinsohn, Ernest. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Brown 
Collge 
B.A. (McGili) 1972 

Loewenheim, Francis Lippmann. Professor of History 

A.B. (Cincinnati) 1947: A.M. (Cincinnati) 1948; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1952 

Long, Elizabeth. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A. (Stanford) 1966; M.A. (Brandeis) 1974; Ph.D. (Brandeis) 1978 

Lord, Tom F. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.A. (S.M.U.) 1960; B.D. (Yale) 1960: M.A. (Yale) 1965 

Lovesey, Stephen W. Visiting Professor of Physics 
B.Sc. (Manchester) 1965: Ph.D. (Oxford) 1967 

Low, Frank J. Adjunct Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. (Yale) 1955; M.A. (Rice) 1957: Ph.D. (Rice) 1959 

Lucas, Timothy S. Lecturer in Accounting 

B.A. (Rice) 1969; B.S. (Rice) 1969; M.Acct. (Rice) 1976 

Lutes, Loren D. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and of Mathematical 
Sciences and Associate of Baker College 
B.Sc. (Nebraska) 1960: M.Sc. (Nebraska) 1961; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1967 

Lynch, Edward C. Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering 
A.B. (Washington) 1953; M.D. (Washington) 1956 

Marcus, George Emanuel. Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Associate 
of Richardson College 
B.A. (Yale) 1968: Ph.D. (Harvard) 1975 

Margrave, John Lee. Professor of Chemistry and Dean of Advanced Studies 
and Research 

B.S. (Kansas) 1948; Ph.D. (Kansas) 1950 

Martin, R. Russell. Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering 

A.B. (Yale) 1956; M.D. (Medical College of Georgia) 1960 

Martin, William C. Associate Professor of Sociology and Master of Richardson 
College 
A.M. (Abilene Christian) 1960; S.T.B. (Harvard Divinity) 1963: Ph.D. (Harvard) 1969 

Matthews, Kathleen Shive. Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Asso- 
ciate of Hanszen College 
B.S. (University of Texas) 1966; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1970 

Matusow, Allen Joseph. Professor of History and Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (Ursinus) 1958; M.A. (Harvard) 1959; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1963 

McCaleb, Thomas S. Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. (Virginia) 1967; M.A. (Lx)uisiana State) 1973; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1975 

McCarty, James D. Lieutenant (JG), U.S. Navy, and Assistant Professor of 
Naval Science 
B.S. (Maryland) 1971 

McClelland, Franklin N. Adjunct Lecturer in Accounting 
B.B.A. (California) 1935 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 27 

McDaniel, John. Lecturer in Architecture 
B.A. (Rice) 1959; B.S.M.E. (Rice) 1960 

McEvilley, Thomas. Visiting Lecturer in Art History 

B.A. (Cincinnati) 1963: M.A. (Washington) 1965; Ph.D. (Cincinnati) 1968 

McFall, June D. Instructor of Health and Physical Education and Resident 
Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (Principia) 1948; M.A. (Louisiana State) 1972 

Mclntire, Larry V. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate of 
Hanszen College 

B.Ch.E. (Cornell) 1966; M.S. (Cornell) 1966; M.A. (Princeton) 1968; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1970 

McLellan, Rex B. Professor of Materials Science 

B.Met. (Sheffield) 1957; Ph.D. (Leeds) 1962 ' ■ ' • 

McLure, Charles E. Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Professor of Economics and 
Finance 
B.A. (Kansas) 1962: M.A. (Princeton) 1964; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1966 

Meixner, John. Professor of English ' 

B.A. (City College, N.Y.) 1951; M.A. (Brown) 1953; Ph.D. (Brown) 1957 

Merwin, John Elwood. Professor of Civil Engineering and Associate of Wiess 
College 
B.A. (Rice) 1952: B.S.M.E. (Rice) 1953; M.S.M.E. (Rice) 1955; Ph.D. (Cambridge) 1962 

Michel, F. Curtis. Andrew Hays Buchanan Professor of Astrophysics in the 
Departments of Space Physics and Astronomy, Physics, and Mathematical 
Sciences, and Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1955; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1962 

Miele, Ang'elo. Professor of Astronautics and Mathematical Sciences 
Dr.C.E. (Rome) 1944; Dr.A.E. (Rome) 1946 

Mieszkowski, Peter. Adjunct Professor of Economics ^^, 

B.S. (McGill) 1957; M.A. (McGill) 1959; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1963 

Miettinen, Hannu Erik. Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.A. (Helsinki) 1967; M.A. (Helsinki) 1971; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1975 

Milburn, Ellsworth. Associate Professor of Music and Associate of Baker 
College 

A.B.(U.C.L.A.) 1962; M.A. (Mills) 1968: D.M.A. (College-Conservatory of Music, Cincinnati) 
1970 

Miller, Michael Barry. Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor of History and 
Associate of Richardson College 
B.A. (Northwestern) 1967; Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1976 

Minter, David. Professor of English and Master of Baker College 

B.A. (North Texas) 1957: M.A. (North Texas) 1958; B.D. (Yale) 1961; Ph.D. (Yale) 1965 

Mitchell, O. Jack. Professor of Architecture, Dean of the School of Architec- 
ture, and Associate of Richardson College 
B.Arch. (Washington) 1954; M.Arch. (Pennsylvania) 1961; M.C.P. (Pennsylvania) 1961 

Mixon, J. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.B.A. (Stephen F. Austin) 1952; J. D. (Houston) 1955; LL.M. (Yale) 1962 

Moake, Joel L. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering 

B.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1964; M.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1967 



28 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Modrak, Deborah. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Will 
Rice College 
B.A. (George Washington) 1970; M.A. (Chicago) 1971; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1974 

Montgomery, Stephen N. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.S. (Sam Houston) 1964 
Moore, Walter P., Jr. Lecturer in Architecture 

A.B. (Rice) 1959; B.S. (Rice) 1960; M.S. (Illinois) 1964; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1964 

Morehead, James Caddall, Jr. Profesor of Architecture, Registrar, and 
Associate of Baker College 
A.B. (Princeton) 1935; B.Arch. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1939 

Morris, Wesley Abram. Associate Professor of English and Associate of 
Richardson College 
B.A (Kentucky) 1961; M.A. (Kentucky) 1963; Ph.D. (Iowa) 1968 

Mukamel, Shaul. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. (Tel Aviv) 1969; M.A. (Tel Aviv) 1971; Ph.D. (Tel Aviv) 1976 

Mutchler, Gordon S. Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S. (M.I.T.) 1960; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1966 

Naman, Israel Adrian. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.S.M.E. (Rice) 1938; M.S.M.E. (Illinois) 1939 

Natelson, Ethan A. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering 
B.S. (Haverford) 1962; M.D. (Baylor College of Medicine) 1966 

Nelson, Deborah Hubbard. Assistant Professor of French and Associate of 

Brown College 

B.S. (Wittenberg) 1960; Certificat d'Etudes Francaises (Grenoble) 1961; M.A. (Ohio) 1964; 

Ph.D. (Ohio) 1970 
Nelson, Eric A. Captain, U.S. Navy, and Professor of Naval Science 

B.A. (U.S. Naval Academy) 1951; M.A. (George Washington) 1970 
Newport, John P. Harry and Hazel Chavanne Professor of Religious Studies 

and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (William Jewell) 1938; Th.M., Th.D. (Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) 1941, 

1946; M.A. (Texas Christian) 1948; Ph.D. (Edinburgh) 1953 

Nielsen, Niels Christian, Jr. J. Newton Rayzor Professor of Philosophy and 

Religious Thought and Honorary Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (Pepperdine) 1942; B.D. (Yale) 1946; Ph.D. (Yale) 1951 
Nitzsche, Jane Chance. Associate Professor of English and Associate of Lovett 

College 

B.A. (Purdue) 1967; M.A. (Illinois) 1968; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1971 

Norbeck, Edward. Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (Michigan) 1948; M.A. (Michigan) 1949; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1952 

Norris, Mary. Lecturer in Music 

Artists Diploma (Curtis Institute of Music) 1939 

O'Keeffe, Richard L. University Librarian 

Ph.B. (Mount Carmel) 1949; M.S. in L.S. (Louisiana State) 1956 

Oldow, John Steven. Assistant Professor of Geology 

B.S. (Washington) 1972; Ph.D. (Northwestern) 1978 
Oliver, Covey T. Radoslav Tsanoff Professor of Public Affairs in the Jesse H. 

Jones School of Administration 

B.A. (University of Texas) 1933; J.D. (University of Texas) 1936; LL.M. (Columbia) 1954; 

S.J.D. (Columbia) 1954; LL.D. (Southern Methodist University) 1976 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 29 

Oliver-Smith, Philip. Associate Professor of Art History 

A.B. (California) 1937: M.A. (California) 1950; Ph.D. (N.Y.U.) 1960 

Olson, John Steven. Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.S. (Illinois) 1968: Ph.D. (Cornell) 1972 
O'Neil, John F. Professor of Art ' 

B.F.A. (Oklahoma) 1936: M.F.A. (Oklahoma) 1939 
Palmer, Graham A. Professor of Biochemistry and Associate of Richardson 

College 

B.Sc. (Sheffield) 1957: Ph.D. (Sheffield) 1962 
Papademetriou, Peter C. Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (Princeton) 1965: M.Arch. (Yale) 1968 
Parish, John Edward. Professor of English and Resident Association of Wiess 

College 

B.A. (Sam Houston) 1934: M.A. (Texas) 1939; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1952 
Parks, Alton Zang, Jr. Assistant Professor of Architecture and Associate of 

Brown College 

B.A. (Rice) 1968: B.Arch. (Rice) 1968 
Parks, Thomas W. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.E.E. (Cornell) 1961: M.S. (Cornell) 1964: Ph.D. (Cornell) 1967 
Parry, Ronald John. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. (Occidental) 1964: Ph.D. (Brandeis) 1968 
Parsons, David G. Professor of Art and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.S. (Wisconsin) 1934: M.S. (Wisconsin) 1937 
Parsons, Spencer W. Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (Michigan) 1953: M.Arch. (Harvard Graduate School of Design) 1963 
Patten, Robert L. Professor of English and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (Swarthmore) 1960: M.A. (Princeton) 1962: Ph.D. (Princeton) 1965 

Patterson, Ronald G. Associate Professor of Music, The Shepherd Quartet 
Pearson, James Boyd, Jr. Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E. (Arkansas) 1958: M.S.E.E. (Arkansas) 1959: Ph.D. (Purdue) 1962 
Perrine, Richard H. Adjunct Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.F.A. in Arch. (Yale) 1940: M.L.S. (University of Texas) 1961 
Pfeiffer, Paul Edwin. Professor of Mathematical Sciences and Electrical 

Engineering and Associate of Brown College 

B.S.E.E. (Rice) 1938: B.D. (S.M.U.) 1943: M.S.E.E. (Rice) 1948: Ph.D. (Rice) 1952 
Phillips, Gerald C. Professor of Physics and Director of T. W. Bonner Nuclear 

Laboratories 

B.A. (Rice) 1944: M.A. (Rice) 1947: Ph.D. (Rice) 1949 

Philpott, Charles William. Professor of Biology and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.A. (Texas Tech) 1957: M.A. (Texas Tech) 1958: Ph.D. (Tulane) 1962 
Pickar, Richard W. Lecturer in Music 

B.A. (California, Los Angeles) 1956: Diploma (Akademie fur Music unddarstellendeKunst, 

Vienna) 1957: M.A. (Sam Houston State) 1964 

Picologlou, Basil F. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Materials Science and Associate of Richardson College 
Engr. (Athens, Greece) 1966: M.S.E.S. (Purdue) 1970: Ph.D. (Purdue) 1972 

Pier, Stanley M. Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science 
B.S. (Brooklyn College) 1948: M.S. (Purdue) 1949: Ph.D. (Purdue) 1952 



30 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Piper, William Bowman. Professor of English 

B.A. (Harvard) 1951: M.A. (Columbia) 1952; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1958 

Poindexter, Hally Beth. Visiting Professor of Health and Physical Education 

B.A. (Rice) 1947; B.S. (Houston) 1949; M.A. (Colorado State) 1950; Ed.D. (Columbia) 1957 

Polking, John C. Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Baker College 
B.S. (Notre Dame) 1956; M.S. (Chicago) 1961; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1966 

Pomery, John Geoffrey. Assistant Professor of Economics and Resident 
Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (Oxford) 1968; M.A. (Essex) 1970: M.A. (Rochester) 1972; Ph.D. (Rochester) 1977 

Poulos, Basilios. Assistant Professor of Art and Art History and Associate of 
Brown College 
B.F.A. (Atlanta College of Art) 1965: M.F.A. (Tulane) 1968 

Powell, Benjamin N. Lecturer in Geology 

B.A. (Amherst) 1964; M.A. (Columbia) 1966: Ph.D. (Columbia) 1969 

Quiocho, Florante. Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Associate of Will 
Rice College 
B.S. (Central Philippine) 1960; M.S. (Howard) 1961; Ph.D. (Yale) 1966 

Raaphorst, Madeleine Marie Rousseau. Professor of French 

Baccalaureat es Lettres (Poitiers) 1939; Licence on Droit (Paris) 1943; Ph.D. (Rice) 1959 

Rabson, Thomas Avelyn. Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.A. (Rice) 1954; B.S.E.E. (Rice) 1955; M.A. (Rice) 1957; Ph.D. (Rice) 1959 

Rachford, Henry H., Jr. Professor of Mathematics and Mathematical 
Sciences 
B.S. (Rice) 1945; M.A. (Rice) 1947; Sc.D. (M.I.T.) 1950 

Ransom, Harry Steelesmith, Jr. Professor of Architecture 
B.Arch. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1947; M.Arch. (Texas A&M) 1967 

Rath, R. John. Mary Gibbs Jones Professor of History 
A.B. (Kansas) 1932; M.A. (Berkeley) 1934; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1941 

Rathjen, Diana Pickett. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Associate of 
Lovett College 
B.A. (Chicago) 1968; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1972 

Rawlinson, Mary C. Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

and Associate of Richardson College 

B.A. (Vanderbilt) 1972; M.A. (Northwestern) 1974 
Rea, Ronald B. Adjunct Associate Professor of Community Service Planning 

B.A. (Harding College) 1958: M.S.W. (Louisiana State) 1960; Ph.D. (Tulane) 1968 

Reiff, Patricia H. Assistant Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and 
Associate of Jones College 
B.S. (Oklahoma State) 1971; M.A. (Rice) 1974; Ph.D. (Rice) 1975 

Rimlinger, Gaston Victor. Reginald Henry Hargrove Professor of Economics 
B.A. (Washington) 1951; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1956 

Risser, J. R. Professor of Physics 

A.B. (Franklin and Marshall) 1931; M.A. (Princeton) 1935; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1938 

Roberts, Jabus B., Jr. Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.A. (Columbia) 1965; Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1969 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 31 

Roberts, John M. Professor of Materials Science and Associate of Hanszen 
College 
B.A.Sc. (Toronto) 1953; M.A.Sc. (Toronto) 1954: Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1960 

Rogers, John J.W. Adjunct Professor of Geology 

B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1952; M.S. (Minnesota) 1952: Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 
1955 

Rorschach, Harold Emil, Jr. Professor of Physics and Associate of Hanszen 
College 
S.B. (M.I.T.) 1949; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1950: Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1952 

Rose, Beatrice S. Lecturer in Music 

Rosenberg, Michael. Assistant Professor of Music 
B.A. (Northwestern) 1976 

Rowe, Peter G. Associate Professor of Architecture and Associate of Lovett 
College 

B.Arch. (Melbourne) 1967; M.Arch. in Urban Design (Rice) 1971 

Rudolph, Frederick B. Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Associate of 
Brown College 
B.S. (Missouri) 1966; Ph.D. (Iowa State) 1971 

Rundel, Robert D. Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics and Space Physics 
and Astronomy 
B.A. (Dartmouth) 1961; Ph.D. (Washington) 1965 

Saltzberg, Bernard. Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering 

B.S. (Illinois Institute of Technology): M.S. (Illinois Institute of Technology): Ph.D. (Mar- 
quette) 

Sanborn, Hugh W. Adjunct Assitant Professor of Religious Studies and 
Associtate of Wiess College 

A.B. (Muhlenberg) 1962; B.D. (Andover Newton Theological Seminary) 1967; Ph.D. (Iowa) 
1975 

Sanders, M. Elizabeth. Assistant Professor of Political Science and Associate 
of Richardson College 
B.A. (Auburn) 1964; M.A. (Georgetown) 1969; M.A. (Cornell) 1976 

Santos, Adele Marie de Souza. Associate Professor of Architecture 

M.Arch. in Urban Design (Harvard) 1963: M.City Planning (Pennsylvania) 1968 

Santos, Antonio Paulo de Souza. Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.Arch. (Cape Town) 1966; M.Arch. (Pennsylvania) 1969: M.City Planning (Pennsylvania) 
1969 

Sass, Ronald L. Professor of Biology and Chemistry, Associate of Jones Col- 
ege, and Honorary Associate of Hanszen College 
A.B. (Augustana) 1954; Ph.D. (Southern California) 1957 

Schnoebelen, Anne M. Associate Professor of Music 

B.A. (Rosary College) 1958; M.Mus. (Illinois) 1960; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1966 

Schreiber, Janet M. Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology 
B.A. (California) 1968; M.A. (California) 1970; Ph.D. (California) 1973 

Schroepfer, George J., Jr. Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry 
B.S. (Minnesota) 1955; M.D. (Minnesota) 1957: Ph.D. (Minnesota) 1961 



32 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Schuberth, Richard. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Associate of Will 
Rice College 
B.A. (Bowdoin) 1971: Ph.D. (Brown) 1977 

Schum, David A. Professor of Psychology and Mathematical Sciences and 
Associate of Jones College 
B.A. (S.M.U.) 1956; M.A. (S.M.U.) 1961; Ph.D. (Ohio State) 1964 

Schwarzer, Rudy R. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Geology 
B.S. (Rensselaer) 1963; M.S. (Rensselaer) 1966; Ph.D. (Rensselaer) 1969 

Scott, John Frederick. Assistant Professor of Art and Art History and 
Associate of Wiess College 

A.B. (Princeton) 1958; M.A.T. (Johns Hopkins) 1962; M.A. (Columbia) 1965; Ph.D. (Col- 
umbia) 1971 

Scoular, David N. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.Arch. (Washington); M.Areh. (Washington); M.Arch. Sci. (Columbia) 

Sellers, James. David Rice Professor of Ethics 

B.E.E. (Georgia Inst, of Tech.) 1947; M.S. (Florida State) 1952; Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 1958 

Severs, Richard K. Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science 
B.S. (Wayne State) 1959; M.A. (Roosevelt) 1962; Ph.D. (Univ. of Texas, Houston) 1971 

Shalen, Peter Brock. Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Associate of 
Hanszen College 
B.A. (Harvard) 1966; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1972 

Shaper, Sue Z. Lecturer in Religous Studies 
B.A. (Rice) 1961; Ph.D. (Rice) 1973 

Shapiro, Eudice. Dorothy Richard Starling Professor of Music 
Artist's Diploma (Curtis Institute of Music) 1935 

Sharps, Carl Paul. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.Arch. (California) 1968; M.Arch. (Pennsylvania) 1970; M.City Planning (Pennsylvania) 
1970 

Sherman, Jerome N. Lecturer in Religious Studies 

B.A. (Harvard) 1958; B.H.L. (Hebrew Union College) 1960; M.A.H.L. (Hebrew Union Col- 
ege) 1963; M.A. (Boston) 1964; Ph.D. (Houston) 1968 

Sims, James Redding. Herman and George R. Brown Professor of Civil 
Engineering 

B.S.C.E. (Rice) 1941; M.S. (Illinois) 1950; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1956 

Skaggs, Ray H. Adjunct Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.A. (Rice) 1942; M.D. (Texas) 1945 

Smalley, Richard E. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (Michigan) 1965; M.A. (Princeton) 1971; Ph.D. (Prineenton) 1973 

Smith, Gordon W. Associate Professor of Economics and of Administrative 
Science 
A.B. (Washington. St. Louis) 1956; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1966 

Smith, Richard J. Assistant Professor of History and Associate of Wiess 
College 
B.A. (California) 1965; M.A. (California) 1968; Ph.D. (California) 1972 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 33 

Soligo, Ronald. Professor of Economics and Director of the Program of 
Development Studies 
B.A. (British Columbia) 1958: Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Sosinsky, Barrie Alan. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.A. (Illinois): Ph.D. (University of Bristol) 1974 

Spears, Monroe Kirk. Libbie Shearn Moody Professor of English 
A.B. (South Carolina) 1937: A.M. (South Carolina) 1937: Ph.D. (Princeton) 1940 

Spence, Dale William. Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S. (Rice) 1956: M.S. (North Texas) 1959: Ed.D. (L.S.U.) 1966 

Sperling, Harry G. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
A.B. (Pennsylvania) 1944: M.S. (New School) 1946: Ph.D. (Columbia) 1953 

Stallones, Reuel A. Adjunct Professor of Environmental Science and Eng- 
ineering 
B.A. (Michigan) 1945: M.P.H. (California, Berkeley) 1952; M.D. (Western Reserve) 1949 

Stanton, Robert J. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (Dre.xel Inst, of Tech.) 1969: M.A. (Cornell) 1971: Ph.D. (Cornell) 1974 

Stebbings, Ronald F. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and of 
Physics and Master of Jones College 
B.Sc. (London) 1952: Ph.D. (London) 1956 

Sterling, Robert R. Jesse H. Jones Professor of Management, Professor of 
Accounting, and Dean of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Adminis- 
tration 
B.S. (Denver) 1956: M.B.A. (Denver) 1958: Ph.D. (Florida) 1963 

Stevens, Paul Michael. Adjunct Associate Professor of Bioengineering 
B.A. (Maine) 1954: M.D. (Vermont) 1958 

Stewart, Charles R. Associate Professor of Biology and Associate of Jones 
College 
B.S. (Wisconsin) 1962: Ph.D. (Stanford) 1967 

Stokes, Gale. Associate Professor of History 

B.A. (Colgate) 1954: M.A. (Indiana) 1965: Ph.D. (Indiana) 1970 

Storck, Roger L. Professor of Biology 

M.S. (Inst. Industries de Fermentation-Meurice Chimie, Brussels, Belgium) 1946: Ph.D. 
(Illinois) 1960 

Subtelny, Stephen. Professor of Biology 

B.A. (Hobart) 1949: M.A. (Missouri) 1952: Ph.D. (Missouri) 1955 

Swint, John Michael. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. (California State, Humboldt) 1968: M.A. (Rice) 1972: Ph.D. (Rice) 1972 

Talbot, Raymond J., Jr. Associate Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. (M.I.T.) 1963: Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1969 

Taniguchi, Alan Y. Harry K. and Albert K. Smith Professor of Architecture 
B.Arch. (Berkeley) 1949 

Tapia, Richard. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1961: M.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1966: Ph.D. (U.C.L.A.) 1967 

Tapley, Charles R. Lecturer in Architecture 
B.A. (Rice) 1954: B.S. (Rice) 1955 



34 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Taylor, Michael E. Professor of Mathematics 
A.B. (Princeton) 1967; Ph.D. (California) 1970 

Thames, Howard D., Jr. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mathematical 
Sciences 
R.A. (Rice) 1963; Ph.D. (Rice) 1970 

Thomas, Arthur L. Harmon Whittington Professor of Accounting and 
Associate of Jones College 
B.A. (Cornell) 1952: M.B.A. (Cornell) 1956; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1963 

Thompson, Ewa Majewska. Associate Professor of Russian 

B.A. (Warsaw) 1963; M.F.A. (Sopot Conservatory) 1963; M.A. (Ohio) 1964; Ph.D. (Vander- 
bilt) 1967 

Thompson, James Robert. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B. Eng. (Vanderbilt) 1960; M.A. (Princeton) 1963; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1965 

Thomson, Charles B. Adjunct Professor of Architecture 
B.Arch. (Oklahoma) 1957; M.Arch. (M.I.T.) 1961 

Thrall, Robert M. Professor of Mathematical Sciences and Administrative 
Science 
B.A. (Illinois College) 1935; M.A. (U. of Illinois) 1935; Ph.D. (U. of Illinois) 1937 

Tipton, Albert N. Professor of Music and Associate of Will Rice College 

Artists Diploma (Curtis Inst, of Music) 1939; B.M. (Washington) 1952; M.M. (St. Louis Inst, 
of Music) 1953 

Tittel, Frank K. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Associate of Jones 
College 
B.A. (Oxford) 1955; M.A. (Oxford) 1959; Ph.D. (Oxford) 1959 

Todd, Anderson. Professor of Architecture 
B.A. (Princeton) 1943; M.F.A. (Princeton) 1949 

Tomson, Mason. Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Engi- 
neering and Associate of Baker College 
B.S. (Southwestern Oklahoma) 1967; Ph.D. (Oklahoma State) 1972 

Topazio, Virgil William. Laurence H. Favrot Professor of French and Dean of 
Humanities and Social Sciences 
B.A. (Weslayan) 1943; M.A. (Columbia 1947; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1951 

Trammell, George Thomas. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (Rice) 1944; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1950 
Trepel, Shirley I. Associate Professor of Music, The Shepherd Quartet 

B.Mus. (Curtis Inst, of Music) 1945 

Troelstra, Arne. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Associate of 
Richardson College 
Candidaat (Utrecht) 1955; Doctoraal (Utrecht) 1958: Ph.D. (Utrecht) 1964 

Tuggle, Francis D. Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (M.I.T.) 1964; M.S. (Carnegie-Mellon) 1967; Ph.D. (Carnegie-Mellon) 1971 

Turner, Drexel. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Planning 
B.A. (Rice) 1969: M.S. (Texas) 1973 

Tyler, Stephen A. Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics 
B.A. (Simpson) 1957: M.A. (Stanford) 1962; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1964 

Urrutibeheity, Hector N. Associate Professor of Spanish 

B.A. (La Plata National) 1952; Profesorado de Universidad (La Plata National) 1956; Ph.D. 
(Stanford) 1968 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 35 

Ushinsky, C. D. Associate Professor of Russian and Associate of Lovett College 
Diplome de Traducteur (School of Interpreters, Geneva) 1960: Licence es Lettres (Faculte 
des Lettres) 1962; Ph.D. (University of Chicago) 1973 

Uzzell, John D. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.S. (Houston) 1963: M.A. (Houston) 1964: Ph.D. (University of Te.xas) 1972 

Valentine, Jerome L. Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science 
B.A. (Drury) 1963; Ph.D. (North Te.xas State) 1971 

Valkovic. Vlado. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (Zagreb) 1961; M.A. (Zagreb) 1963: Ph.D. (Zagreb) 1964 

Vandiver, Frank Eve'rson. Harris Masterson, Jr., Professor of History, 
Provost and Vice President, Honorary Charter Associate of Hanszen 
College, and Honorary Associate of Brown College 
M.A. (University of Texas) 1949: M.A. (Oxford) 1963: Ph.D. (Tuiane) 1951 

Van Helden, Albert. Associate Professor of History and Associate of Baker 
College 

B.Eng. (Stevens Inst, of Tech.) 1962; M.S. (Stevens Inst, of Tech.) 1964; M.A. (Michigan) 1967; 
Ph.D. (London) 1970 

Veech, William A. Professor of Mathematics 
A.B. (Dartmouth) I960; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1963 

Veletsos, Anestis Stavrou. Brown and Root Professor of Engineering in the 
Department of Civil Engineering 
B.S. (Robert) 1948; M.S. (Illinois) 1950; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1953 

Viebig, V. Richard. Lecturer in Accounting " • 

B.A. (Rice) 1962; M. Acct. (Rice) 1977 

von der Mehden, Fred R. Albert Thomas Professor of Political Science, 
Professor of Administrative Science, and Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (U. of the Pacific) 1948; M.A. (Claremont) 1950; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1957 

Walker, James B. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (Rice) 1943; M.A. (University of Texas) 1949: Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1952 

Walker, William F. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate of 
Wiess College 

B.S. (University of Texas) 1960: M.S. (University of Texas) 1961; Ph.D. (Oklahoma State) 
1966 

Wall, Frederick T. Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. (Minnesota) 1933; Ph.D. (Minnesota) 1937 

Wallace, Kristine Gilmartin. Associate Professor of Classics 
A.B. (Bryn Mawr) 1963; A.M. (Stanford) 1965; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1967 

Walters, Geoffrey King. Professor of Physics and of Space Physics and As- 
tronomy and Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (Rice) 1953; Ph.D. rDuke) 1956 

Wang, Chao-Cheng. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.S. (Taiwan) 1959; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1965 

Wann, Trenton William. Professor of Psychology, Honorary Associate of Will 
Rice College, and Life Member of Jones College 
A.B. (California) 1937: Ph.D. (California) 1949 



36 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Ward, Calvin H. Professor of Biology and Environmental Science and Engi- 
neering 

B.S. (New Mexico State) 1955; M.A. (Cornell) 1957; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1960 

Ward, Joseph A., Jr. Professor of English 

A.B. (Notre Dame) 1952; M.A. (Tulane) 1954: Ph.D. (Tulane) 1957 

Warme, John E. Professor of Geology 

B.A. (Augustana) 1959; Ph.D. (U.C.L.A.) 1966 

Waters, David L. Lecturer in Music 
B.M.E. (Houston) 1962; M.M. (Texas) 1964 

Weinstein, Alan David. Visiting Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. (M.I.T.) 1964; M.A. (Berkeley) 1966; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1967 

Weissenberger, Klaus H. M. Professor of German and Associate of Will Rice 
College 
B.A. (Hamburg) 1959; M.A. (Hamburg) 1965; Ph.D. (Southern California) 1967 

Wells, Raymond O., Jr. Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. (Rice) 1962; M.S. (N.Y.U.) 1964; Ph.D. (N.Y.U.) 1965 

Wenkert, Ernest. E.D. Butcher Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (Washington) 1945; M.S. (Washington) 1947; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1951 

Wheeler, Mary F. Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A., B.S. (University of Texas) 1960; M.A. (University of Texas) 1963; Ph.D. (Rice) 1971 

White, Kenneth J. Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A. (Northwestern) 1968; M.A. (Wisconsin) 1970; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1973 

White, Robert H. Lecturer in Biochemistry 

B.A. (Indiana) 1968; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1974 

Widrig, Walter M. Assistant Professor of Art and Art History 
B.A. (Yale) 1951; M.A. (Columbia) 1956; Ph.D. (New York) 1975 

Wiener, Martin J. Associate Professor of History and Associate of Hanszen 
College 
B.A. (Brandeis) 1962; M.A. (Harvard) 1963: Ph.D. (Harvard) 1967 

Wierum, Frederic Atherton, Jr. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Honorary Associate of Lovett College 
B.S.M.E. (Wichita) 1955; M.S.M.E. (Houston) 1959; Ph.D. (Rice) 1962 

Wilhoit, James Cammack, Jr. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Mathematical Sciences and Associate of Wiess College 
B.S.M.E. (Rice) 1948; M.S. (Texas A&M) 1951; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1954 

Willems, Edwin P. Adjunct Professor of Architecture 
B.A. (Bethel) 1960; M.A. (Kansas) 1965: Ph.D. (Kansas) 1965 

Williams, Barton B. Commander, U.S. Navy, and Associate Professor of Naval 
Science 
B.A. (Colgate) 1956; B.S.E.E. (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School) 1964 

Williams, Donald L. Associate Professor of Architecture and Community 
Development 

B.S. (Kentucky) 1957; B.Arch. (Illinois) 1962; Dipl^me d'Architecture (Ecoles des Beaux 
Arts) 1962: M.S. in Community Development (Louisville) 1970 

Wilson, James Lee. Harry Carothers Wiess Professor of Geology 

B.A. (University of Texas) 1942; M.A. (University of Texas) 1944; Ph.D. (Yale) 1949 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 37 

Wilson, Joseph Benjamin. Associate Professor of German 
B.A. (Rice) 1950: M.A. (Rice) 1953; Pii.D. (Stanford) 1960 

Wilson, Lon J. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Richardson 
College 
B.S. (Iowa State) 1966; Ph.D. (Washington) 1971 i. 

Wilson, William L., Jr. Associate Profess or of Electrical Engin eerin g^^^ C2?f fig/'l 

B.S. (Cornell) 1965; M.S. (Cornell) 1966; Ph.D. tg ensselaer Polytechnic Tns ritut|rT972 

Windsor, Duane. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science 
B.A. (Rice) 1969; A.M. (Harvard) 1975 

Winkler, Michael. Professor of German 

A.B. (St. Benedict's) 1961; A.M. (Colorado) 1963; Ph.D. (Colorado) 1966 

Winningham, Geoffrey L. Professor of Art and Associate of Richardson 
College 
B.A. (Rice) 1965; M.S. (Illinois Inst, of Tech.) 1968 

Wirz, Dadi. Assistant Professor of Art 

Diplome Federal (Confederation Suisse) 1950;Certificat(Kunstgewerbeschule, Basel) 1950; 
Certificat (Paris) 1952 

Wolf, Richard A. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and of Physics 
B.Eng.Phys. (Cornell) 1962; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1966 

Wood, Donald Ira. Professor of Education 

B.A. (San Antonio) 1942; M.Ed. (Trinity) 1954; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1961 

Worzel, J. Lamar. Adjunct Professor of Geology 

B.S. (Lehigh University) 1940; M.A. (Columbia) 1948; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1949 

Wright, Neil R. Assistant Professor of Economics and Associate of Brown 
College 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1968; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1977 

Young, Richard D. Professor of Economics and Mathematical Sciences 
B.A. (Minnesota) 1951; M.A. (Minnesota) 1954; Ph.D. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1965 

Zeff, Stephen A. Professor of Accounting 

B.S. (Colorado) 1955; M.S. (Colorado) 1957; M.B.A. (Michigan) 1960; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1962 

Zimmerman, Stuart D. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.A. (Chicago) 1954; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1961 



Professional Research Staff 

Badaehhape, R. B. Assistant Director of the Fluorine Laboratory in Chemistry 
B.Sc. (M. -J. College, India) 1953; M.Sc. (Poona, India) 1955; Ph.D. (Poona, India) 1963 

Bourland, H. M. Associate Director of Rice Engineering Design and Develop- 
ment Institute, Assistant to the Dean of Engineering for Student Develop- 
ment, Associate Director of Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, Lecturer 
in Electrical Engineering. 
B.S. (Texas Tech) 1955; S.M.E.E. (M.I.T.) 1967 

Buchanan, J. A. Senior Research Engineer in Physics 
B.S. (Houston) 1970 

Clement, J. M., Jr. Research Engineer in Physics 

B.S. (Cornell) 1965; M.S. (Cornell) 1966; Ph.D. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) 1972 



38 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Curtis, Margaret W. Research Scientist in Environmental Science and 
Engineering 
B.A. (Rice) 1973; M.S. (Rice) 1976 

Fryer, G. E. Research Instrumentation Engineer in Geology 
B.S. (Univ. Manitoba) 1952 

Harel, Moshe. Research Scientist in Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) 1969; M.S. (U.C.L.A.) 1971 

Hauge, R. H. Assistant Director of High Temperature Group in Chemistry 
B.A. (Loras College) 1960; Ph.D. (California) 1965 

Hughes, Jack B. Electron Microscopist in Biology 

Hutchin, Stephen R. Research Scientist in Environmental Science and 
Engineering 
B.S. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology) 1977 

King, Joe M. Senior Research Associate in Environmental Science and 
Engineering 
B.S. (Sam Houston) 1967; M.S. (Sam Houston) 1968; Ph.D. (University of Texas) 1971 

Kisic, A. Senior Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (Zagreb, Yugoslavia) 1954; Ph.D. (Zagreb, Yugoslavia) 1961 
Madigan, W. P. Research Engineer in Physics 

Manka, R. H. Space Scientist in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (Colorado College) 1958; M.A. (Dartmouth) 1961; M.A. (Rice) 1965; Ph.D. (Rice) 1972 

McGarity, J. O. Electrical Engineer in Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. (Houston) 1976 

Nystrom, David S. Staff Scientist in Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.A. (Baylor) 1962 

Oehme, Delbert R. Electronics Engineer in Space Physics and Astronomy 

Parish, E. J. Senior Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (Southwest Texas State) 1967; M.S. (Sam Houston) 1970; Ph.D. (Mississippi State) 1973 

Smith, Wayne A. Electronics Engineer and Contracts Administrative 
Manager in Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. (Southern California) 1958 

Stewart, Michael F. Electrical Engineer in Space Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. (Rice) 1973 

Waggott, Warren W. Research Engineer in Environmental Science and 
Engineering 
B.S. (United States Coast Guard Academy) 1950 

White, R. H. Spectroscopist and Lecturer in Biochemistry 

B.S. (Indiana) 1968; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1974 



Professional Staff of the Library 

Adler, Marianne G. Pre-order and Verification Librarian 
B.A. (Rice) 1973; M.L.S. (University of Texas) 1974 

Baber, Elizabeth Ann. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (Rice) 1960; M.L.S. (California) 1961 



PROFESSIONAL STAFF OF THE LIBRARY 39 

Borlase, Rodney R. Collection Development Coordinator 

B.A. (Kansas) 1968; M.L.S. (Kansas State Teachers) 1969 

Cho, Keiko. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (Manitoba) 1964; B.L.S. (Toronto) 1965: A.R.C.T. (Toronto) 1966 

Collins, Mary Frances. Head of Technical Services 

B.S. (Simmons) 1957: M.L.S. (State University of New York) 1966 

Damico, James. Head of Public Services 

B.S. (C.W. Post College of L.I.U.) 1959: M.L.S. (Rutgers) 1961 

Dollar, Betty Jo. Head Science Reference Librarian and Director, R.LC.E. 

B.A. (L.S.U.) 1952; M.I.S.U. (Texas Woman's) 1970 

Garcia, John. Collection Development Librarian 

B.A. (Instituto General y Tecnico Pontevedra) 1934; Certificate of Law (Universidad de 
Santiago de Compostela) 1936; M.L.S. (Montevideo) 1966: Docteur en Historic (Paris) 1975 

Gibson, Charles M. Coordinator of Circulation Services 

B.A. (Texas Tech) 1968; M.A. (Texas Tech) 1973; M.L.S. (University of Texas) 1974 

Holibaugh, Ralph W. Music Librarian 

B.A. (Cincinnati) 1964; M.A. (Kent State) 1970; M.S.L.S. (Illinois) 1975 

Hyman, Feme B. Humanities Reference Librarian 

B.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1948: M.A. (Loyola) 1969; M.L.S. (Illinois) 1969 

Kile, Barbara. Government Documents, Maps, and Micromaterials Librarian 
B.A. (Illinois) 1967; M.S. in L.S. (Illinois) 1968 

Laity, Barbara. Collection Development Librarian 

B.A. (Michigan) 1971; M.L.S. (Michigan) 1974 

Lane, Sarah Louise. Circulation Librarian Emerita 

B.A. (Rice) 1919; B.S. in L.S. (Columbia) 1932 ' " ' 

Law, Daniel T. Science Reference Librarian and Assistant Director, R.LC.E. 

B.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1966; M.S. (Oregon State) 1968; M.A. L.S. (Rosary Graduate School of 
Library Science) 1972; Ph.D. (Oregon State) 1975 

Marsales, Rita. Series Catalog Librarian ■■' ■ 

B.A. (L.S.U.) 1957: M.L.S. (University of Texas) 1973 • ._ '' -i , ! ;•••,,; 

Miller, Shelby. Art Librarian 

B.A. (Texas Women's) 1964; M.S. (L.S.U.) 1967 

Mullins, James R. Social Sciences Reference Librarian 

B.A. (University of Texas) 1973: M.L.S. (University of Texas) 1975 

O'Keefe, Richard L. University Librarian 

Ph.B. (Mount Carmel) 1949; M.S. in L.S. (L.S.U.) 1956 

Parker, Nancy Boothe. Director of the Woodson Research Center 

B.A. (Rice) 1952: M.S. in L.S. (Catholic) 1965 

Perrine, Richard H. Assistant Librarian for Planning, Coordinator of Refer- 
ence Services, and Adjunct Associate Professor of Architecture 
B.F.A. (Yale) 1940; M.L.S. (University of Texas) 1961 

Redmon, Alice Jane. Head, Catalog Department 
B.A. (Denver) 1937 

Ruecking, Frederick H. Assistant Librarian for Systems Development 

B.A. (University of Texas) 1952; M.A. (University of Texas) 1955; A.M.L.S. (Michigan) 1963 



40 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Silversteen, Sophy. Serials Librarian 

B.A. (Rice) 1952; M.S. (University of Texas) 1954; J.L.S. (University of Texas) 1964 

Swift, Stephen. Special Consultant to the Fondren Library and to theyl ?<.s^r/an 
History Yearbook 
Diploma (University of Berlin) 

Wray, Beth. Manuscripts Curator 

B.A. (Emory) 1971; M.A. (Georgetown) 1973 

Professional Staff of the Institute for 
Computer Services and Applications 

Beale, Alan R. Systems Programmer 
M.A. (Harvard) 1971 

Caruso, Nick. Programmer/Analyst 
B.A. (Rice) 1970 

Fields, Corinne V. Manager of Programming and Data Control 
B.B.A. (S.M.U.) 1950 

Gerbode, Farrell E. Manager, Systems Support 
B.A. (Rice) 1973; M.A.Ma.Sc. (Rice) 1977 

Henshaw, Allan M. Programmer/Analyst 
B.A. (Westminster) 1975 

Huston, Priscilla Jane. Director 

B.A. (Mt. Holyoke) 1964 

Kelly, Virginia. Systems Programmer 
B.A. (Rice) 1971 

Lane, Joni Sue. Systems Programmer 
B.S. (Oklahoma) 1960 

Nichols, Clyde C. Manager, Computer Operations 

B.S.E. (Nebraska) 1965 
Rickards, Linda. Data Control Programmer 

Schafer, Richard. Systems Programmer 

B.A. (Rice) 1973; M.A. M.S. (Rice) 1974 
Valsecchi, Joseph. Programmer/Analyst 

A.S. (NASA Community) 1973 

Wakefield, James F. Programmer/Analyst 
Williamson, Mark. Systems Programmer 

Staff of the Health Service 

Brenen, Daniel M., M.D. Director, Psychiatric Service 
A.B. (Harvard); M.D. (Baylor) 

Fullen, Dollie, L.V.N. Head Nurse 

Kadry, Ahmad, M.D. Director, Health Services 

B.Sc. (Dalhousie University) 1964; M.D. (Dalhousie University) 1969; D.P.H. (University of 
Toronto) 1977 

Watson, Fay, R.N. Nurse 



ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 41 

Staff of the Athletic Department 



Alborn, Raymond. Head Football Coach 

B.S. (Rice) 1962 .'i 

Backest, Richard. Assistant Football Coach 
B.S. (Texas A&M) 1968 

Breckwoldt, Frederick B. Academic Counselor and Swimming Coach 
B.S. (Spring-field) 1958; M.E.D. (Houston) 1962 

Brown, Steve. Assistant Athletic Trainer 
B.S. (Texas Tech) 1973 

Butler, James E. Chief Team Physician 

B.S. (Sewanee) 1956; M.A. (Southwest Texas State) 1957; M.D. (University of Texas) 1962 

Castaneda, James A. Faculty Representative 

B.A. (Drew University) 1954; M.A. (Yale) 1955; Ph.D. (Yale) 1958 

Dean, Michael. Assistant Football Coach and Defensive Coordinator 
B.S. (Alabama) 1970; M.E.D. (Alabama) 1977 

Eggert, Allen. Head Athletic Trainer 

B.S. (Rice) 1963; M.A. (California Western) 1967 

Erfurth, August F. Athletic Director 
B.S. (Rice) 1949; M.E.D. (Trinity) 1961 

Estes, George. Assistant Basketball Coach 

B.A. (North Carolina) 1971; M.A.T. (The Citadel) 1973 

Mainord, Carlos. Assistant Football Coach 

B.S. (McMurry College) 1966; M.E.D. (Texas Tech) 1969 

May, John Robert. Head Coach, Track and Field 

B.S. (Rice) 1965 

Moore, Charles Edward, Jr. Assistant Athletic Director 
B.S. (Rice) 1938 

Norwood, Gordon W. Assistant Football Coach 
B.S.E. (Arkansas) 1970 

Osburn, Douglas E. Baseball Coach and Club Sports Coordinator 

B.S. (Houston) 1955 

Peiffer, Susan C. Coordinator of Women's Athletics 
B.S. (Ohio University) 1976 

Plumbley, John. Golf Coach and Executive Secretary of the Owl Club 
B.S. (Rice) 1948; M.E.D. (University of Texas) 1951 

Rossley, Thomas. Assistant Football Coach 
B.S. (University of Cincinnati) 1969 

Schuler, Michael H. Head Basketball Coach 
B.S. (Ohio) 1962 

Sexton, Anthony. Assistant Football Coach and Recruiting Coordinator 

B.S. (Cincinnati) 1971 

Straub, Stephen M. Assistant Track and Field Coach 
B.A. (Rice) 1972 



42 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Travis, Robert F. Tennis Coach 
B.A. (Rice) 1966 

Unbehagen, Theodore G. Assistant Head Football Coach and Offensive 
Coordinator 
B.B.A. (Texas A&I) 1969: M.B.A. (Texas Tech) 

Whitmore, William Rogers. Sports Information Director 
B.J. (University of Texas) 1942 

Williams, Bobby. Assistant Football Coach ^ ' "^ 

B.S. (Rice) 1958 



University Standing Committees 

for 1978-1979 

The president is an ex officio member of all committees. 

Committee on Admissions: Prof. Bowen, chairman; Profs. S. L. Clark, Curl, 
Grob, Jump, Lutes, Marcus, Modrak, Morehead, Nitzsche, Sass, and 
Mclntire; Profs. K. Brown, Koehler, and Mr. Stabell, ex officio; Prof. S. A. 
Baker (college master); Mrs. Archie Hood and Mrs. Pat Moore (alumnae); 
Mr. Ricky Balthrop and Miss Deborah Sedberry (undergraduate students). 

Committee on Affirmative Action: Prof. Lee, chairman; Profs. Burnett and 
Margrave; Mrs. Laura Branch, Ms. Virginia Gonzales, Mrs. Marian-Jordan, 
Mrs. K.M. Murfin, Mr. John Pesl, Mr. Tomas Sanchez, and Mr. Anthony 
Sexton (staff); Mr. Mitchell Sadler, ex officio; Mrs. Sharolyn Wood 
(alumna); Mr. Arturo Porras (graduate student); Mr. Kevin Badeaux and 
Mr. Allan Arthur Shenoi (undergraduate students). 

Committee on Campus Safety: Prof. Mutchler, chairman; Profs. Kilpatrick, 
Picologlou, and A. M. Santos; Mr. Bob Berger, ex officio; Mr. H. R. Rhodes 
(consultant); Mr. George Hildebrandt (graduate student); and Miss Susan 
Lopez (undergraduate student). 

Committee of the College Masters: Prof. Minter, chairvian; Profs. Armeniades, 
S.A. Baker, Brotzen. J. W. Freeman, Huston, W. C. Martin, and Stebbings; 
Prof. K. Brown and Mr. Marion Hicks, ex officio. 

Committee on Computers: Prof. Feustel, chairman; Profs. Dyson, Glantz, 
C. Gordon, Jump, N. F. Lane, Michel, Quiocho, K. J. White, and Mr. 
O'Keeffe; Prof. Vandiver and Mrs. Priscilla Huston, ex officio; Mr. W. J. 
Matthias (alumnus); Mr. John Morgan (graduate student); Mr. Ron Cytron 
and Mr. Mark G. Johnson (undergraduate students). 

Education Council: Prof. Wood, chairman; Profs. Ambler, Bearden, Burnett, 
Campbell, Casey, Class, Davidson, B. F. Jones, R. G. Jones, W. A. Kelly, 
Levin, Meixner, D. H. Nelson, Pfeiffer, Urrutibeheity, Wiener, J. B. 
Wilson, and L. J. Wilson; Prof. Topazio, ex officio; and Antone Hackebeil 
(undergraduate student). 



UNIVERSITY STANDING COMMITTEES 43 

Committee on Examinations and Standing: Prof. Estle, chairman; Profs. 
Citron, Parish, Schum, Spence, Stokes, and Subtelny; Profs. K. Brown and 
Morehead, ex officio; Miss Carmellia Boyer and Miss Dana Miller 
(undergraduate students). 

Faculty Council: Profs. Angene, Bowen, Burrus, Duck, Greanias, W. C. 
Howell, D. H. Johnson, B. F. Jones, Leland, Minter, Pfeiffer, Rathjen, 
Spears, von der Mehden, and L. J. Wilson. 

Committee on Fringe Benefits: Prof. Rimlinger, chairman; Profs. Bourland, 
Brody, Dowden. Matthews, Ms. Jackie Ehlers, Mr. Glenn Fryer, Mr. Carl 
Virtue and Mr. Joseph Nagy; Mr. M.O. Sadler and Mrs. Ursula Szmalec 
(consultants). 

Graduate Council: Prof. Margrave, chairman; Profs. Doran, F. M. Fisher, 
D. L. Huddle, Leland, McLellan, Polking, Rowe, Schroepfer, Spears, 
Tipton, Ward, Warme, and Weissenberger; Prof. Vandiver, ex officio; Dr. 
Isaac Dvoretzky (alumnus); Mr. David Cooke (graduate student). 

Committee on the Library: Prof. Matusow, chairman; Profs. Boorman, 
Camfield, Cuthbertson, W. A. Kelly, Kulstad, Kurtzman, Piper, Rudolph, 
J. R. Thompson, and Wall; Prof. Vandiver and Mr. O'Keeffe, ex officio; 
Mrs. C. M. Hudspeth (alumna); Mr. Ho T'Su Ping and Mrs. Florentz Kunze 
(graduate students); and Mr. Matt Muller (undergraduate student). 

Committee on Public Lectures: Prof. Isle, chairman; Profs. Camfield, 
Clayton, P. Cooper, Loevinsohn, Palmer, and A. M. Santos; Mr. David 
Rodwell, ex officio; Mrs. Sam Worden (alumna); and Mr. Curt Jacobson 
(graduate student). 

Committee on Religious Activities: Prof. Nielsen, chairman; Profs. Garside, 
Havens, N. F. Lane, Modrak, Newport, R. Smith, N. R. Wright; Mrs. W. M. 
Howard (alumna); Mr. Bob Eubank (graduate student); and Mr. Cliff 
Shapiro (undergraduate student). 

Research Council: Prof. Brody, chairman; Profs. Alcover, Doran, Harvey, 
Hyman, Palmer, Rorschach, Thrall, Tittel, and J. B. Walker; Profs. A. J. 
Chapman, W. E. Gordon, S. Jones, Margrave, Mitchell, Sterling, and 
Topzaio, ex officio; Mr. Lawrence Hamilton and Dr. Archie Hood (alumni), 
Mr. Mark Farris and Mr. Brian Whitehead (graduate students). 

Residential Colleges Management Advisory Committee: Mr. Marion Hicks, 
chairman; Prof. S. A. Baker (college master), fall semester; Prof. 
Armeniades (college master), spring semester; Prof. S. D. Baker (faculty 
associate); and Mr. Chuck Newell (undergraduate student). 

Rice University Athletics Committee: Prof. Castaffeda, chairman; Profs. 
Campbell, Chapman, Howell, Matthews, Stebbings; Profs. Akers, 
Vandiver, and Mr. Joseph Nalle (treasurer), ex officio; Mr. W. H. Lane 
(trustee); Mr. T. N. Law (Board of Governors); Mr. Temple Tucker 
(alumnus); Mr. "Froggie" Williams (R Association); Miss Becky Mathre 
and Mr. Chuck Jewell (undergraduate students). 



44 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Rice University Marshals: Prof. Few, Chief Marshal; Profs. J. W. Clark, 
Dorfman, Hempel, Lee, Lutes, D. H. Nelson, Smalley, Widrig, and Wiener. 

Rice University Studies Review Board: Prof. Eifler, chairman; Profs. 
Curtis, Huddle, Kelber, and Parish; Prof. Drew (editor), ex officio. 

R.O.T.C. Committee: Prof. Boterf, chairman; Profs. Carr, Link, E. Nelson 
Rathjen, and Wilhoit; Prof. Armeniades (college master): undergraduate 
student to be named. 

Committee on Scholarships and Awards: Prof. Cloutier, chairman; Profs. 
Brooks, Characklis, Evans, D. H. Nelson, R. J. Smith; Prof. K. Brown, 
ex officio; and Mr. William Broyles, Sr. (alumnus). 



Committee on Space Assignment: Mr. H. R. Pitman, chairman; Prof. A. J. 
Chapman, W. E. Gordon, S. Jones, Mitchell, Sterling, and Topazio; Profs. 
K. Brown, Margrave, and Vandiver, e.r officio. 

Committee on Student Affairs: Prof. K. Brown, chairman; Profs. Carrington 
(proctor), W. C. Martin (college master), Stebbings (college master), Lee 
(Student Association faculty adviser), Mr. Roy Seller (Student Association 
president), Mr. Doug Canter (college president), Mr. Kevin McKenna 
(college president). Mr. David Cook (graduate student). Mr. Tim Baldwin 
(graduate student), Mr. James Bernhard (alumnus); Mrs. Bonnie Heliums, 
Prof. Vandiver, and the coordinator of academic advising, ex officio. 

Committee on Student Financial Aid: Prof. Rorschach, chairman; Profs. 
Drew, Gottschalk, Huston, L. T. Johnson, Milburn, T. W. Parks; Prof. 
Brotzen (college master); Prof. K. Brown, Mr. G. D. Hunt, and Mr. R. N. 
Stabell, ex officio; Mr. Thomas Greene HI (alumnus); undergraduate 
student to be named. 



Committee on Student Health: Prof. Castaneda, chairman; Profs. Cushman, 
Eggert, Matthews, Rimlinger; Prof. J. W. Freeman (college master); Dr. A. 
Kadry. Mrs. B. Heliums, and Dr. D. Brener, ex officio; Dr. J. Robert Stanton 
(alumnus); Miss Mary Ann Tetreault (graduate student); undergraduate 
student to be named. 



Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum: Prof. Klineberg, chairman; 
Profs. Eifler, Huston, Mclntire, Parsons, Philpott, Schnoebelen, Talbot, 
Wiener, Wierum, and W. L. Wilson; Profs. K. Brown and Vandiver, ex 
officio; Mrs. Robins Brice (alumna); Mr. Russell Brown and Mr. Richard 
Toye (undergraduate students). 

Committee on Undergraduate Teaching: Prof. Stewart, chairman; Profs. 
Burrus, Davidson, Dunning, B. F. Jones, D. M. Lane, Merwin, Milburn, 
A. Z. Parks, and Rawlinson; Prof. K. Brown, ex officio; Mr. Chris Amandes 
(alumnus); Mr. Ralph Hornung (graduate student); Miss Karen Appling 
and Mr. Mark Brennan (undergraduate students). 



UNIVERSITY STANDING COMMITTEE 45 

University Council: Pres. Hackerman, chairman; Profs. Akers, Burrus, 
Margrave, Minter, Patten, Pfeiffer, Rathjen, Rorschach, Vandiver, von 
der Mehden, and L. J. Wilson; Prof. A. J. Chapman, ex officio; Prof. K. 
Brown, secretanj; Mr. John Morgan (graduate student); Mr. Frank Bay 
and Mr. Joel Lueckenhoff (undergraduate students). 

University Review Board: Prof. Pfeiffer, chairma}i; Profs. Boorman, 
Higginbotham, and Spence; Mr. Jim Ray (graduate student); Miss Liz 
Heitman and Mr. Hal Marcus (undergraduate students). 



Chairs and Lectureships 

Throughout its history, Rice University has been especially fortunate in 
the number of its friends and benefactors. Some of these are memorialized in 
the names of buildings and special physical facilities; others have generously 
provided for the enrichment of the university's intellectual life by establishing 
chairs and lectureships either on temporary or permanent bases. Rice takes 
pleasure in recognizing on these pages some of these contributors to its 
academic excellence. 

J. S. Abercrombie Chair in the School of Engineering 

Agnes Cullen Arnold Professorship in Fine Arts 

Herbert S. Autrey Chair 

Lynette S. Autrey Chair 

Brown and Root Chair of Engineering 

George R. Brown Chair 

Herman and George R. Brown Chair in Civil Engineering 

Andrew Hays Buchanan Professorship of Astrophysics 

E. D. Butcher Professorship 

Louis Calder Professorship in Chemical Engineering 

Harry S. Cameron Chair in Mechanical Engineering 

Harry and Hazel Chavanne Chair of Religious Studies 

Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Professorship in Economics and Finance 

Carey Croneis Professorship in Geology 

Distinguished Professorship of Architecture 

G. C. Evans Instructorship in Mathematics 

W. Maurice Ewing Professorship in Oceanography 

Laurence H. Favrot Professorship in French 

Henry S. Fox, Sr., Chair of Instruction in Economics 

Lena Gohlman Fox Chair in Political Science 



46 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Noah Harding Professorship of Mathematics 

Reginald Henry Hargrove Chair of Economics 

A. J. Hartsook Chair in Chemical Engineering 

William Pettus Hobby Chair in American History 

Jesse H. Jones Professorship in Management 

Mary Gibbs Jones Professorship in History 

William Alexander Kirkland Professorship in the 
Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration 

Edgar Odell Lovett Chair in Mathematics 

Carolyn and Fred McManis Professorship in Philosophy 

Harris Masterson, Jr., Chair in History 

Andrew W. Mellon Junior Humanities Scholars 

Andrew W. Mellon Professorship in the Humanities 

Libbie Shearn Moody Professorship of English 

W. L. Moody, Jr., Professorship of Mathematics 

Joseph and Joanna Nazro Mullen Professorship in Fine Arts 

George A. Peterkin Chair of Political Economy 

J. Newton Rayzor Chair in Philosophy and Religious Thought 

David Rice Chair in Ethics 

The Schlumberger Chair of Advanced Studies and Research 

Harry K. and Albert K. Smith Chair in Architecture 

Dorothy Richard Starling Visiting Professor of Violin 

Henry Gardiner Symonds Professorship 

Albert Thomas Chair of Political Science 

Radoslav A. Tsanoff Chair of Public Affairs 

Isla and Percy Turner Professorship in Biblical Studies 

Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry 

Harmon Whittington Professorship 

Harry Carothers Wiess Chair of Geology 

Brown Foundation — J. Newton Rayzor Lectures 

W. V. Houston Lectureship 

Ervin Frederick Kalb Lectureship in History 

The Rockwell Lectures 

Tsanoff Lectureship in the Humanities 






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Information for. 
Undergraduates 



Curricula, Majors, and 
Degree Requirements 



The Bachelor of Arts degree at Rice is awarded with a designated major in 
some field of architecture, the humanities, social sciences, science, or engineer- 
ing. The general university requirements for the B.A. degree, as well as the 
options open to students in their choice of majors, are described below. 

The Bachelor of Music is offered by the Shepherd School of Music only in 
conjunction with the Master of Music, both of which are awarded simulta- 
neously on completion of a five-year program of professional studies. 

The various engineering departments also offer the Bachelor of Science 
degree which, like the B.A., normally requires four years for completion. 

For students interested in teaching in the secondary schools, a program of 
teacher training leading to state certification may be completed together with 
the Bachelor of Arts degree. This program is administered by the Education 
Department. 

Programs that satisfy the requirements for admission to medical, dental, 
or law school are also available in conjunction with various majors. 

Degree Requirements and Majors 

In March, 1978, the faculty of the university approved changing the desig- 
nation of graduation requirements, major requirements, and distribution 
requirements from semester courses to semester hours. The change becomes 
effective in the academic year 1978-1979. Students enrolled at the university in 
a degree program prior to or at the beginning of the fall semester 1978 have 
the option of completing the university and major requirements for their 
degree according to either semester courses or semester hours. All students 
entering after fall 1978 will fulfill the semester-hour requirements. In the 
information that follows, as well as in the requirements for departmental 
majors listed under Courses of Instruction, university and departmental 
requirements are stated in semester hours, followed in parentheses by the 
corresponding requirement in semester courses. No course equivalence is 
shown for the regulations governing the president's honor roll, academic 
probation, and academic suspension since these have been calculated by 
semester hours in the past. 



49 



50 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

University Credit Requirements 

Students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree must pass a minimum of 
120 semester hours (forty semester courses of at least 3 semester hours with 
associated laboratories and tutorial sections). In fulfilling all university and 
major requirements, many students will complete more than this minimum. 
Within their total program, students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree in 
any discipline other than architecture must pass a minimum of 60 semester 
hours (twenty semester courses of at least 3 semester hours) in addition to 
major requirements specified by their department. Architecture majors must 
pass 38 semester hours in addition to their major requirements. 

To fulfill the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in one of 
the several branches of engineering with the exception of chemical engineering, 
students must pass no fewer than 134 semester hours. Students fulfilling the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Science in chemical engineering must pass up 
to 137 semester hours, depending on accreditation requirements. 

For either bachelor's degree, no less than 42 semester hours (fourteen 
courses) completed in fulfillment of the degree requirements must be on an 
advanced level (numbered 300 or higher). 

After students have fulfilled university distribution requirements and the 
requirements for a designated major (see below), all remaining courses in 
their degree programs are free electives. 

University Distribution Requirements 

The university distribution requirements are based on the belief that an 
undergraduate education should include some acquaintance with areas of 
study outside the student's field of specialization. Many students fulfill most of 
their distribution requirements in the first two years, and because they have 
explored several different areas, they are better prepared to decide on a major 
at the end of the sophomore year. 

Before graduation each student must have completed three or more 
semester hours (one or more courses) from at least five of the six subject cate- 
gories listed below, and at least twelve semester hours (four courses) from each 
pair of subject categories designated by a roman numeral. 
I. 1. Literature and language 

2. Fine arts, music, philosophy (except logic), and religion 
II. 3. Economics, history, and political science 

4. Anthropology, behavioral science, linguistics, psychology, and 
sociology 
III. 5. Biological science, physical science, and engineering 
6. Mathematics, mathematical sciences, and logic 

Skills 

English Competency Requirement. Every Rice student must demonstrate 
competency in English comprehension and composition. This requirement is 
satisfied by passing the English competency examination administered by the 
English Department to all entering students during orientation week. Students 
who fail to pass this test are required to enroll in English 103, a one semester 
self-paced course in composition which carries both degree and distribution 
credit. Satisfactory completion of this course will then fulfill the English com- 
petency requirement. English 103 is also open, space permitting, to students 
who have passed the English competency examination but wish to improve 
their writing skills further. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 51 

Physical Education. Each student must pass two semester courses in basic 
health and physical education. These do not count toward the semester hours 
(or courses) required for a degree. 

Departmental Majors and Honors Programs 

Each spring, on Majors Day. freshmen and sophomores are excused from 
their morning classes to visit the faculty and upperclass students in depart- 
ments they are considering for their majors. Students normally designate a 
major in March prior to preliminary registration for the junior year. The 
department or title of the major is then noted on the student's transcript, and a 
faculty adviser is assigned in the major department. Introductory courses 
taken in the freshmen or sophomore years may be counted in fulfilling the 
major requirements even before formal designation of a major has been made. 

Students should be aware that physical limitations of some departments 
occasionally make it necessary to limit the number of majors admitted to a 
particular department. 

Students are always free to change majors in the junior or senior year, 
although this may entail one or more additional semesters at the university. 

For information on the specific requirements for any departmental major, 
students should consult the departmental listings under Courses of Instruction 
and seek the advice of a faculty member in the department. 

In establishing an undergraduate major for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
departments must specify a minimum of eighteen semester hours (six courses) 
for majors in the humanities and social sciences and twenty-four semester hours 
(eight courses) for majors in science. No department may specify more semester 
hours than the number equivalent to twenty courses of three or four semester 
hours each (related laboratories, required courses, and prerequisites included), 
the total not to exceed eighty semester hours. 

In establishing a departmental major for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in one of the various branches of engineering with the exception of chemical 
engineering, no deparment may specify more than 92 semester hours (required 
courses, prerequisites, and related laboratories included). In establishing the 
departmental major for the B.S. in chemical engineering, the department may 
specify no more than the semester hours necessary to meet the requirements of 
the accrediting agency, up to a maximum total of 104 semester hours (required 
courses, prerequisites, and related laboratories included). 

Undergraduate honors programs are open to qualified students, with 
departmental approval, in several departments. Through small classes and 
seminars, independent reading or research projects, and close contact with 
faculty research, students in an honors program may accelerate study in their 
major fields, and in some cases enter graduate courses. Information on the 
qualifications for admission and the content of honors programs may be found 
in the departmental listings under Courses of Instruction. 

Areas of Study 

Architecture 

Students interested in architecture may choose from several options, 
including programs leading to either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of 
Architecture degree. The Bachelor of Arts requires four years of study with a 
major in either architecture or architectural studies. The Bachelor of Architec- 
ture requires six years, with the fifth year being an in-service preceptorship in 
a professional office. 



52 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



SCHOOL, DIVISION, 
DEPARTMENT 



DEGREES 
OEFERED 



MAJORS, OPTIONS, AREAS 
OF CONCENTRATION 



The Jesse H. Jones 


Master of Accounting, Master 


Accounting, Management 


School of Adminis- 
tration 


of Business and Public Man- 
agement, Ph.D. (For B.A.. see 
interdepartmental major in 
Managerial Studies) 




The George R. Brow n 






School of 






Engineering 






Chemical 


B.A., B.S., M.S., Master of 


Chemical engineering, nuclear engineering. 


EiifjineerinR 


Chemical Engineering Ph.D. 


polymer science, petroleum reservoir engi- 
neering, thermodynamics, biomedical engi- 
neering 
Civil engineering, structural analysis and 


Civil Engineering 


B.A.. B.S., M.S., Master of 




Civil Engineering, Ph.D. 


design, structural mechanics, geotechnical 
engineering, environmental engineering 


Electrical 


B.A., B.S., M.S., Master of 


Electrical engineering; bio-engineering; cir- 


Engineering 


Electrical Engineering Ph.D. 


cuits, control, and communications sy.stems; 
computer science and engineering; lasers, 
microwaves, and solid-state electonics 


Environmental 


M.S.. Master of Environ- 


Environmental science and engineering 


Science and 


mental Science, Master of 




Engineering 


Environmental Engineering, 
Ph.D. (For B.A. as double 
major, see department) 




Mechanical 


B.A., B.S., M.S.. Master of 


Majors: mechanical engineering, materials 


Engineering and 


Materials Science, Master of 


science. Options: thermal sciences and energy 


Materials Science 


Mechanical Engineering, 


conversion, gas dynamics, hydrodynamics and 




Ph.D. 


ocean engineerjng, stress analysis and me- 
chanical behavior of materials, aerospace 
engineering, engineering science 


The School of 






Natural Sciences 






Biochemistry 


B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 


Biochemistry, biophysical chemistry, molecu- 
lar biology, organic chemistry 


Biology 


B.A., M.A., Ph,D. 


Biology 


Chemistry 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 


Chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chem- 
istry, inorganic chemistry, chemical physics 


Geology 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 


Geology, geochemistry, geophysics, marine 
geology and oceanography, meteoritics 


Mathematical 


B.A., M.A., Master in Applied 


Computer science, numerical analysis, opera- 


Sciences 


Mathematical Sciences. Ph.D. 


tions research, physical mathematics, proba- 
bility/statistics 


Mathematics 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 


Comple.x analysis, dynamics, ergodic theory. 
Lie groups, numerical analysis, partial differen- 
tial equations, topology 


Physics 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 


Physics, space physics and astronomy, bio- 
physics, nuclear energy, geophysics 


Space Physics and 


M.S., Ph.D. (For B.A., see 


E.xperimental and theoretical space physics. 


Astronomy 


Physics Department, space 


observational astronomy, astrophysics, and 




physics option) 


atomic physics 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 53 



SCHOOL. DIVISION. 
DEPARTMENT 



DEGREES 
OFFERED 



MAJORS, OPTIONS. AREAS 
OF CONCENTRATION 



The School of 


B.A 


B.Arch., 


Master of 


Architecture, Architectural Studies 


Architecture 


Arc 


litecture. 


Master of 






Architecture in 


Urban De- 






sign. 


Doctor of Architecture 




The Shepherd 


B.M 


is./M.Mus. 


siniultane- 


Composition, conductmg. music history, per- 


School of Music 


ouslj 


, M.Mus. 




formance, theory 


Humanities and 










Social Sciences 










Anthropologrj' 


B.A. 






Anthropology, ethnology, archaeology, linguis- 
tics, physical anthropology 


Art and Art History 


B.A. 


Bachelor o 


Fine Arts 


Art history, studio art. film and photography 


Behavioral Science 


M.A 


Ph.D. (For B.A. see in- 


Anthropolog}', sociology 




terdepartmental 


major in 






Behavioral Science below) 




Economics 


B.A. 


M.A., Ph.D. 




Economics 


Education 


Master of Arts in 


Teaching 


Teacher preparatory programs in twenty 










subject-matter areas 


English 


B.A. 


M.A.. Ph.D. 




English 


French and Italian 


B.A. 


M.A.. Ph.D. 




French language and literature: Italian 
language 


German and Russian 


B.A. 


M.A.. Ph.D. 




German and Russian language, literature 


Health and Physical 


B.A. 






Physical education: health education as teaching 


Education 








field only 


History 


B.A. 


M.A., Ph.D. 




History '" ' 


Linguistics 


B.A. 






Linguistics 


Philosophy 


B.A. 


M.A., Ph.D. 




Philosophy 


Political Science 


B.A. 


M.A., Ph.D. 




Political science ,.;"'•, 


Psychology 


B.A. 


M.A., Ph.D. 




Psychology 


Religious Studies 


B.A. 


M.A., Ph.D. 




Religious studies ., , > ; 


Sociology 


B.A. 






Sociology 


Spanish, Portuguese 


B.A. 


M.A. 




Classics. Greek. Latin, Portuguese, and Spanish 


and Classics 










Interdepartmental 










Majors 










MAJORS 


DEGREES OFFERED 


SPONSORING DEPARTMENTS 


Area Majors 


B.A. 






Courses from two or more departments com- 
bined by the student and faculty advisers to 
form a coherent program with its own 
requirements 


Behavioral Science 


B.A. 






Anthropology, Psychology. Sociology 


Chemical Physics 


B.A. 






Chemistry, Physics 


Legal Studies 


B.A. 






Economics, History, Philosophy, Political 
Science 


Managerial Studies 


B.A. 






Accounting, Economics, Mathematical Sciences, 
Political Science. Psychology 


Materials Science 


B.A. 






Chemistry, Materials Science 



54 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

The School of Architecture encourages students to weigh their educational 
objectives and to choose among alternative courses of study offered. Further 
information on these programs may be found under Architecture in the Courses 
of Instruction section. 

Computer Science 

The computer science program is under the joint sponsorship of the depart- 
ments of Electrical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences with most of the 
courses in this area listed by both departments. Students wishing to specialize 
in computer science may earn a bachelor's degree by majoring in either depart- 
ment, and double majors are common. Both departments also offer a profes- 
sional master's, a research master's, and a doctor of philosophy degree. 

The program is divided into three subject areas: (1) hardware engineering, 
(2) software systems, and (3) discrete system modeling. Students will take 
courses from all three of these areas as well as related courses in engineering 
and mathematics. Detailed information on courses and degree requirements 
can be found under Mathematical Sciences or Electrical Engineering in the 
Courses of Instruction section. 

Engineering 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering at Rice offers through its five 
departments opportunities for a variety of curriculum and degree choices. 
Students interested in the engineering profession may major in chemical 
engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, 
or materials science for both undergraduate and graduate degrees. They may 
also take a double major combining environmental science with another science 
field. These programs lead to either the B.A. or B.S. degree, and may qualify 
students for further study leading to a fifth-year professional master's degree, 
a Master of Science degree, or a doctorate. 

During the first two years engineering students should consult with the 
chairmen of the departments of interest or with the special freshman and 
sophomore advisers appointed by each department for information and ad- 
vice about details of the programs and choice of electives, and about engineer- 
ing as a profession. 

Students may take a program of studies during their freshman year which 
satisfies the first year requirements for all engineering departments. A listing 
of these courses and other information regarding the first two years of study is 
found under Engineering and Applied Science in the Courses of Instruction 
section of this catalog. Degree requirements and advanced courses are listed 
under the separate departmental listings in the same section. 

Humanities and Social Sciences 

Majors are offered in anthropology, art and art history, behavioral science, 
biology, classics, economics, English, French, German, health and physical 
education, history, legal studies, linguistics, managerial studies, mathematics, 
philosophy, political science, psychology, religious studies, Russian, sociology, 
and Spanish. 

The requirements of each major may be found in the departmental 
listings under Courses of Instruction and are also available from department 
chairmen and from the Registrar's Office. The interdepartmental majors in 
legal studies and managerial studies are described below. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 55 



Legal Studies :i 

The program in legal studies is intended to offer undergraduates an 
opportunity to obtain understanding and insight into the development and 
character of modern society and modern values, through the study of the 
humanistic and social science parameters of the law and of its associated 
institutions. It is an interdepartmental program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Courses are drawn from the departments of Anthropology, Economics, 
Environmental Engineering, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychol- 
ogy, and Sociology. The degree may be taken as a terminal degree or in 
preparation for law school or graduate work in one of those disciplines. 
Students contemplating graduate work are strongly advised to consider the 
possibility of a double major. Students should consult the Legal Studies section 
under Courses of Instruction for the list of requirements. 

The administration of the program is in the hands of a committee consisting 
of representatives of the departments of Economics. History. Philosophy, and 
Political Science. Professor Baruch A. Brody, chairman of the Department of 
Philosophy, is chairman of this committee. Students interested in Legal Studies 
should see Professor Brody, who will assign them an adviser closely related to 
the area within legal studies that they wish to emphasize. 



Managerial Studies 

The managerial studies program is intended to prepare students for 
management careers in either business or government. The program is inter- 
departmental and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, either as a terminal 
degree or in preparation for graduate professional studies in accounting, law, 
business, or public management. Courses are drawn from the departments of 
Accounting, Economics, Mathematical Sciences, Political Science, and 
Psychology. 

The program is designed to provide students with a comprehensive under- 
standing both of the environment in which business firms operate and of the 
tools employed by management in making decisions. To major in managerial 
studies, students must complete forty-five semester hours of approved course- 
work in the following subject areas: (1) accounting, (2) economics, (3) finance, 
(4) statistics, (5) quantative methods, (6) computer programming, (7) business 
law, and (8) industrial-organizational psychology. A list of approved courses is 
available from the Office of the Dean, Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of 
Administration, 232 Herman Brown Hall, or from the managerial studies 
program advisers in each of the participating departments. 

An honors program is available in managerial studies. This program is 
designed (1) to provide students with the opportunity to enrich and expand 
their knowledge of the managerial disciplines by means of specified advanced- 
level coursework and/or independent research and writing, and (2) to provide 
an opportunity for the recognition of students who have demonstrated unusual 
competency in managerial studies. 

The managerial studies program is administered by a committee con- 
sisting of representatives from the departments of Accounting, Economics, 
Mathematical Sciences, Political Science, and Psychology. Dean Robert R. 
Sterling, of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration, is chairman 
of this committee. Student records for all managerial studies majors are main- 
tained in the Jones School. The managerial studies program coordinator assigns 



56 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

students an adviser closely related to the area in which they intend to specialize. 
Students should consult with their adviser as early as possible to ensure estab- 
lishment of an appropriate plan of study. 

Music 

The Bachelor of Music is offered by the Shepherd School of Music only in 
conjunction with the Master of Music, both of which are awarded simultane- 
ously upon completion of a five-year program of professional studies. All 
music majors are required to take the school's core curriculum, which spans the 
first five semesters. 

The final two years are devoted to specialization and can be entered only 
upon passing qualifying examinations administered in the fifth or sixth semes- 
ter. Students in the specialized curriculum may elect to be performance 
majors or applied majors (composition, conducting, music history, theory). 
Students specializing in conducting may require a sixth year to complete the 
degrees. 

More detailed information about the Shepherd School and the require- 
ments for degrees is given under Music in the Courses of Instruction section of 
this catalog. 

Natural Sciences 

Majors included in this program are biochemistry, biology, chemical 
physics, chemistry, geology, mathematical sciences, mathematics, and physics. 
The requirements for each major are outlined under departmental listings in 
Courses of Instruction. 

Other Options: Area, Double, Interdisciplinary Majors 

In deciding on a major, students are encouraged to select a course of study 
directed toward their personal goals and abilities. Several options are available 
besides the normal major in most departments. Further information on these 
may be found in the departmental listings. 

1. Double majors that fulfill the major requirements of two departments. 
The two majors may but need not be in related fields: for example, 
economics/math science, or biology/art and art history. 

2. Interdepartmental and interdisciplinary majors. Interdepartmental 
majors are offered in chemistry with materials science and physics, and in 
electrical engineering with biology. Behavioral science, legal studies, lin- 
guistics, and managerial studies are interdisciplinary majors, combining 
courses taught by faculty from several departments. 

3. Areas of concentration within departmental majors. Certain majors, in- 
cluding architecture, geology, German, physics, and Spanish, but not 
limited to these, have a choice of different areas of concentration with 
different course requrements within the department major. 

4. Area majors. Instead of selecting an established departmental major or 
double major, students have the option of developing an area major which 
is closer to their particular interests and career goals. Whereas double 
majors must conform to the requirements of both departments, an area 
major is a single major combining courses from two or more departments 
which form a clearly coherent program with its own major requirements. 

An area major is normally initiated by the student and worked out in 
conjunction with faculty advisers from each of the departments involved. 
Together they must agree on a title, which will then designate the area 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 57 

major on the student's transcript, followed by the names of cooperat- 
ing departments: for example. Problems of the Contemporary City (archi- 
tecture, sociology, environmental science, and engineering). The require- 
ments for each area major are approved by the faculty advisers, who are 
jointly responsible for the validity and acceptability of the program as a 
degree plan. In addition, students who elect to take an area major must also 
complete university semester-hour (or course) and distribution re- 
quirements. 

Though students normally choose their majors at the end of the 
sophomore year, it is often possible to change from a departmental major 
to a related area major in the junior year. Students who might want to 
develop an area major but are uncertain which departments to approach, 
or students who wish to change from a departmental major to an area 
major, should consult with the coordinator of academic advising. The 
registrar routinely routes all application forms for area majors through 
the coordinator's office for certification. 

Premedical, Prelaw, and Other Preprofessional Programs 

In addition to the preprofessional and professional programs offered by 
Rice in accounting, architecture, engineering, and music, a student may pur- 
sue a program which will satisfy the requirements for admission to graduate 
professional schools in business, dentistry, diplomacy and foreign affairs, 
finance, health science, law. or medicine. Information about preparation for a 
career in business or finance can beobtainedfrom the dean of the Jesse H.Jones 
Graduate School of Administration. 

The premedical adviser counsels students interested in premedical or 
predental studies and other areas of the health sciences. Those interested in 
legal studies should consult the prelaw adviser. Both advisers may be contacted 
through their offices in the RMC courtyard. 

Premedical and Predental Programs. The entrance requirements of 
medical and dental colleges of the United States are limited to a relatively few 
courses: one year each of general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, 
mathematics, biology, and English, and laboratories required by the foregoing 
science courses. Because medical and dental schools show little or no prefer- 
ence for any one major, students planning a medical or dental career have the 
opportunity to choose their major solely on the basis of their interests and 
capabilities. They should keep two objectives in mind: (1) to secure a broadly- 
based cultural background and (2) to master the necessary skills for an alterna- 
tive career. Those who elect to concentrate in the sciences or engineering will 
automatically satisfy most of the entrance requirements. Students concentrat- 
ing in the humanities need to make some adjustments in their study plan in 
order to fulfill the entrance requirements. Premedical and predental students 
are advised to discuss their plans with the premedical adviser. 

An undergraduate major in bioengineering offered by the Electrical En- 
gineering Department is specifically designed for those students who want to 
combine a future career in the health sciences with a basic preparation in 
electronics, systems analysis, and control theory. A specific program in prepa- 
ration for medical school is included. Details are available from the chairman 
of the department. 

In a few cases students may be granted admission to the Baylor College of 
Medicine or another accredited medical school at the end of the junior year. 
Through prior arrangement with the Committee on Examinations and 
Standing, a student may become a candidate for the B.A degree at Rice upon 



58 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

completion of the M.D. degree. For details of the requirements and procedure, 
an interested student should consult the premedical adviser. 

Prelaw Studies. The academic requirement for admission to law school is 
satisfied by all degree programs offered at Rice. While many students major in 
history, political science, economics, accounting, or legal studies as a base for 
prelaw studies, no law school specifies particular courses or curricula as pre- 
requisite to admission. Most require only a baccalaureate degree and the Law 
School Admission Test. 

In a few cases students may be granted admission to the Columbia Univer- 
sity School of Law or another accredited law school at the end of the junior 
year. Through prior arrangement with the Committee on Examinations and 
Standing, a student may become a candidate for the B.A. degree from Rice upon 
completion of a law degree. For details of the requirements and procedure, an 
interested student should consult the prelaw adviser. 

The Prelaw Handbook, published by the Association of American Law 
Schools and the Law School Admission Council, states that pre-legal education 
should develop oral and written comprehension and expression, creative 
thinking and critical understanding of human values, and that no one disci- 
pline is uniquely concerned with those objectives. Therefore, the prelaw stu- 
dent should strive for development of his or her own capabilities and thorough 
concentration in the areas of greatest interest. Interested students should 
contact the prelaw adviser early, preferably in the first year, for assistance in 
designing a suitable program. The Prelaw Handbook and catalogs of many 
leading law schools are available in the Prelaw Office in the RMC courtyard. 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps Programs 

Rice University offers two Reserve Officers' Training Corps programs — 
the Army and the Navy. These programs seek to train college students so that 
upon graduation they may qualify as commissioned officers in a component of 
the United States Army, Navy, or Marine Corps. The Navy has two categories 
of midshipmen, one working toward a reserve commission and the other 
toward a regular commission. The Army normally awards reserve commis- 
sions: however, certain selected distinguished military students may be offered 
commissions in the regular Army. 

Any student suspended by the university for academic failure or other 
cause is immediately disenrolled from the ROTC programs. Any student 
performing unsatisfactory work in military science or naval science courses, or 
possessing unsatisfactory officerlike qualities, may be disenrolled from ROTC 
programs regardless of the quality of academic work. Enrollment in the ROTC 
programs at Rice University is normally made at the beginning of the fall term. 

Students completing the full program in either Military Science or Naval 
Science will be granted the equivalent of two course credits toward their 
degree. Such credit is not attached to specific courses, and no other degree 
credit will be given for Military Science or Naval Science programs. 

Additional information regarding the ROTC programs and scholarships 
available is given under Military Science and Naval Science in the Courses of 
Instruction section of this catalog. 

Teacher Certification 

Programs of study are offered to fulfill the Texas state requirements for 
teaching certificates on the secondary level in biology, chemistry, earth science, 
economics, English, French, German, health education, history, Latin, 
mathematics, physical education, physics, political science, psychology, 
Russian, general science, social studies, sociology, and Spanish. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 59 



Programs with Other Universities 

Rice currently participates in cooperative programs with several other 
colleges and universities at the undergraduate level. These include programs 
with Swarthmore College, Texas Southern University, Trinity College of 
Cambridge University, and Williams College. 

Rice-Swarthmore Exchange Program 

An exchange program between Rice and Swarthmore College has been 
arranged for qualified students beyond the freshman year who are interested 
in spending a semester in another part of the country. Swarthmore, which is 
situated on a wooded campus near Philadelphia, is a nondenominational 
coeducational college with academic standards similar to those at Rice. 

The exchange is for the fall semester only. Rice students apply in January 
by submitting their own letter of application and two supporting letters, one 
from a faculty member in their major department and one from another 
member of the faculty. The exchange is on a one-for-one basis with each 
student continuing to pay all charges and fees to his or her home school. Rice 
students chosen for the exchange may take with them to Swarthmore any 
financial aid from Rice for which they may be eligible. 

Prior approval of transfer credit should be requested for each course from 
the registrar. Courses to be taken at Swarthmore which will apply to the 
student's major must also be approved by the department. Students who enroll 
in the normal program of four four-semester-hour courses at Swarthmore 
receive upon satisfactory completion sixteen semester hours (or five courses) 
toward their Rice degree with a notation of specific courses which may count for 
fulfillment of major requirements or distribution within that block credit. 

Dual Degree Program with Texas Southern University 

A dual-degree program with Texas Southern University, a predomin- 
antly minority institution in Houston, enables students to attend T.S.U. for 
three years, majoring in mathematics, physics, or chemistry. At the end of 
the third year, if their work has been satisfactory, the students transfer to Rice 
as juniors in engineering. After five years, a student will normally receive a B.S. 
in some branch of engineering from Rice and a B.S. in mathematics, physics, or 
chemistry from Texas Southern. 

While the students are still enrolled at Texas Southern, generally during 
their third year, they will take two or more courses at Rice in order to prepare 
themselves for their engineering majors here. 

This program may lead to an additional year at Rice for the professional 
master's degree. It also prepares a student for graduate work at Rice or any 
other institution offering graduate work in engineering. 

C. D. Broad Exchange Program with Trinity College, Cambridge 

An exchange program sponsored by the Abraham Student Aid Founda- 
tion involves both students and faculty from Rice and from Trinity College, 
Cambridge. Student participation, available through receipt of a competitive 
award, confers one year of study as a visiting student at Rice or at Trinity 
College. During 1978-1979 a student from Cambridge will study at Rice; Rice 
students may apply to study at Trinity the following year. Similar but 



60 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

shorter exchanges of Rice and Cambridge faculty members will also be 
arranged through the program. 

Further information on the program may be obtained from Professor 
David L. Minter, English Department, Rice's coordinator for the program. 

Program with Williams College 

In 1976 a five-year program with Williams College was established leading 
to a B.S. degree in one of the various branches of engineering from Rice and a 
B.A. degree from Williams awarded jointly after three years at Williams and 
two at Rice. Students applying for the program must submit applications and 
fulfill all the qualifications for admission to Rice as transfer students. 



Academic Regulations 



All students seeking an undergraduate degree are subject to the academic 
regulations of the university. The Committee on Examinations and Standing 
administers the rules described below. Under unusual circumstances any stu- 
dent may submit a written petition to the committee requesting special consid- 
eration. All correspondence with the committee should be addressed in care of 
the Dean of Undergraduate Affairs. 

Registration 

Currently enrolled students must complete preliminary registration in 
April for the following semester. Unless a special tuition plan has been elected, 
all tuition and fees for the fall semester must be paid by August 14, 1978. 
Charges for the spring semester are payable December 29, 1978. A student who 
does not file a course program or request a delay from the registrar by the 
established deadline will be considered withdrawn from the university by 
default. To be readmitted the student must be eligible to continue and must 
pay a $25 reinstatement fee. 

Entering students complete their preliminary registration during orienta- 
tion for new students the week before classes begin in August. 

All students must file a final course registration by the end of the second 
week of classes. Any student who fails to comply with this requirement will be 
assessed the $25 reinstatement fee. A student who changes registration after 
the second week of classes will be charged a fee of $10 for each add/drop form 
submitted, unless the change is a result of a revision in the course offerings or 
class schedules of the university. 

Each student's course registration card must be signed by his or her faculty 
adviser. Freshmen and sophomores should have their registration approved 
by the faculty adviser assigned to them in their college. Juniors and seniors 
have faculty advisers in their major departments. Entering transfer students 
will be assigned advisers according to their class standing. Freshman students 
in architecture and music must also consult faculty advisers in their respective 
fields. Freshmen in engineering must consult faculty advisers in their intended 
fields of engineering. 

The end of the fourth week is the final deadline for late registration or for 
registering in additional courses. A student may drop courses as late as the 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 61 

end of the tenth week but must secure permission through the Dean of Under- 
graduate Affairs to continue the semester with fewer than twelve semester 
hours (four courses). See Course Programs below. 

The above regulations and fees may be suspended for a student who wishes 
to change majors. 



Course Programs 

Students at Rice normally enroll in fifteen to seventeen semester hours (five 
courses) each semester and thus in eight semesters complete the requirements 
for graduation in their major. Students wishing to register or to be enrolled 
at any time during the semester for less than twelve or more than twenty 
semester hours (less than four or more than six courses of at least three semester 
hours each) must secure approval from the Committee on Examinations and 
Standing through the Dean of Undergraduate Affairs. 

A student who enters with advanced placement credits, takes an overload 
during the regular term, or enrolls in additional courses in summer school may 
be able to fulfill the requirements for graduation in less than eight semesters. A 
student enrolled in fewer than five courses may make up the work in a sub- 
sequent semester or in summer school or by continuing beyond the normal 
four years. 

A student on academic probation is not allowed to enroll in more than 
seventeen semester hours (five courses). A student who receives two or more 
"incomplete" grades in a semester is not eligible to enroll in more than fourteen 
semester hours (four courses) in the semester immediately following. 

Courses in ROTC are not included in determining the number of semester 
hours of enrollment in a semester. 



Transfer Credit, Including Credit for 
Summer School Courses Not Taken at Rice 

The basis for approval of transfer credit toward a Rice undergraduate 
degree for courses taken at another college or university is equivalence in 
content and semester-hour credit to a corresponding Rice course. Transfer 
credit for no more than fourteen semester hours (four courses of at least three 
semester hours each) taken during the summer at an accredited college or 
university other than Rice will be granted if the courses are individually 
acceptable for transfer credit. 

Students who wish to take courses at another university during an 
approved leave of absence or during the summer are advised to secure prior 
approval of transfer credit from the registrar by submitting the name of the 
school and the list of specific courses for which credit is requested. If courses 
taken elsewhere are to count as part of the student's major requirements, 
written approval for transfer credit must also be secured from the appropriate 
department. 

Prior approval is recommended but not required. Courses may be submit- 
ted for transfer credit after the work has been completed. Final approval of 
credit will be granted and entered on the student's permanent record when the 
registrar receives an official transcript verifying completion of the work with a 
grade equivalent to C or better. 

Students transferring to Rice from another college or university should 
apply to the registrar for transfer credit on the same basis. 

Financial aid from Rice is not available for courses taken at another school. 



62 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Approval of Degree Plans and Majors 

At the time of preliminary registration in April each year continuing 
students must file a complete degree plan with the registrar and with their 
major department or college (freshmen only). The degree plan must be 
approved by the student's adviser and must include: (1) major(s), (2) courses 
completed to date, (3) proposed courses for each subsequent year which will 
show when major requirements and distribution requirements will be met, and 
(4) the expected date of graduation. 

A student who wishes to propose a degree plan which varies from the 
normal requirements for the degree sought may submit it with appropriate 
explanation and justification to the Committee on Examinations and Standing 
for approval. 

A student's degree plan, including the student's choice of major, may be 
changed at any time by filing a new, properly approved plan with the registrar. 

Final Examinations 

Final examinations are given in most courses, but the decision to give a final 
examination as a required part of the course rests with the instructor and the 
department. 

No student may be required to take a final examination before the official 
examination period as scheduled on the academic calendar, nor may an in- 
structor require that a take-home final examination be returned before 5:00 
p.m. on the last day of the scheduled examination period. These restrictions do 
not apply to laboratory examinations. 

All tests and examinations are conducted under the honor system. 

Grade Symbol and the Pass-Fail Option 

1 very high standing P pass 

2 high standing F failure 

3 satisfactory standing WD withdrawn without prejudice 

4 low standing INC incomplete 

5 failure * other 

Any student may enroll in one course of not more than four semester hours 
on a pass-fail basis in any four semesters of the normal eight-semester program. 
This option does not apply to the required courses taken within a student's 
major department nor to related required courses in other departments which 
the major department may specify as not available for the pass-fail option. 
Students wishing to enroll on a pass-fail basis in a course of more than four 
semester hours may apply to the Committee on Examinations and Standing 
for approval. 

Courses are designated as taken under the pass-fail option by filing the 
proper form in the Registrar's Office no later than the end of the fourth week 
of classes. Any course so designated may be converted back to a numerical 
grade prior to the end of the tenth week. 

A grade of "incomplete" is reported to the registrar by the instructor when 
a student has not been able to complete a course because of illness or other 
circumstances beyond the student's control during the semester. Such work 
must be completed and a numerical grade reported by the end of the fifth week 
of the next semester; otherwise the "incomplete" is automatically converted 
to 5. 

A grade of "other" may be given if a student fails to appear for the final 
examination after completing all the other work of a course, or if the registrar 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 63 

has not received grades from the instructor at the time the grade reports are 
prepared. A designation of "other" must be resolved promptly after the end of 
the semester; otherwise it will be converted to 5. 

Students with designations of "incomplete" or "other" should be aware 
that they may go on probation or suspension for the previous semester when 
these are changed to numerical grades. 

President's Honor Roll 

Outstanding students are recognized each semester through the publica- 
tion of the President's Honor Roll. In order to be eligible, students must have 
number grades in a total of twelve or more semester hours, laboratories and 
courses of less than three semester hours included, and must not have any 
grade of 5 or F. Approximately 30 percent of all undergraduates will be eligible. 
The exact cut-off each semester is to be determined by the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing on the basis of grade point averages provided by 
the Registrar's Office. A designation of P will not affect a student's eligibility 
one way or the other, nor will it figure in the calculation of the student's grade 
point average for the semester. Grades in freshman Physical Education and 
ROTC courses will not be counted in the required number grades for twelve 
or more semester hours, nor in calculating a student's grade point average for 
the semester. 

Academic Probation 

A student will be placed on academic probation if at the end of any semester: 

1. the student fails more than 25 percent of his or her course program for the 
semester, calculated according to semester hours, or 

2. the student does not earn grades of P, 3-, or better in at least 50 percent 
of his or her course program for the semester, calculated according to 
semester hours. 

Students who earn grades which would place them on probation a third 
time are automatically suspended from the university. 

The period of probation extends to the end of the next semester in which 
the student is enrolled at the university. A student on probation is not permit- 
ted to be a candidate for nor to hold any elective or appointive office. This 
restriction is also embodied in the constitution of the Student Association. 



Academic Suspension 

A student will be suspended from the university if at the end of any 
semester: 

1. the student is failing in more than half of his or her course program for the 
semester, calculated according to semester hours, or 

2. the student earns grades which would place him or her on probation a 
third time. 

Provision 1 does not apply to undergraduate students at the end of their 
first semester at Rice. 

Students who are suspended are normally required to withdraw for a 
period of at least one semester. Readmission after suspension is subject to ap- 
proval of the Committee on Examinations and Standing. 



64 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

To obtain readmission, the student should address a letter of petition to 
the committee at least a month before the beginning of classes, and at the same 
time request two supporting letters from persons under whom the student has 
worked or with whom the student has been associated in the interval of the 
suspension. If the problems causing the previous academic difficulty appear, 
upon proper consultation, to have been relieved, the student is generally 
readmitted. In some instances approval of readmisson may be postponed, or 
suspension may be permanent. 

If a student who has previously been suspended earns grades which would 
result in probation, the student will automatically be suspended a second 
time. The period of second suspension will be at least two semesters. 

A student desiring special consideration with regard to readmission fol- 
lowing suspension should petition the committee in writing. 



Readmission Involving Disciplinary or 
Other Nonacademie Considerations 

Petitions for readmisson following suspension, voluntary withdrawal, or a 
leave of absence beyond two years, which involve disciplinary or other non- 
academic considerations, may be subject to review by the Proctor before final 
approval by the Committee on Examinations and Standing. 



Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmission 

A student may withdraw voluntarily from the university at any time 
during the semester up until the last day of classes and, if in good academic 
standing at the time of withdrawal, the student will normally be readmitted 
upon written application to the Committee on Examinations and Standing. 

Any student desiring to withdraw should inform the college master in 
person and give written notification of withdrawal to the Dean of Under- 
graduate Affairs, who will notify other offices of the university as necessary. If 
the student withdraws within five weeks of the final examination period, class 
grades as of the date of withdrawal will be considered in determining eligi- 
bility for readmission. Students who fail to give notice of withdrawal should 
expect to receive failing grades. 



Leave of Absence 

A student may request a leave of absence from the university by applying 
in writing to the Committee on Examinations and Standing at any time prior 
to the first day of classes in the semester which marks the beginning of the 
leave. Leave from the university after the beginning of the semester is consider- 
ed a voluntary withdrawal. 

To be readmitted following an approved leave of absence of not more than 
four semesters, students need only notify the Dean of Undergraduate Affairs 
of their intention to return at least one month before the beginning of the 
semester. After four semesters, they should apply in writing to the Committee 
on Examinations and Standing, as in the case of a voluntary withdrawal. 

Approval of a leave of absence is always contingent on the student's satis- 
factory completion of course work in the semester preceding the leave; other- 
wise the approved leave may be converted to suspension. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 65 

Graduation 

To be recommended for any bachelor's degree, students must have earned 
grades of 3 or better in at least 50 percent of the work prescribed for the 
degree, including grades of 3 or better in at least 50 percent of the advanced 
work in their major field, calculated by semester hours. 

A student must complete a total of at least 120 semester hours, including 
48 semester hours (fourteen courses of at least three semester hours each) in 
advanced courses, in order to qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree. Students 
enrolled in a program leading to a degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the 
various branches of engineering should check with the appropriate depart- 
ment concerning graduation requirements. 

Students must be registered with the university in the semester im- 
mediately preceding the awarding of their degrees. Students who have com- 
pleted their degree requirements in the summer or fall prior to that semester, 
or who are completing their senior year at another college or university by 
special arrangement with the Committee on Examinations and Standing, 
must register on campus or by mail for a no-tuition course DGRE 498b, in 
order to be listed as degree candidates. They will be charged a $50 registration 
fee and a diploma fee. 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing reviews each student's 
record at the time of graduation and recommends to the faculty outstanding 
students to be granted degrees cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum 
laude. 



Rice Tutorial Program 



Departments with major teaching assignments provide tutoring to fresh- 
men having academic difficulty. Each participating department names a 
faculty tutor who is responsible for organizing tutoring activities and assign- 
ing students who need tutoring to groups or individual tutors. Assignments 
are made on a mutually agreeable basis after consultation. 

Anyone may recommend or request tutoring for an individual freshman. 
Students who feel they need help may request it themselves. The normal pro- 
cedure is to consult with the course instructor or the department tutor first; 
however, the college liaison associate and the program coordinator are avail- 
able for consultation and assistance. 

Each residential college selects a faculty associate who has agreed to 
serve in a liaison capacity. The faculty member seeks ways to aid communica- 
tion and help advise freshmen who may need tutoring. The entire tutoring 
program is under the supervision of a faculty member who acts as program 
coordinator. 

Information concerning the tutorial program may be secured from the 
Office of Student Advising and Student Activities. 



Admission of New Students 



From its very beginning Rice University has sought to maintain an 
academic program of the highest order of excellence for a small body of stu- 
dents. This number has grown with the expansion of the university's resources 
over the past decade, but the total number of students admitted to Rice still 
remains relatively small — approximately 500 students in each freshman class. 



66 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

In making its selections, the Admissions Committee attempts to seek out 
and identify students who have demonstrated exceptional ability and the 
potential for personal and intellectual growth. There is no discrimination 
whatever on the basis of sex, race, or creed. Decisions are based not only on 
high school grades and test scores but also on such qualities as leadership, 
participation in extracurricular activities, and personal creativity. The 
university's aim is diversity rather than uniformity, and it believes that stu- 
dents learn from each other and from the life of the residential colleges, as well 
as from their classes and laboratories. 

Students are selected on a competitive basis under admissions quotas in 
(1) architecture; (2) humanities and social sciences; (3) engineering; (4) music; 
and (5) science. Applicants should give careful consideration to the category 
under which they wish to be considered. Students, however, are free to change 
from one of these areas to another, after consultation with their adviser. Only 
architecture and music have strictly limited enrollments. Occasionally physi- 
cal limitations of other departments may make it necessary to limit enroll- 
ment of majors in some departments. 

There are four basic measures used in admissions: (1) scholastic record as 
reflected by the courses chosen and the quality of performance; (2) scores on 
the Scholastic Aptitude and Achievement Tests administered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board; (3) evaluations made by teachers and coun- 
selors; (4) personal interviews and the student's statements about his or her 
interests, experience, and goals. The Admissions Committee is particularly 
interested in any information that can give insight into the extracurricular 
areas of development and such unmeasurable factors as motivation, intellec- 
tual curiosity, and character. 

1. The High School Record. The completion of not less than sixteen 
acceptable units is required. The record must include the following units: 



English 4 Laboratory science 2 

Social Studies 2 (biology, chemistry, physics, etc.) 

Mathematics (algebra, geometry) 3 Additional credits in above- 
A foreign language 2 listed subjects 3 

Total 16 



Preparation in chemistry, physics, trigonometry, and additional advanced 
mathematics courses is required of applicants for the engineering and science 
divisions. 



2. Entrance Examinations. The required entrance examinations are 
administered by the College Entrance Examination Board. Formal arrange- 
ment for applying to take the C.E.E.B. examinations, as well as for paying 
fees, is a matter between the applicant and the College Entrance Examination 
Board. The C.E.E.B. bulletins and test applications are available from high 
school counseling offices. They may also be obtained in the Rice Admissions 
Office. 



ADMISSIONOFNEWSTUDENTS 67 

The following examinations are required according to the curriculum 
selected: 

A. Humanities, Social Sciences, B. Science and Engineering 
Architecture, and Music 

(1) Scholastic Aptitude Test (1) Scholastic Aptitude Test 

(2) Three achievement tests as (2) Three achievement tests as 
follows: follows: 

(a) English composition * (a) English composition * 

(b) any two of the following: (b) Mathematics 

A foreign language (Level I or Level II) 

American history and (c) Chemistry or physics 

European history and 
■■ " world cultures 

Literature *with or without essay 

Mathematics 

A science 

The courses of study and majors offered may be found on pages 103 through 
264. 

3. Evaluations from High School Counselors and Teachers. Rating 
sheets submitted by the applicant's high school teachers and counselors are 
considered in connection with every application. 

4. Personal Interviews. Interviews are an integral part of the admission 
procedure. They enable the Committee on Admissions to reach a decision 
based on nonacademic, as well as academic, aspects of the candidate's de- 
velopment. The candidate should arrange for an interview in compliance with 
the admissions calendar on page 69. Campus interviews will be held at 109 
Lovett Hall between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, and until 11:30 on Saturday mornings. (Summer schedule: Monday 
through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.) Applicants who cannot visit the 
university or who are unable to meet with a traveling member of the admis- 
sions staff may be interviewed by alumni interviewers located throughout the 
United States and in several foreign countries. If an applicant cannot be 
interviewed by one of these methods, the interview will be waived. Candidates 
for admission to the Shepherd School of Music must arrange for an audition 
and interview with the music faculty. 

Early Decision Plan 

The Early Decision Plan is open to candidates for admission who regard 
Rice University as their first choice and will await the outcome of their appli- 
cation to Rice before applying elsewhere. 

Students applying for the fall semester 1979 under the Early Decision 
Plan must complete the required College Board Examinations on or before 
June 3, 1978. Applications for admisson may be filed between July 1 and 
October 1. Admission notices will be mailed soon after November 15, 1978. 

Requirements for admisson will not be altered by an early decison. Those 
accepted will be expected to complete the remainder of their high school work 
with superior performance. 

Early Decision candidates who apply for financial aid will be notified of 
admisson in mid-November but may have to wait until December 1 to be 
notified of their financial aid package. 



68 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Action on some applications may be deferred until the Regular Decision 
period if the Admissions Committee does not have adequate grounds for an 
affirmative decision in November. An additional semester of the high school 
record and additional C.E.E.B. scores from the November, December, or 
January tests may be added for later consideration. The applicant would, of 
course, be released from the pledge to apply only to Rice. 

An applicant offered admisson under the Early Decision Plan must make 
a $100 nonrefundable registration deposit within 30 days in order to hold his or 
her place in the incoming freshman class. Those who wish to reserve a room 
on campus must make an additional $50 deposit. 



Interim Decision Plan 

Applicants who complete their SAT and Achievement Tests by December 
and who file the application for admission before December 1 will be consid- 
ered in the Interim Decision Plan and be notified of the outcome by Febru- 
ary 9. 

An applicants offered minimum under this plan must make a $100 regis- 
tration deposit by March 10. This deposit is not refundable after March 10. 
Those who wish to reserve a room on campus must make an additional $50 
deposit. 



Regular Decision Plan 

Regular Decision applications completed by February 1 will be considered 
before April 10. Applications received after February 1 will be considered 
only after all earlier applications. Candidates who apply after February 1 must 
do so in full knowledge that they are in a highly speculative position. 

Applicants not accepted under the especially stringent guidelines for 
Early Decision and Interim Decision will normally be advised to keep their 
applications alive until all applicants can be considered. Regular Decision 
applicants who are offered admission should make a $100 registration deposit 
by May 1 to reserve their places in the incoming class. This deposit is not 
refundable after May 1. Those who wish to reserve a room on campus must 
make and additional $50 deposit. 




ADMISSIONS OF NEW STUDENTS 69 



Admissions Calendar 



EARLY 


INTERIM 


REGULAR 




DECISION 


DECISION 


DECISION 


TRANSFER 


Application by 


Application by 


Application by 


Application by 


October 1 


December 1 


February 1 


November 1. for 
midterm, April 2 
for fall 


Interview by 


Interview by 


Interview by 


Interview by 


October 16 


January 1 


March 1 


Nov. 1 for mid- 
term, April 2 for 
fall 


Required SAT & 


Required SAT & 


Required SAT & 


Required SAT 


Achievement 


Achievement Tests 


Achievement Tests 


if never pre- 


Tests in the 


completed by the 


completed by the 


viously taken 


junior year by 


December test date 


January test date 




May & June 








Notification of 


Notification of 


Notification of 


Notification 


admission mailed 


admission mailed 


admission mailed 


in early May 


November 15 


February 9 


April 10 




Financial Aid 


F.A.F. filed by 


F.A.F. filed by 


Notification 


Form filed by 


January 15, Finan- 


February 1. Finan- 


when admitted; 


October 1 Financial 


cial Aid notification 


cial Aid notification 


allow two 


Aid notification 


by February 9 


by April 10 


months after 


by December 1 






filing F.A.F. 


Deposit within 30 


Deposit within 30 


Deposit refundable 


Nonrefundable 


days nonrefundable 


davs nonrefundable 


until May 1 (Candi- 


$100 deposit 


after May 1 




dates Reply Date) 


within 30 days 



No application fee is required of candidates for admission to Rice. 

The $50 room deposit is due on the same date as the registration deposit. The room deposit may be refunded or 

credited to the applicant's account until such time as a room is assigned to the applicant. 



Advanced Placement 

Entering freshmen who have done work well beyond the usual high school 
courses in certain subjects and who make a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced 
Placement Examinations offered by C.E.E.B. and taken prior to matricula- 
tion at Rice, will be given university credit toward graduation for appropriate 
Rice courses satisfying distribution or free elective requirements. Acceptance 
of such credit in fulfillment of a student's major requirements is subject to 
approval by the department in question. Credit for specific courses at Rice will 
depend upon which advanced placement examination was successfully com- 
pleted. 

Students, who make high scores on the College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) tests in chemistry may, at the discretion of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment, receive advanced placement and college credit in chemistry. Students 
with high scores on a departmental examination in biology administered by 
the Rice Biology Department to entering students will have the opportunity 
to take the CLEP test in biology and may on the basis of their CLEP scores 



70 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

receive degree credit as well as advanced placement in biology. College credit 
is not given for any other CLEP examinations at this time. No degree credit for 
introductory courses in chemistry or biology on the basis of CLEP scores will 
be granted to students who have taken more advanced college work in the 
subject. 

During orientation week at the beginning of the academic year, entering 
students may take advanced placement tests administered by various depart- 
ments at Rice. On the basis of these tests students may be advised to register in 
courses beyond the introductory level. College credit is not given for these tests. 



Transfer Students 

Rice University encourages application from students with superior rec- 
ords who wish to transfer from a junior college or a four-year college or 
university. Interested students should request a transfer application form 
from the Office of Admissions. 

Applicants should file an application before April 1 if they plan to request 
admission in the following fall semester. Applications must be accompanied by 
official transcripts showing all college level work completed to date and 
courses in progress. Decisions regarding transfer applications for admission to 
the spring semester are usually made during November. For the fall semester 
notification of admission is made by early May. 

The criteria used in evaluating transfer applications are essentially the 
same as those applied to applicants for the freshman class, except that special 
emphasis is given to performance at the college level. Scholastic Aptitude Test 
scores are required. If candidates have not previously taken C.E.E.B. tests, 
they must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test no later than January if they wish 
to apply for admission in the fall. Achievement Tests are not required. 

Transfer students must be registered in residence at Rice for at least four 
full semesters during the fall or spring terms, and must complete not less than 
fifty-two semester hours (sixteen courses of three or more semester hours each) 
for a Rice degree. 

For further information or application forms, prospective candidates for 
admission as undergraduates should communicate with the Office of Admis- 
sions. When requesting application forms, candidates should clearly indicate 
that they are prospective transfers from another college. 



Visiting Students 

Students who wish to spend a semester or a year at Rice taking courses for 
credit to be applied toward their undergraduate degree at another school 
should apply for admission as visiting students through the Office of Admis- 
sions. The student's application should be accompanied by an official tran- 
script of college work to date and a letter from the student's academic dean or 
registrar agreeing to grant transfer credit subject to satisfactory performance. 

Visiting students will be assigned membership in a college during their 
stay and will be charged the same fees as other undergraduates. In a few clas- 
ses where enrollment is limited because of space or other considerations, 
candidates for Rice degrees will have priority over visiting students. Finan- 
cial Aid is not available for visiting students. 



ADMISSION OF NEW STUDENTS 71 

Class III Students 

Class III standing at Rice University designates students with an under- 
graduate or graduate degree from an accredited college or university who are 
taking courses for credit but not in a specific degree program. The university 
keeps a permanent record of such courses and will send a transcript of that 
record anywhere on request from the student. Courses taken as a Class III 
student may be used to prepare for advanced degree work or to satisfy require- 
ments for admission into a graduate program. However a graduate degree may 
not be earned through the Class III program nor may such work be credited 
toward resident requirements at Rice until the student has applied to the ap- 
propriate department, been recommended for admission, and been officially 
admitted by the Graduate Council. 

Although most undergraduate courses and some graduate courses are 
open to Class III students, in a few classes and laboratories where enrollment 
is limited because of space or other considerations, candidates for Rice degrees 
will have priority over Class III students. 

Application for admission as a Class III student should be submitted to the 
Office of the Dean of Advanced Studies and Research. For information on 
tuition and fees for Class III students, see page 73. Financial Aid is not avail- 
able for Class III students. 



Admission of High School Students to Take Courses for Credit 

Accelerated high school juniors and seniors who have taken all the courses 
in a given discipline available to them in high school, or who have completed 
their high school graduation requirements, may request admission to Rice for 
the purpose of taking one or more university level courses on the same basis as 
Rice undergraduates. Such courses will be graded for credit, and the univer- 
sity will send a transcript of this record on request by the student to any college 
or university. If the high school student is later admitted to Rice, any such 
courses which carry credit of three or more semester hours will be counted 
toward the student's undergraduate degree at Rice. 

Tuition for such courses in $100 per semester hour plus a $50 registration 
fee, the total not to exceed $1250. Application for admission should be made to 
the Admissions Office. Financial assistance is not available for this program. 



Auditors 

Any interested person may audit one or more courses at Rice by securing 
permission of the instructor and by registering as an auditor with the regis- 
trar. The university grants no academic credit and keeps no permanent rec- 
ords of courses attended by auditors. 

Currently enrolled students may audit courses without charge. Rice 
alumni may audit as many courses as they wish for a fee of $25 per semester. 
All others will be charged $50 per course per semester for the privilege of audit- 
ing. 



Student Housing 

Prospective students should indicate on the application for admission 
whether or not they desire to reside on the campus. Information about residence 
in the college and room application forms will accompany the notice of admis- 



72 INFORMATION FORUNDERGRADUATES 



sion sent to each new undergraduate. Room reservations cannot be made prior 
to notification of admission. 

At present, Rice University has the capacity to house about 60 percent of 
its undergraduate students in the residential colleges on campus. Although 
the majority of students desiring to live in the colleges can be accommodated, 
demand exceeds the available number of rooms. Every effort is made to pro- 
vide housing in the colleges for all incoming freshmen who wish to live on 
campus, but continuing students cannot be promised space and must draw for 
rooms according to the priority system in each college. No student is required 
to live on campus. Off-campus members are encouraged to eat in their colleges 
and to participate in college activities. 

Correspondence from new students regarding housing in the residential 
colleges should be addressed to the Office of Admissions. Information con- 
cerning off-campus housing is available from the Office of Student Advising 
and Student Activities. 




INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 73 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 



The tuition and fees for undergraduate students are set forth below. 
These charges are subject to change from time to time as the operating 
expenses of the university change. i 

Tuition 

The tuition for undergraduate students is $2500 per year, payable $1250 
prior to the beginning of each semester. 

Part-time students taking less than four courses by special permission of 
the Committee on Examinations and Standing will be billed at the part-time 
rate of $100 per semester hour for the courses in which they are enrolled plus a 
$50 registration fee, the total of tuition and registration fee not to exceed 
$1250 per semester. 

The tuition charge for Class III students is $125 per semester hour plus a 
$50 registration fee, the total not to exceed $1250 per semester. 

Students completing their degree requirements in the summer or fall 
prior to the awarding of the degree or students completing their senior year at 
another university by special permission of the Committee on Examinations 
and Standing will be charged a $50 registration fee and a diploma fee for the 
spring semester. (See Graduation, page 65). 

Any undergraduate who withdraws or takes an approved leave of absence 
and is then readmitted to the university will be charged the tuition in effect 
during the semester in which he or she returns. 

Fees 

All undergraduate students and candidates for a second bachelor's degree 
will be charged the following annual fees, payable in full at the time of the 
student's first tuition payment for the year or any portion of the year. 

Subsidies to students' activities $24.55 

Tickets to athletic events 4.00 

College fee 25.00 

Health Service 66.00 

Total fees $119.55 

Special Charges 

Orientation Week (room and board) $25.00 

Late payment 25.00 

Late change of registration 10.00 

Diploma 22.00 

ROTC 15.00 

Health Insurance, twelve months, single 

student (See page 86) 112.75 

Guaranty Bond 

Every undergraduate student, regardless of age, is required to provide a 
$300 guaranty signed by the student and a parent, guardian, or other respon- 
sible adult, excluding a spouse or another student. A deposit is not required for 
this bond. 



74 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



Refund of Tuition 



A student who withdraws during the first two weeks of the semester will 
not be charged tuition or fees for that semester. A student who withdraws 
during the third week will be charged 30 percent of the semester's tuition. The 
amount of the refund will be reduced by 10 percent at the beginning of each 
successive week. No refund will be made for withdrawals after the ninth week. 
There is no refund of fees or special charges after the second week of classes in 
the semester. The $100 registration deposit paid by incoming freshmen is not 
refunded at any time if the student withdraws. There is no partial refund of 
fees paid for the full year for withdrawals or leaves of absence in the spring 
semester. 

Teacher Certification Program Fees 

All students enrolling in either the apprenticeship plan or the internship 
plan will be charged a $100 registration fee for each semester or summer period. 

Delinquent Accounts 

No student in arrears in any financial obligation to Rice University as of 
the date announced for the completion of registration for any semester will be 
registered. No certificate of attendance, diploma, or transcript of credit will 
be issued at any time for a student whose account is in arrears. 

Students who have not made satisfactory arrangements with the cashier 
for payment of current charges, or anyone moving on campus without execut- 
ing a satisfactory room contract, may be dropped from the rolls of the university. 

Transcripts 

Transcripts are issued on request made to the Office of the Registrar. No 
transcript is issued without consent of the individual whose record is con- 
cerned. Each student is entitled to two free transcripts. There is a charge of $1 
for each additional copy, payable in advance. Those requesting transcripts by 
mail should include payment with the request. 

Living Expenses 

Residence fees, to cover costs of dining halls and operation of residences, 
are established from year to year as requirements dictate. For 1978-1979 the 
yearly room and board charge for residence in a residential college is $1990. 
This charge provides room and three meals per day excluding the evening 
meals on Saturdays and Sundays. Meals are not served during the Thanksgiv- 
ing holidays, mid-year, fall and spring midterm recesses, and the Easter holi- 
days. When securing room assignments for the academic year to follow, each 
student is required to make a room deposit of $50. To assure reservation of 
space, current students must make room deposits by the date established in 
the various colleges, but no later than April 15. New students are required to 
make a similar deposit prior to May 1. These deposits are returnable but will 
be applied against the following semester's charges. The balance of the resi- 
dence fee is payable in installments. The exact amounts and due dates are 
stated in the residential college agreement which each on-campus resident is 
required to sign. 

All items included, the young man or woman entering Rice University in 
August 1978 and living on campus will need to have available about $5550 the 
first year. For a student living at home the cost will be about $4500. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 75 

Financial Aid 



The financial aid program at Rice University seeks to provide assistance 
as needed in meeting the basic costs of attendance to all students who are 
admitted. Through grants, low interest loans, campus work opportunities, or a 
combination of these programs. Rice attempts to give the students sufficient 
aid to meet educational expenses. 

The financial aid program is funded from many sources. Rice University 
receives from alumni and friends contributions which are used to initiate 
and maintain scholarships and loan funds. Other funds available to the students 
are federal programs, both grant and loan, the state grant program, and the 
Rice University tuition grant and loan appropriation from endowment income. 

Awards are based primarily on financial need. It is assumed that (1) 
students will rely upon their own resources as much as possible and will make 
a reasonable effort to increase them through summer work and other sources 
which may be available to them, (2) student expenses will be held to a reason- 
able minimum, and (3) parents will contribute in proportion to their means 
and other obligations. 

A brochure entitled "Rice: Financial Aid Opportunities" explains the 
program of assistance in detail. You may secure a copy from the Office of Ad- 
missions. 

The determination of need is based on information supplied through the 
College Scholarship Service. 



Application 

To apply for financial assistance the candidate must file a Rice University 
financial aid application with the university as well as the Financial Aid Form 
with the College Scholarship Service. When Rice University receives both 
forms the applicant is considered for all appropriate assistance administered 
by the university including grants, scholarships, loans, and work. 

Early Decision candidates may obtain the Financial Aid Form from Rice 
University. This form and the application for financial aid must be filed by 
October 1. Interim Decision candidates must file the Rice University financial 
aid application and the Financial Aid Form by January 15 and Regular 
Decision candidates must file the Financial Aid Form by February 1. 

Notifications of offers of financial aid accompany notices of admission to 
Rice. Financial aid awards are made on an annual basis and are payable as 
indicated on the award sheet. 

Continuing students must file the Rice University financial aid applica- 
tion with the university and the Financial Aid Form with the College Scholar- 
ship Service by August 1. Since awards are based on need which may change 
from year to year, the amount of assistance is reviewed and adjustment made 
each year as related to the current need. 



Financing 

In some cases meeting the costs of higher education in a private university 
is difficult even though the usual financial analysis indicates no need for 
financial aid. It is understood that even though a family's assets may be ade- 
quate to afford the cost of tuitition, fees, and room and board without financial 



76 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

aid, payment of relatively large sums at stated times may require rearrange- 
ment of family planning that results in hardships or sacrifice. Rice University 
offers two payment plans to permit financing of educational costs. Both re- 
quire very low interest charges. 

A short-term, ten-pay plan permits division of the annual university 
charges over ten months. Arrangements are made through the Cashier's 
Office, from which details and applications may be obtained. 

Longer term financing is available through the Rice University loan pro- 
gram to those for whom lump sum payments would require undue hardship. 
Under the terms of this plan a student may borrow up to two thousand dollars 
in one year. Interest is not charged so long as the student is registered as an 
undergraduate in the university. Upon more than one year's leave of absence, 
or withdrawal, or following graduation, arrangements are made for repay- 
ment over an extended period, interest being charged at a very nominal rate. 



Student Loan Funds 

A few endowments have been established for student loans primarily as 
memorial tributes. Others are welcome. These funds are basically part of the 
normal financial aid program. They are used also, however, for emergency 
loans to students who experience unexpected financial problems during a 
term. 

Karl Bailey-William Carroll Memorial Loan Fund 

Frank McFadden Caldwell Loan Fund 

Louise Adele Drenkle Loan Fund 

Mary Alice Elliott Loan Fund 

Houston Bridge League Loan Fund 

Leo M. Levy Memorial Loan Fund 

Lora B. Peck Loan Fund 

Rice University Loan Fund 

Students Memorial Loan Fund 

Owen Wister Literary Society Alumnae Loan Fund 



Student Employment 

Employment is available to students interested in working part time dur- 
ing the academic year. These work opportunities are available both on campus 
and off campus. Students seeking employment should apply directly to the 
Financial Aid Office. 



Vocational Rehabilitation 

The Texas Rehabilitation Commission offers assistance for tuition and 
nonrefundable fees to students who have certain disabling conditions if their 
vocational objectives have been approved by a TRC counselor. Examples of 
such conditions are orthopedic deformities, emotional disorders, diabetes, 
epilepsy, and heart conditions. Other services are also available to assist the 
handicapped student to become employable. Application for such service 
should be made at the Texas Rehabilitation Commission. Students with visual 
handicaps should contact the Texas State Commission for the Blind. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 77 

Undergraduate 
Scholarships and Awards 



Alumni and friends of Rice University have generously endowed many 
awards and scholarships to assist students. Some of these are awarded on the 
basis of need as well as academic performance, but a number of scholarships 
and prizes are given on the basis of academic performance alone. 

Students do not apply for these awards and scholarships. Every student is 
automatically considered for an award or scholarship on the basis of entrance 
qualifications or performance at Rice, together with evidence of financial need 
submitted to the Financial Aid Office as these or other qualifications may be 
appropriate. Further informaton on the donors, the number and purpose of 
individual awards, and the names of their most recent recipients are available 
from the Financial Aid Office or from the office of the Dean of Undergraduate 
Affairs. 

General Awards and Scholarships 

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation Scholarship 

John McKnitt Alexander Chapter of The Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion Scholarship 

Joe L. and Barbara Allbritton Scholarship . ■ ' . 

Florrie Ethel and M.E. Andrews Scholarship 

Samuel S. Asch Scholarship - ■::. .■•. 

Max Autry Memorial Scholarship j^- •, - ■ 

Axson Club, Ellen Axson Wilson Scholarship , 'i 

Axson Club, Katie B. Howard Scholarship '• ' '^ •' ' 

Axson Club, Special Scholarship Honoring Mrs. A. S. Foote . " .: 

Donald R. Baker Scholarships ',-.-, 

Graham Baker Studentship 

James A. and Alice Graham Baker Distinguished Scholarship 

James A. and Alice Graham Baker Honor Scholarships 

Board of Governors Scholarships 

Fletabel Denton Briggs Memorial Scholarships Trinity College, 

Mildred C. Brinn Scholarship 

C. D. Broad Exchange Program Award with 
Cambridge 

Brown and Root Officers Scholarships Honoring George R. Brown 

Clyde and Ethel Butcher Scholarship 

Chapman-Bryan Memorial Scholarship 

Chinese Professional Club Scholarship 

Class of 1921 Scholarship 

Arthur B. Cohn Prize Scholarships 

College Bowl Champions Scholarship 

College Women's Club Scholarship 

Continental Airlines Foundation Scholarship 

Thomas A. and Pauline M. Dickson Scholarship 

Thomas P. and Maude Seeger Dow Scholarships 

Thomas Flaxman Scholarship 

Thomas R. and Julia H. Franklin Scholarships 

Lady Geddes Prize in Writing 

Mary Parker Gieseke Scholarship 



78 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Gordon Jewelry Scholarship 

Harold B. Hamilton Scholarship 

William Clifford Hogg Fund Scholarships 

Hohenthal Scholarships 

Mercer T. Ingram Scholarship 

M. M. Feld and J. P. Hamblen Interfaith Charity Scholarships 

Alfred R. and Eleanor H. Johnson Scholarship 

Gaylord Johnson Scholarship 

Jones College Scholarship 

Grant William Jordan and Cora Jordan Memorial Scholarships 

Louise S. Koehler Scholarships 

Patrons of E.L. Lester and Company Scholarship 

Lottman Scholarship 

Margaret Brokaw McCann Scholarship 

J. L. C. McFaddin Scholarship 

W. P. H. McFaddin Scholarship 

Emma S. McGree Scholarships 

Byron Meredith Scholarship 

Achille and Malline Meyer Memorial Scholarship 

Fannie Bess Emery Montgomery Scholarship 

Motheral-Neilan Scholarship 

Muller Scholarship 

Rice Sponsored National Merit Scholarships and National Achievement 

Scholarships 
Ida R. and Hanna E. Nussbaum Scholarship 
Rebecca Raphael and Lilly G. Nussbaum Scholarship 
Raymond Pearson Scholarship 
Emanuel and Mose Raphael Scholarship 
Robert H. Ray Memorial Scholarships 
Ernest R. Rechel Memorial Scholarships 
Rice Service Award 
Richardson Scholarships 
Daniel Ripley Scholarship 
Edith Ripley Scholarships 
James M. and Sarah Rockwell Scholarships 

Catherine Withers Roper and Benjamin E. Roper Memorial Scholarship 
Willie Rowell and Ruth Andrews Scholarship 
The Roy Scholarships 

Kathleen Elaine Schlotterbeck Memorial Scholarship 
Jackie Schnell Memorial Scholarship 
Anita and Campbell Sewall Scholarship 
Society of Rice University Women Scholarship 
Sara Stratford Scholarship 
Teagle Foundation Scholarships 
Herschel M. Vaughan Student Scholarship 
John B. Warren, Jr., Scholarships 
Lady Washington Texas Centennial Award 
Abe and Rae Weingarten Scholarship 
Harris Weingarten Scholarship 

Robert A. Welch Foundation Undergraduate Scholarships 
Elizabeth Aldridge Wells Scholarship 
Blanche White Honor Scholarships 
Charles K. and Maidie Autry Wilbanks Student Fund 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 79 
Awards and Scholarships in Departmental Disciplines 

Accounting and Management 

Leo M. Acker Memorial Scholarship . 

Atlantic-Richfield Scholarships " - 

Financial Executives Institute Award 

Haskins and Sells Foundation Scholarship in Accounting 

John T. McCants Prize in Accounting 

Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants Accounting Excellence Award 

Architecture 

Alpha Rho Chi Award in Architecture 
American Institute of Architects School Medals 
Edward B. Arrants Award in Architecture 
Caudill Rowlett Scott Scholarship 
James H. Chillman, Jr., Prizes 
John Crowder Memorial Scholarship 
M. N. Davidson Fellowships 
Featherlite Scholarship in Architecture 
Jesse H. Jones Scholarship in Architecture 
Fay H. Spencer Memorial Scholarship 
William Ward Watkin Traveling Fellowship 

Art 

PALS Art Awards 

Christine Croneis Sayres Memorial Art Award 

Athletics 

George R. Brown Football Awards 

Emmett Brunson Award 

Walter W. Fondren, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

Joyce Pound Hardy Award 

Joe F. Lipscomb Freshman Award 

George Martin Award 

T. S. Martino Scholarship 

Dell Morgan Award 

Jess Neely Football Awards .J 

Robert Pilcher Quin Award 

Billy Wohn Award 

Chemistry 

Z. W. Salsburg Memorial Award 
Richard B. Turner Memorial Awards 

Economics 

Gibraltar Savings Association Scholarship 
Blanche Randall Haden Scholarship 

Education 

Millie Tutt Cook Scholarship 



80 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Engineering 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers, South Texas Section, Scholarship 

R. C. Baker Foundation Scholarships 

Mr. and Mrs. Val T. Billups Scholarship 

Brown Awards in Engineering 

Gerard A. Dobelman Memorial Scholarship 

Steven G. Dobelman Memorial Scholarship 

Fluor Ocean Services Scholarship 

Lillian Haynie Scholarship 

Houston Engineering and Scientific Society Scholarship 

Kemper Foundation Engineering Scholarships 

A. C. Lederer, Jr., Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Mason G. Lockwood Engineering Scholarship 

H. A. Lott, Inc., Scholarship 

National Society of Professional Engineers Scholarship 

Rice Engineering Alumni Outstanding Senior Engineering Student Awards 

Spaw-Glass Merit Scholarship in Chemical Engineering, honoring Mr. and 

Mrs. L. D. Spaw, Jr. 
James S. Waters Creativity Award 



French 

Pi Delta Phi Andre Bourgeois Award 
William J. Reckling Memorial Scholarship 
Schlumberger Foundation French Fellowships. 



Geology 

Torkild Rieber Award 
L. P. Teas Scholarship 



German 

Max Freund Prize in German 



History 

Mary Hayes Ewing Publications Prize in Southern History 
Barbara Field Kennedy Prize in American History 



Mathematics 

Spaw-Glass Merit Scholarship honoring Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Glass, Jr. 



Military Science 

American Legion Scholastic Excellence Awards 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Awards 

Society of American Military Engineers Award 

Superior Cadet Decoration Awards 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 81 



Music 

Elva Kalb Dumas Award in Music 
Erwin and Emily Hemen Award in Music 
Sallie Shepherd Perkins Award 
Burt Duke Raiza Piano Scholarship 
Benjamin A. Shepherd Awards 
Dorothy Richard Starling Awards 



Naval Science 

Jesse H. Jones Naval Scholarships 

Leonard S. Mewhinney Scholarship ' 

Navy League Award 

Society of American Military Engineers Award 



Physical Education 

G. L. Hermance Award in Physical Education 



Physics 

Claude W. Heaps Prize in Physics 



PoHtical Science 

Charles Breckenridge Parkhill Scholarship in Political Science 



College Awards 

Donald R. Baker Scholarships 

H. E. Bray Freshman Award 

Jones College Scholarships 

Richardson College Master's Award for Excellence in Scholarship 

Z. W. Salsburg Award 

Jackie Schnell Memorial Scholarship 

Corrinne and Radoslav Tsanoff Sophomore and Junior Prizes 

Olga Keith Wiess Award 

In addition to the above awards, Rice is invited to nominate students for 
several scholarships and fellowships which provide funds for foreign study 
and travel or later graduate work. Final selections for these awards are made 
nationally or regionally. 

Danforth Fellowships 

Fullbright-Hays Scholarships 

Latin American Scholarship Program of American Universities, Inc. 

(LASPAU) Scholarships 
Luce Scholarships 
Marshall Scholarships (British) 
Rhodes Scholarship (British) 



82 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Silver Medal of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufac- 
tures, and Commerce (British) 
Harry S. Truman Scholarships 
Thomas J. Watson Fellowships 

Woodrow Wilson Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship in Women's Studies 
Zonta International Amelia Earhart Aerospace Award 



Honor Societies 



The Phi Beta Kappa Society was founded in 1776 at the College of William 
and Mary for the purpose of recognizing intellectual achievement and the love 
of learning among students in the liberal arts and sciences. The Rice Univer- 
sity chapter was formally installed on March 1, 1929. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon, an honorary chemical society, promotes high schol- 
arship and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied chemis- 
try. The Rice chapter was installed in 1927. 

The Pi Delta Phi Society, organized to interest students of French in 
competing for high standing in scholarship, authorized in May 1930 the forma- 
tion of the Theta chapter at Rice. 

The Society of Sigma Xi, for the promotion of research in science, estab- 
lished the Beta of Texas chapter at Rice on March 23, 1938. 

The Tau Beta Pi Association, organized to interest engineering students 
in competing for high standing in scholarship, created the Gamma of Texas 
chapter at the university on December 18, 1940. 

Delta Phi Alpha was founded to promote an interest in the German 
language and literature. The National Council authorized the Gamma Xi 
Chapter at Rice in April 1949. 

Sigma Delta Pi was founded to promote an interest in the Spanish language 
and literature. The Rice University chapter was installed on May 14, 1953. 

The Alpha Zeta Chapter of Sigma Tau, an engineering society devoted to 
scholarship, practicality, and sociability, was installed at the university on 
May 20, 1953. 

Tau Sigma Delta is a national honor society in architecture and applied 
arts. The Tau Chapter was established at Rice on May 7, 1961. 



Student Life 



Student Responsibility 

Each Rice student is expected to observe standards of conduct consistent 
with respect for the law, the fulfillment of contractual obligations, considera- 
tion for the rights of others, and a high level of personal integrity. Though the 
university does not intend to supervise the personal lives of its students, all 
members of the university community are encouraged to be aware that their 
behavior both on campus and off campus may reflect upon the university. 

The student government, the judicial system, and the honor system de- 
pend on a willing exercise of responsibility and honor on the part of everyone. 

The university reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student 
whose conduct may be judged clearly detrimental to the best interests of either 



STUDENT LIFE 83 

the student or the university. Such action will be taken only after careful 
consideration by the appropriate branches of the student government and/or 
the faculty and administration. 

No individual or group may use the name of the university or one of its 
colleges without prior approval of the university and the college. 

r 

The Honor System 

One of the oldest and proudest traditions at Rice is its honor system ad- 
ministered by a student Honor Council whose members are elected annually 
by the student body. Adopted by a vote of the student body in 1916, the system 
has remained essentially unchanged except for changes in the procedures and 
membership of the Honor Council. 

All written examinations and any specifically designated assignments 
are conducted under the honor code. The student body, through its commit- 
ment to the honor system, accepts responsibility for assuring the validity of all 
examinations and assignments conducted under the system. The Honor 
Council is responsible for investigation of all reported violations and for trial in 
those cases when the facts warrant. The Proctor reviews the results of investi- 
gations and trials and acts upon recommendations for penalties. The Honor 
Council conducts a continuing program to orient new students and faculty to 
the responsibilities and privileges of the system. 

Residential Colleges 

Every undergraduate student, whether living on campus or not, is a 
member of one of eight residential colleges. Lovett, Richardson, and Wiess are 
men's colleges; Brown and Jones are women's colleges. Baker, Hanszen, and 
Will Rice are coeducational. 

Each college is a self-governing group of students whose elected officers 
and representatives are responsible for directing a variety of cultural, social, 
and athletic activities as well as maintaining good order in the college. While 
uniformity among the colleges has never been sought and each college has 
developed its own particular interests and character, all seek to foster fellow- 
ship among their members and a mature sense of honor, responsibility, and 
sound judgment. 

Each college has a faculty master who, with his family, occupies the 
master's house adjacent to the college. The master has an overall responsibility 
for all aspects of student life in the college. He is particularly responsible for 
encouraging broad cultural and intellectual interests among the members 
and for promoting individual self discipline and effective self government 
within the college. Other members of the faculty are invited, on consultation 
between the student members and the master, to become resident and non- 
resident associates of the college. Faculty associates act as advisers to the 
members and participate in the fellowship and activities of the college. Sever- 
al colleges also have community associates from the Houston area, drawn from 
various professions. 

Upon acceptance by the university, each undergraduate student is desig- 
nated a member of one of the colleges. Two students who are entering Rice for 
the first time may ask to be assigned to the same college, but may not designate 
which college. Men and women also may indicate a preference for either a 
men's college, or a women's college, or a coed college, but may not designate 
which college. A new student may request membership in the same college as a 
close relative. No other choice of college is allowed. 



84 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

The buildings of each college include a dining hall and living rooms, 
which are available to both resident and nonresident members, and living 
quarters for approximately 215 students from all classes of the university and 
all academic disciplines. At present, on-campus residential space is available 
for most of the freshmen who request it, but a freshman is not assured of space 
until he or she receives formal notification. Continuing students draw for the 
available space by the priority and lottery system established in each college 
since the demand exceeds the available space. 

The College Food Service provides nineteen meals per week, excluding 
evening meals on Saturday and Sunday. Breakfast and lunch meals are cafe- 
teria service, and dinner is seated, family style. No meals are provided on 
designated holidays and recesses. Various services provided by the College 
Food Service for students living in the colleges include (1) assistance with 
special diets prescribed by a physician, (2) sack lunches for students who must 
miss a meal due to a job conflict, (3) sick trays for students when requested by 
the Student Health Service, (4) alternate menu entree, whenever possible, in 
accordance with students' religious practices. 

College Courses 

As one of their important activities, individual colleges sponsor courses 
and workshops open to all students. College courses are initiated by students in 
the colleges during the semester preceding their being offered. Following 
approval by the master and faculty associates of the college and by the Dean 
of Undergraduate Affairs, they are accepted for academic credit on the same 
basis as departmental courses and listed by the registrar each semester dur- 
ing preliminary registration. 

College workshops carry no academic credit and do not appear on a 
student's permanent record. Generally designed for instruction in practical 
skills, they may meet on a regular schedule throughout the semester or be 
offered as short courses. 

By expanding the course offerings of the departments, college courses 
promote the academic involvement of the colleges and provide opportunity 
for interdisciplinary topics of particular interest to students. 

Student Government 

All undergraduates are members of the Rice Student Association, which 
is governed through the Student Senate, composed of the president, two vice 
presidents, the secretary-treasurer, the eight college presidents, and addi- 
tional representatives of on campus and off campus students. 

Alleged violations of university or college rules are handled in accordance 
with the University Code of Judicial Procedure. In most cases original juris- 
diction is assigned to student courts, appeal from whose verdict may be made 
to the college master, the proctor, or the University Review Board as appro- 
priate. Final appeal is to the president of the university. The Honor Council, 
which is composed entirely of students, administers the honor system and 
conducts hearings and trials for alleged offenses against it. The university 
retains ultimate authority in all matters of discipline and over all actions 
affecting its educational function or the safety and well being of members of 
the university community. 

The Student Association annually presents two coveted awards, one to a 
student and one to a faculty or staff member. The Rice Service Award, a 
memorial to Hugh Scott Cameron, first dean of students at Rice, is a bronze 



STUDENT LIFE 85 

medallion awarded to currently enrolled or former members of the Student 
Association who have rendered distinguished service to the student body. 
Selection is made by a committee of faculty and students appointed by the 
association. The Mentor Recognition Award recognizes extraordinary service 
to the student body by a current member of the faculty or staff. 

Student Activities ' ^^ 

In addition to the many activities of the residential colleges, various 
campus-wide organizations and activities give students a wide range of choices 
for extracurricular interests. The official publications include the Thresher, 
the student newspaper; the Campanile, the university annual; and the Rice 
Literary Review. The Rice Program Council sponsors various programs of 
current interest to the student body. A campus radio station, KTRU, is oper- 
ated by students on a 18-hour, seven day a week schedule broadcasting FM 
stereo. 

A large number of student organizations provide for special interests, 
such as the Black Student Union, the Rice Association of Mexican American 
Students, the Chinese Student Association, Rice Democratic Caucus, and 
Young Republicans. There are sports clubs for sailing, karate, rugby, scuba 
diving, bicycling, etc. A student debate society, a premed society, and a prelaw 
society serve other students' interests. 

Many organizations are associated with special academic and profes- 
sional disciplines, such as foreign language clubs, the Architectural Society, 
the student affiliate of the American Chemical Society, and the student 
branches of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the 
American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Institute of Physics, 
the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of 
Electrical and Electronic Engineers. The Army and Navy ROTC students have 
the Chevron and the Sextant, respectively, to represent their special interests. 

The Rice Players is an extracurricular theater group composed of Rice 
students and faculty. The Players present at least four productions each year. 
Recent productions include: Shaw's Arms and The Man, The Visit by 
Durrenmatt, Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, WJio's Afraid of Virginia Woolff, 
and Stoppard's Jumpers. The Players welcome participation by anyone 
interested in any aspect of theatre production or management. 

Women students may join one of the two literary societies — the Elizabeth 
Baldwin Society or the Owen Wister Society. The Rally Club is a special ser- 
vice organization for men. 

Rice students are affiliated with a number of denominational religious 
organizations. These include the Baptist Student Union, the Canterbury As- 
sociation, the Christian Science Organization, the Hillel Society, the Lutheran 
Student Association, the Newman Club, the United Campus Christian Fellow- 
ship, and the Wesley Foundation. These organizations are represented on the 
Student Interfaith Council, a group chartered by the Student Association. 

The Student Health Service 

All students pay a health service fee by the semester. Rice University 
participates in the student health service operated by the University of Texas 
Health Science Center for its own students across the street from the Rice 
campus. On campus, a student health clinic, housed in the north wing of 
Hanszen College and staffed by a nurse or qualified attendant and a resident 



86 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

physician during specified hours, provides first aid and limited medical care. 
Emergency room services, hospital facilities, and referral to specialists are 
all available through the University of Texas Health Science Center. 

Group health insurance is mandatory for all students except those demon- 
strating comparable coverage. The plan offered through the university covers 
the student for twelve months beginning with the fall semester. The charge, 
payable in one or two installments, is $112.75 for a single student and $280.00 
for a student with one dependent. 

The university Psychiatric Service, which is staffed in cooperation with the 
Department of Psychiatry, Baylor College of Medicine, provides help to 
students with many levels and types of problems. The health service fee in- 
cludes this service, although the Psychiatric Service is independent of the 
Student Health Service. Consultaton and brief psychotherapy are available 
without additional charge. When it is clear that more prolonged counseling or 
treatment is necessary, the individual may be referred to a private physician 
or a clinic at his or her own expense, or as covered by health insurance. An 
appointment may be made directly by a student either by phone or in person at 
the office of Psychiatric Service in Lovett Hall. Provisions have been made for 
emergency situations that occur outside office hours. The confidential re- 
lationship between doctor and patient is carefully maintained as necessary to 
the effectiveness of the services. 

Brochures describing the Health Service, Psychiatric Service, and stu- 
dent health insurance are available in the Health Service Office and in the 
Office of Student Advising and Student Activities. 



The Fondren Library 

The Fondren Library houses more than 900,000 volumes plus more than 
1,000,000 microforms, and receives in excess of 8,000 current serial titles 
annually. These figures represent collections in art, architecture, history, 
literature, philosophy, foreign languages, economics, social sciences, natural 
sciences, and engineering. 

Fondren's open shelf policy enables students to locate materials easily and 
to browse through related volumes. Reference librarians assist students in 
using the library. Copies of a general guide and special guides on such features 
as the card catalog, the reserve book room, and the music room are available at 
the information desk. Fondren Library houses such facilities as individual 
study carrels, group study rooms, record listening booths, microform reading 
carrels, and photoduplicating equipment. 



The Rice Memorial Center 

The Rice Memorial Center, built through the generosity of friends and 
alumni, was dedicated on Homecoming weekend of the fall of 1958. The center 
and chapel comprise a memorial to Rice alumni who have died in the service of 
their country. The chapel is utilized for regular nondenominational religious 
services directed by a committee of students and faculty. 

The center serves as a gathering place for students and provides space for 
the Office of Student Advising and Student Activities, the Association of Rice 
Alumni, the Student Association and various student organizations and publi- 
cations. The Campus Store, Sammy's (snack bar and cafeteria), Willie's Pub, a 
lounge, and ballroom facilities are also located in the RMC. 



STUDENT LIFE 87 

Placement Office 

The Placement Office is a service provided by Rice University to assist 
students and alumni in finding employment. Facilities are available for 
students and alumni to be interviewed for prospective employment by 
representatives from business, industry, and schools, and to be interviewed for 
advanced study by representatives from universities and professional schools. 
Listings and contacts for permanent, part-time, and summer employment 
opportunities are available, as well as information on qualifications for various 
professions and occupations. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Rice is a charter member of the Southwest Athletic Conference and a 
member of the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. Rice 
athletes participate in all sports sponsored by the Southwest Athletic Confer- 
ence (baseball, basketball, football, golf, swimming, tennis, and track) and 
those included in the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women 
(basketball, golf, swimming, tennis, track, and volleyball, with possible addi- 
tions). Football games are played in the 70,000-seat Rice Stadium, tennis in the 
Jake Hess Tennis Stadium, basketball and volleyball on the Autry Court in the 
Rice Gymnasium, and track in the Rice Track Stadium. Other facilities in- 
clude an indoor swimming pool; handball, raquet ball, and squash courts; 
gymnastic rooms; baseball field; soccer field; and other playing fields. 

Intramural Sports 

The Health and Physical Education Department offers a supervised pro- 
gram of intramural sports for men and women students. Every year over two 
hundred teams and over half of the student body participate in some thirty 
tournaments. 

An individual may participate in individual or dual sports; any group of 
interested students may form teams for the vaious tournaments. A student 
must compete in the university tournaments to become eligible to represent 
his or her college in the college team sports tournaments which follow the open 
tournaments. The most common units for team competition come from the 
various class sections of the Basic Health and Physical Education program, 
students in the same major field, students in the same college, and faculty and 
graduate students. 

Student Automobiles 

All student automobiles must be registered with the Traffic Division of 
the Rice University Police Department. Students must park in assigned 
areas and observe university regulations, subject to tow away and/or fines 
assessed by the university. Copies of the University Traffic and Parking Reg- 
ulations, which detail student privileges and responsibilities, may be 
obtained from the Traffic Division of the University Police, located in 
Abercrombie Laboratory. 



Information for 
Graduate Students 



Since the opening of the university in 1912 the importance of graduate 
study and research as a principal means of advancing knowledge has been 
recognized. The first Doctor of Philosophy degree was awarded in 1918 in 
mathematics. Since that time the graduate area has been expanded through 
the basic sciences, the humanities, engineering, the social sciences, architec- 
ture, music, administration, and to interdepartmental areas. The number of 
graduate programs has steadily increased and advanced degrees are now 
offered in twenty-nine fields of study. 

Graduate programs fall in two broad categories. Research programs lead 
to the Doctor of Philosophy, the Master of Arts, or the Master of Science 
degrees and are preparation for careers in research, university teaching, or 
related activity. Professional master's programs prepare students for specific 
areas of employment and lead to such degrees as the Master of Accounting, 
Master of Architecture, Master of Business and Public Management, Master of 
Chemical Engineering, Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Electrical 
Engineering, Master of Environmental Engineering, Master of Environ- 
mental Science, Master of Materials Science, Master in Applied Mathe- 
matical Sciences, Master of Mechanical Engineering, Master of Music, and 
Master of Arts in Education. 

Two joint graduate programs are also available to Rice students: (1) a 
course of study with Baylor College of Medicine is available for those who seek 
both the Ph.D. and M.D. degrees; and (2) students may earn the M.A. in history 
at Rice concurrently with a law degree from the law schools at the University 
of Houston or Texas Southern University. 

Research Degrees 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is awarded for original studies in 
accounting, architecture, behavioral science, biology, biochemistry, chemical 
engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, economics, electrical engineering, 
English, environmental science and engineering, French, geology, German, 
history, materials science, mathematical sciences, mathematics, mechanical 
engineering, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religious 
studies, and space physics and astronomy. Various areas of specialization are 
available within these fields of study. 

The degree of Master of Arts is available in the various humanities and 
scientific fields of study including the social sciences. The Master of Science 
degree may be obtained in the fields of chemical, civil, electrical or mechanical 
and aerospace engineering, environmental science and engineering, and ma- 
terials science. The Master of Architecture and the Master of Architecture in 
Urban Design are also offered. 



90 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Interdisciplinary Research Degree Programs 

Interdisciplinary program in systems theory. Students with backgrounds 
in mathematics, mathematical sciences, engineering, physical sciences, or 
social sciences may earn a Ph.D. in systems theory. These programs are highly 
interdisciplinary in nature and do not necessarily require an undergraduate 
major in the area of primary interest to the department. A student working in 
systems theory enrolls in one of the participating departments, currently the 
departments of Chemical Engineering, Economics, Electrical Engineering, 
and Mathematical Sciences. Programs of instruction utilize common courses 
in systems theory and mathematical sciences, as well as specialized courses in 
the areas of principal research interest. Supporting courses and research 
activities are available in a number of cooperating departments, including 
Mathematics and Behavioral Sciences. Courses and research interests in- 
clude: algorithm theory, artificial intelligence, biological systems, chemical 
systems, economic development, information theory, mathematical program- 
ming, modeling, modern control theory, network theory, operations research 
and economics, optimization, stability theory, and statistical communication 
theory. For applications or additional information, contact the chairman of one 
of the participating departments listed above. 

Interdisciplinary program in solid-state electronics and materials 
science. This program leading to the Master of Science or Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy is open to students with backgrounds in engineering or physical 
science. The program is sufficiently flexible to accommodate students who do 
not necessarily have a corresponding undergraduate major. The program 
consists of a common group of courses, taught jointly by the participating 
departments, followed by more specialized courses and seminars given by the 
individual departments. Interdepartmental seminars are also offered. The 
research leading to the degrees is normally supervised by an interdepart- 
mental research committee. The student is enrolled in one of the participating 
departments, currently Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering, and Physics. Current courses and research interests include the 
areas of anelasticity, electrical conductivity, electron microscopy, Fermi 
surfaces, ferroelectrics. ferromagnetism, high temperature and high pres- 
sure phenomena, lasers, lattice theory, microwave and infrared devices, 
semiconductor devices, solid solutions, thin films, and transport phenomena. 
For applications or additional information contact the chairman of one of the 
participating departments listed above. 

Interdisciplinary program in bioengineering. Students with back- 
grounds in engineering, mathematics, physics, biology, or biochemistry may 
pursue a Ph. D. in bioengineering. The curriculum offered involves not only 
an extensive introduction to physiology, biophysics, and laboratory methods, 
but also the analysis, modeling, and instrumentation of biological systems. 
Additional courses cover the areas of systems science, modern control theory, 
computer science, communication theory, biology, chemical engineering, and 
mathematical sciences. Courses offered by Baylor College of Medicine are 
available to satisfy special needs and interests of the student. The present re- 
search areas include: the cardiovascular system, vision research, neurophys- 
iology, biological control systems, ultrasound applications to biological sys- 
tems, and mechanical receptor physiology. For applications or additional 
information, contact the chairman of the Department of Electrical Engi- 
neering. 



RESEARCH DEGREES 91 

Requirements for Research Degrees 

General Requirements. The Doctor of Philosophy degree is awarded 
after successful completion of a program of advanced study extending to the 
frontier of knowledge and an original investigation reported in an approved 
thesis. Normally, three or more years of study are required after admission to 
graduate study. At least two years of full-time study, or the equivalent of sixty 
semester hours, must be in residence at Rice. As final evidence of preparation 
for this degree, the candidate must pass a public oral examination. 

The Master of Arts, Master of Architecture, or Master of Science degree 
may be obtained after completion of at least thirty semester hours of study 
including the thesis or project report, twenty-four of which must have been in 
residence at Rice. Programs will generally include original work embodied in 
a thesis, and the candidate's preparation will be evidenced by a public examina- 
tion. Although students with exceptional qualifications may complete the 
master's in one year, most students will need three or four semesters of study 
and research. In many departments students are eligible for a master's degree 
without submitting a thesis if they have been admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree prior to March 1 of the year in which the degree is to be awarded. 

More specific information about requirements for advanced degrees in 
each field of study is given under department headings in the section of this 
catalog describing course offerings, which begins on page 103. 

Students may pursue their graduate research projects during the sum- 
mer months by enrolling in appropriate summer study and research pro- 
grams. The tuition fee is waived for full-time continuing students. 



Language Requirements. Foreign language requirements for the 
master's and doctoral degrees are established by the individual departments 
according to the need for foreign languages in the conduct of research and 
scholarship in their respective fields. 



Approval of Candidacy. A student seeking the master's or doctoral de- 
gree must submit a petition through the departmental chairman to the 
Graduate Council for the approval of candidacy. The chairman must certify 
that the applicant has fulfilled the departmental requirements and provide a 
transcript or other evidence that the work within the department is of high 
quality. 

The final oral examination can be given only after the candidacy has been 
approved by the Graduate Council. 

Applications for the approval of candidacy for the Ph.D. degree must be 
filed in the Office of Advanced Studies and Research prior to Novemeber 1, and 
for the master's degree prior to 'March 1, of the academic year in which 
graduation is expected. The approval is vailid for two years if for the master's 
degree and four years if for the Ph.D. degree (some departments set a time 
limitation of less than four years). This schedule assures adequate time for 
preparation, review, and revision of the thesis which documents the actual 
scholarly research project which the student has pursued. The student must 
have been approved for the candidacy for the Ph.D. before the beginning of 
the seventh semester of residency at Rice in order to be eligible for continued 
financial support. Appointments and support of graduate study are not con- 
tinued for more than four years except in legitimate cases approved by the 
Graduate Council. 



92 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Oral Examinations. A committee for the oral examination is named by 
the Graduate Council at the time candidacy is approved. The oral Ph.D. com- 
mittee consists of at least three members of the Rice faculty: the thesis direc- 
tor, one other member from the department, and one member in a related field 
outside the department. For the master's oral committee the third member 
may be from within the department. Additional qualified committee mem- 
bers may be selected, with the approval of the Graduate Council. Candidates 
are responsible for informing the members of their committee of the nature of 
the research and its progress; before March 15 the members of the committee 
should review and approve the thesis in preliminary form in order for the 
candidate to be eligible to receive the degree in the May commencement. 

The oral examination may be scheduled at any time prior to the beginning 
of examination week in either semester. For the Ph.D. degree, the exam- 
ination must be announced in the university calendar the previous week. In 
appropriate circumstances an oral examination for the Ph.D. may be sched- 
uled during the summer and the posting of notice of the time and place on the 
bulletin board of Fondren Library the preceding week will be acceptable as 
the public announcement. For the master's degree public notice of the oral 
examination should be posted on the departmental bulletin board one week in 
advance. 

The length of the examination and the character of the subject matter on 
which the candidate will be examined are left to the judgment of the commit- 
tee. Should the candidate fail, the chairman may schedule a second examina- 
tion. In the event of a second failure, the student will be required to withdraw 
from the university. Following the successful passing of the oral examination 
in defense of the thesis, the three copies of the dissertation must be submitted to 
the dean of Advanced Studies and Research no later than one year from the 
date of the examination. 

Thesis Regulations and Procedure. The thesis, which is the principal 
record of work for an advanced degree, will be permanently preserved in the 
library. Directions are provided upon approval of candidacy for the standard 
form which must be followed in detail. Copies of these instructions may be 
obtained from the Office of Advanced Studies and Research. Students submit- 
ting a dissertation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must fill out a Survey of 
Earned Doctorates form and a University Microfilm contract. Fees for the 
microfilming and binding of the dissertation are to be paid to the cashier prior 
to submission of the three copies to the dean. The deadline for acceptance of 
the thesis by the dean is 12:00 noon of the next to last Friday preceding 
commencement. 

Professional Degrees 

Rice University offers several advanced degree programs which prepare 
students for positions in fields such as accounting, business and public man- 
agement, architecture, mathematical sciences, engineering, secondary educa- 
tion, and music. 

Requirements for professional master's degrees usually include the suc- 
cessful completion of ten or more courses at the graduate level. Candidates for 
the nonthesis professional master's degree are not required to take an oral 
examination, although some departments may give a final oral, but all stu- 
dents for this degree must petition for approval of candidacy prior to March 1 
of the year in which they anticipate graduation. The specific requirements for 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 93 

each professional master's degree and the regulation of these programs are 
normally the responsibility of the departments involved and the Graduate 
Council. Some information on individual departmental requirements is given 
below; further details are presented in this catalog with the listing for the de- 
partment concerned in the Courses of Instruction section. 

I V ■ 

Accounting and Management 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration offers two profes- 
sional degrees, the Master of Accounting and Master of Business and Public 
Management, as well as the Doctor of Philosophy in Accounting. Applicants to 
these programs must submit scores on the Graduate Management Aptitude 
Test (GMAT), all college transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. 
Application materials may be obtained from the Office of the Dean, Jesse H. 
Jones Graduate School of Administration. 

Admission to the Jones School is open to undergraduates from Rice or 
other universities, regardless of undergraduate major, but is highly selective 
and limited to those who have performed with distinction in their previous 
academic work and on the GMAT. Exceptional students from Rice and other 
cooperating universities may be admitted to the Jones School after completion 
of their junior year. 

For admission to either master's degree program, undergraduates should 
take the following Rice courses or their equivalents: Accounting 305 (Intro- 
duction to Accounting) and Economics 211 (Principles of Economics). For 
the Master of Accounting program, the following Rice course or its equivalent 
should also be taken: Mathematical Sciences 222 (Business Data Processing). 
Students may be admitted without such coursework but must complete these 
requirements without graduate credit prior to entering graduate courses. 

Completion of the Master of Accounting program requires one to two 
academic years, depending upon the student's undergraduate preparation, 
while the Master of Business and Public Management program requires two 
academic years. To qualify for either degree, the student must maintain a 2 
("B") average and may be required to pass an oral examination during the last 
semester in residence. 

For further information regarding these programs, consult the section for 
the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration (Accounting and Ad- 
ministrative Science) in the Courses of Instruction listing. 

Architecture 

An applicant for admission to the professional master's degree program 
in architecture should write to the director of the Rice University School of 
Architecture for specific information about the program for which the appli- 
cant would be qualified by education and experience. Completed application 
materials include the Rice University Application for Graduate Study form, 
transcript(s). Graduate Record Examination scores, a portfolio of the appli- 
cant's work, and a minimum of three letters of recommendation. Candidates 
will be evaluated on the basis of their academic records and the quality of the 
design portfolio. 

Education 

The Master of Arts in Teaching is a professional degree program for 
students wishing to qualify for secondary school teaching following a liberal 



94 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

undergraduate education. The degree involves one academic year and two 
summers of satisfactory graduate work consisting of (1) coursework in the field 
of teaching and in the candidate's two subject-matter fields and (2) teaching 
internship. 

Admission to. the graduate education program at Rice is open to Rice 
graduates and to appropriately prepared students from other universities who 
have received a bachelor's degree and who present evidence of scholarly abil- 
ity and motivation. Applicants will be expected to take the Aptitude Test and 
appropriate Advanced Tests of the Graduate Record Examination Program. 
Applications will be reviewed and admission determined by the Rice Teacher 
Education Council. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching will be found in the 
Education Department section of the Courses of Instruction listing. 

Engineering 

Applications for admission to the professional master's degree program in 
a specified branch of engineering are considered by the Graduate Council 
upon recommendation of the various departments and the Engineering 
Committee on Professional Masters Degrees. Candidates are required to com- 
plete ten advanced courses (numbered 300 or higher) in addition to satisfying 
the requirements of an approved bachelor's degree program. The ten ad- 
vanced courses include at least four at the 500 or 600 level indicating profes- 
sional study in depth of a particular area. Four of the remaining six courses 
are used for additional professional concentration or to add some breadth in 
another technical area as determined by the department. Courses may not be 
taken on a pass-fail basis in satisfaction of these course requirements. The 
student's major department must approve the overall program. Programs 
which depart from these guidelines must have specific approval of the En- 
gineering Committee on Professional Masters Degrees and the Graduate 
Council. 

Students are recommended for degrees by their departments if they make 
at least four grades of 1 or 2 and no more than one grade of 4. 

Chemical Engineering. Flexibility in course planning permits special- 
ization in such areas as economics, nuclear engineering, reservoir engineer- 
ing, process control, optimization and systems analysis, applied mathematics, 
materials science, kinetics, and catalysis. 

Civil Engineering. The detailed program of each student is formulated 
in consultation with a departmental adviser. The student's area of concentra- 
tion (at least five courses) will be structures and mechanics. Some specializa- 
tion in solid mechanics, geotechnicical engineering, or applied mathematics is 
possible within the structures and mechanics concentration. 

Electrical Engineering. Technical electives permit some specialization 
in the general areas of bioengineering, systems and information theory, solid- 
state and physical electronics, and computer science and engineering. 

Environmental Engineering. Proper course planning will permit 
specialization in water resources, air resources, pollution control, process 
design and optimization, mathematical modeling, applied mathematics, 
urban systems, and environmental planning. 

Environmental Science. Flexibility in choice of electives permits con- 
centration in such areas as the biology, physics, chemistry, and geology of en- 
vironmental planning and management, pollution detection and control, ap- 
plied mathematics, and urban systems analysis. 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 95 

Materials Science. After successful completion of a bachelor's degree in 
materials science or a related field a student may proceed to the professional 
Master of Materials Science by choosing eight courses in materials science or 
related fields plus two free electives. 

Mechanical Engineering. For properly qualified students, flexibility in 
course requirements permits specialization in thermal sciences and energy 
conversion, gas dynamics, hydrodynamics and ocean engineering, stress 
analysis and mechanical behavior of materials, aerospace engineering, air 
pollution, and materials engineering. 

Mathematical Sciences 

An applicant for admission to graduate study for the professional master's 
degree in mathematical sciences should obtain specific information about the 
program and the application form from the chairman of the Mathematical 
Sciences Department. The completed form with transcript(s) and recom- 
mendations, in the case of students who are not undergraduate students at 
Rice, should be returned to the department. Candidates are evaluated on their 
previous academic records and their potential for success in and benefit from 
the professional program. 

Music 

The Shepherd School will accept applications for admissions to its Master 
of Music program from recipients of a bachelor's degree from other accredited 
institutions. Candidates for the Master of Music degree may be required to 
take additional work at the undergraduate level before continuing their 
graduate study, as determined by the faculty of The Shepherd School. 

For a description of The Shepherd School of Music five-year professional 
degree, the Master of Music with the Bachelor of Music awarded simultane- 
ously, see Music in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Cooperative Graduate Programs 



Joint Graduate Programs with Baylor College of Medicine 

These programs are designed to provide educational experiences of high 
quality leading to research careers in medicine, as, for example, in biomedical 
engineering research. They are directed toward a small number of highly 
qualified students, with sufficient undergraduate background in mathematics 
and the physical sciences to undertake graduate w^ork and thesis research. In 
addition, students must have completed the course work in biological and 
social sciences required for entrance into medical school. The participants in 
these programs may secure admission to the M.D. curriculum at Baylor Col- 
lege of Medicine as well as to graduate study at Rice, and must fulfill the 
respective coursework and degree candidacy requirements at both institutions. 
Successful completion of a program results in the M.D. from Baylor and the 
M.S. or Ph.D. from Rice, usually within a period shorter by at least one year 
than the time required to obtain these degrees separately. The joint programs 
offer a unique combination of professional medical training with rigorous 
study in a science or engineering discipline and emphasize an interdisciplinary 
approach to current problems in biomedicine. These programs are currently 



96 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

active in the departments of Electrical Engineering (Bioengineering), Chemi- 
cal Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering and are under consideration in 
other disciplines. Additional information may be obtained from the respective 
departments. 

Joint Graduate Program in History and Law 

This selective program combines graduate work in legal and constitutional 
history at Rice University with professional work in law at the Bates College of 
Law, University of Houston, or at the Law School of Texas Southern Univer- 
sity. Students in their first or second year of law school may apply for participa- 
tion through their law school to Rice. Participants will spend one year at Rice in 
the Master of Arts program, concentrating on legal and constitutional history. 
After having completed this year of residence and all requirements for the 
M.A. except the thesis, the student will return to law school to finish his or her 
legal studies. During the last year of law school, the student will complete a 
suitable M.A. -level research thesis on a topic in legal and/or constitutional 
history selected with the approval of the law school instructor and the student's 
Rice history adviser. The student who completes this program will receive a law 
degree from his or her law school as well as an M.A. in history from Rice. 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Graduate study is open to well qualified students who possess adequate 
background in the field of study they wish to pursue. Normally, but not always, 
the equivalent of an undergraduate major in the field is required, but the final 
judgment of preparation rests with the department concerned; the emphasis is 
on the quality of the applicant's preparation rather than on the academic 
program pursued or credits earned in achieving it. Applicants for graduate 
study should arrange to take the Graduate Record Examination since these 
tests offer an additional opportunity for applicants to demonstrate the quality 
and depth of their knowledge in the field of study. Completed applications are 
forwarded by the various departments to the chairman of the Graduate Coun- 
cil for review and action. 

Each graduate student will be advised by the departmental chairman or 
an officially designated faculty member in planning the initial semester of 
graduate study. Sometime during the first year of graduate work each student 
should identify with an adviser who will help plan both the course program 
and the thesis or special project. 

Research Degrees 

An applicant for admission to graduate study for a research degree should 
address all communications to the chairman of the appropriate department. 
The chairman will provide the relevant information about the graduate pro- 
gram and the appropriate application form. The completed form, with the 
transcript and recommendations, should be returned to the chairman of the 
department. After a departmental committee has made a preliminary evalua- 
tion, the application form and other documents will be transmitted by the 
chairman to the Graduate Council for final action. Candidates are evaluated 
on their previous academic records, test scores available, and their qualifica- 
tions to pursue advanced study. Their capacity for research is primarily 
determined through references from scholars under whom they have studied. 



ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY 97 

In addition to any specific requirements of tlie department, the applicant 
will be expected to have at least a 2 or "B" average in undergraduate work. 
Preference will be given to applicants who earn high scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination. Arrangements to take this examination may be made 
directly with the Educational Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540 or Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701. Applicants in the Houston 
area may also apply in person to the Office of Advanced Studies and Research 
at Rice for necessary forms. 

Normally, all graduate students will be assigned a limited amount of 
teaching as part of their training for advanced degrees. 

Advanced study and research programs leading to the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree are available in twenty-five areas of study and normally are 
operated by the departments concerned. Most details of the various depart- 
mental requirements for the Ph.D. are found in this catalog under the listings 
of the individual departments; complete information may be obtained by con- 
tacting the appropriate departmental chairman. 

Class III Students 

Students with an undergraduate or graduate degree from an accredited 
college or university may enroll as Class III students and take courses for 
credit without being admitted to a specific degree program. Courses taken 
under this arrangement cannot later be used to fulfill the requirements for an 
advanced degree at Rice until the student has applied to the appropriate 
department, been recommended for admission, and been officially admitted 
by the Graduate Council. Such part-time study may be used to fulfill the 
residence requirements for either master's or Ph.D. degrees upon official 
admission. Further information on enrollment of Class III students is found 
on page 71. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 



Tuition for full-time students enrolled in the graduate division is $2,500 
per year ($1,250 per semester) for all students through six semesters. In 
addition, each full-time graduate student pays a health service fee of $66 per 
year ($33 per semester) and a Graduate Student Association fee of $3. After six 
semesters students continuing any phase of their studies including work on 
their dissertation, on or off campus, must be registered and are subject to a 
tuition fee of $200 per year ($100 per semester). Continuous involvement and 
enrollment are expected. Failure to register for any period without a leave of 
absence granted by the Graduate Council will require reapplication by the 
student, approval of the Graduate Council for readmission, and the payment 
of the tuition for up to two missed semesters plus a special registration fee of 
$100. A leave of absence is granted only before registration each semester and 
must have the approval of the department chairman and the Graduate Coun- 
cil. A reactivation fee of $25 will be required upon return. 

The graduate programs at Rice are designed for full-time study, but in 
special circumstances a limited number of students may be admitted on a 
part-time basis. The part-time tuition is $125 per semester hour plus $50 
registration fee each semester, the total not to exceed $1250 per semester. The 
tuition for summer study and research, which is applicable to part-time stu- 
dents, is $200; there is no summer registration fee. 



98 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduate students who have fulfilled all requirements for the degree 
sought, including the thesis and/or final public oral examination, not already 
registered under one of the categories above, must be registered as "Require- 
ments complete — registering for degree only" for the spring semester in 
which the degree is awarded. This requires the payment of a registration fee of 
$50, plus the diploma fee. This registration fee is not refundable and may not 
be carried forward to a later year. The diploma fee is not refundable but may 
be carried forward for one year if a diploma is not prepared. The deadline for 
payment of the fees or cancellation of the diploma is eight weeks prior to the 
date scheduled for the graduation ceremonies. 

All students are required to carry health insurance. Such insurance is 
available through the director of student activities. This expense is not in- 
cluded in the tuition or fees. 

For an annual fee of $4, a graduate student may purchase admittance to 
all regularly scheduled athletic events. If married, a student may purchase a 
season ticket for a spouse at a reduced rate of one-half the regular price, 
provided the season ticket is purchased at the beginning of the fall term. 

The tuition and fees for graduate students as set forth above are subject to 
change from time to time as the operating expenses of the university change. 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 

Memorial Fellowships, Honors, and Prizes. Provision is made for a 
variety of fellowships available to graduates of this and other universities. 
There are several memorial fellowships that have been founded and endowed 
by gift or bequest on the part of friends of Rice University. These provide 
stipends designed to enable the holders to devote their time to atudy and 
research in their chosen fields. There are also several industrial fellowships 
maintained by companies interested in the development of technical fields and 
the training of competent scientists and engineers. 

Persons desiring to be considered for appointment as fellows should 
consult with the department in which they desire to do research. 

Leo M. Acker Memorial Scholarship 

Amoco Foundation Fellowship in Environmental Science and Engineering 

Ora N. Arnold Fellowship for better understanding between the people and 

governments of Mexico, the South American states, the West Indies, and 

the Philippine Islands 
Nettie S. Autrey Memorial Fellowships in Science 
Eleanor and Mills Bennett Fellowships in Hydrology 
Ralph Budd Award for Research in Engineering 
Samuel Fain Carter Fellowship in Economics 
Cities Service Research Fellowship in Geology 
Continental Oil Company Fellowship in Geology 
William Dunlap Darden Medal in Architecture 
Doherty Fellowship in Marine Geology 
Environmental Protection Agency Fellowships in Environmental 

Science and Engineering 
Exxon Fellowship in Geology 
Financial Executives Institute Award 
Ford Foundation Fellowships 



FELLOWSHIPS. SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 99 

John W. Gardner Award in Humanities and Social Sciences 

Gulf Oil Company Fellowship in Geology . ; 

Haskins & Sells Foundation Scholarship in Accounting 

Fannie and John Hertz Foundation Fellowships in Applied Physical 

Sciences 
Houston Geological Society Outstanding Student Award 
Captain Charles Septimus Longcope Awards in History 
Edgar Odell Lovett Fellowships in Mathematics 
John T. McCants Scholarship in Accounting 
Mrs. L. F. McCollum Fellowship 
National Institutes of Health Fellowships 
National Institutes of Health Traineeships in Biology 
National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships 
Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society 
Phillips Petroleum Company Fellowship in Chemistry , ■ 

Torkild Rieber Award in Geology • ' 

Schlumberger Foundation Fellowships in Mathematics . . 

Shell Fellowship in Physics - -n;" 

Sigma Xi Research Awards •■ . ,' 

John Stauffer Scholarship in Chemistry •> ^^ . 

Tenneco Oil Company Fellowship in Geology 
Texaco Fellowship in Physics 
Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants' Graduate Accounting 

Fellowship 
Radoslav A. Tsanoff Fellowship in Philosophy 

Richard B. Turner Memorial Awards in Chemistry . 

Union Oil of California Fellowship in Geology ■■■ ; •(•■w,,; 

Wiess Fellowship in Geology ' i ' i;.t^ 

Robert A. Welch Foundation Predoctoral Fellowships u.: 

H. A. Wilson Award in Physics 

Rice Graduate Fellowships. Graduate students with high academic rec- 
ords and outstanding qualifications may receive assistance through awards of 
Rice University Fellowships. These appointments in most cases provide a 
stipend plus tuition for the nine-month academic period. Some research assis- 
tant positions or special fellowships may be available to provide support during 
the summer months. Appointees must be engaged in full-time graduate study. 

In some departments, Rice Teaching Assistantships may be available to 
qualified advanced (third- or fourth-year) students. If exceptional teaching 
ability has been demonstrated, a student may be appointed to a Teaching 
Associateship. 

Graduate Tuition Scholarships. Students whose previous records show 
marked promise but for whom no graduate fellowships are available may, 
especially in their first year of graduate study, be awarded full or partial 
graduate tuition scholarships without stipend. Graduate scholars must carry a 
full schedule of graduate work. 

Tuition grants based on need for financial assistance are available to 
students in the professional master's degree program in engineering. Nor- 
mally Rice engineering students who have received financial aid from the 
university during their undergraduate years may anticipate continuation of 
assistance as needed for the year of professional study. Others must file the 
Financial Aid Form, which is the usual application for financial assistance 
through the College Scholarship Service. Information is available from the 
Financial Aid Office. 



100 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Scholarships which provide both tuition and stipends are also available for 
a limited number of graduate students who are participants in the Army or 
Navy ROTC programs. For information on these scholarships, contact the 
departments of Military or Naval Science. 

Financial Aid 

Financial aid is available to graduate students through the National 
Direct Student Loan, Texas Tuition Equalization Grant, and the Federally 
Insured Student Loan programs. This aid is based on financial need. Applica- 
tion may be made through the Rice University Financial Aid Office. 

Assistance through the National Direct Student Loan program may not 
exceed $2,500 per academic year for four years. The interest rate is a simple 3 
percent on the outstanding balance and interest does not begin to accrue until 
nine months after a student ceases to be enrolled. 

The Texas Tuition Equalization Grant Program provides a maximum of 
$600 per year to eligible Texas residents. No repayment of the grant is 
required. 

Under the Federally Insured Loan program borrowers must make their 
own arrangements directly with a lending agency such as a bank, savings and 
loan agency, credit union, or, in some instances, their home state. The loan will 
be guaranteed by the federal government if the adjusted family income is 
$25,000 or less. The maximum loan for which a student may apply is $2,500 
per academic year and the interest rate is 7 percent. Repayment does not begin 
until nine or twelve months after the student ceases to be a student; however, 
interest commences to accrue immediately. If a student is eligible for federal 
interest benefits, the federal government will pay the interest while the 
student is in school. 

Applicants for these loan programs must be American citizens, or perma- 
nent residents, be enrolled at least half time, and prove financial need by filing 
the Financial Aid Form. This statement is submitted to the College Scholar- 
ship Service for processing and evaluation and a small fee is required. 

A Gulf Oil Corporation Foundation loan fund is also available to students 
who are working toward a degree to assist them in meeting educational ex- 
penses. The Financial Aid Form is required. The funds of this loan program are 
limited. Interested persons may contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Graduate students wishing to apply for a loan under any of these loan 
programs should commence application procedures the summer prior to the 
academic year for which they are seeking assistance. Detailed information 
and application forms are available in the Financial Aid Office. 

An Emergency Loan Fund, originally provided through gifts from the 
Graduate Wives Club of 1972-1973, the Graduate Student Association, and 
various faculty members, is available to help graduate students at Rice with 
short-term needs. Loans from this fund are limited to $100 and must be repaid 
within three months. A charge of $1 is made for loans up to $50 and $2 for 
loans over $50, in lieu of interest and to help build up the fund. 

Graduate Student Life 

Graduate Student Responsibility 

Rice University encourages student self discipline within the framework 
of its general objectives. Each member of the community is expected to govern 
his or her conduct by standards of good taste and ethical judgment and to 



GRADUATE STUDENT LIFE 101 

exercise personal responsibility. 

The university reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any 
students whose failure to accept responsibilities as evidenced by conduct or 
their scholastic achievements is considered detrimental to their own or the 
university's best interests. 



The Honor System 

Graduate students are expected to observe the provisions of the honor 
code. The provisions of the honor system are summarized on page 83. 



Fondren Library 

Fondren Library provides extensive resources for advanced study and 
research among its collections. Several notable research collections are: Civil 
War imprints, broadsides, and manuscripts; Austrian history and literature; 
the Axson Collection of Restoration and eighteenth-century plays; the Nadler 
German language and literature collection; microform holdings of early 
American publications. 

Fondren's collections can be supplemented through interlibrary loans. 
Through membership in the Center for Research Libraries, Fondren has 
access to holdings of more than 3,000,000 volumes, 15,000 journal subscrip- 
tions, and numerous special collections. Fondren also provides carrels for the 
use of graduate students and faculty and a research center housing rare books, 
manuscripts, and other special materials. 



Graduate Student Government and Organizations 

All full-time graduate students are members of the Graduate Student 
Association. It is the sole organ representing the graduate students as a body. 
Part-time graduate students may become members of the association upon 
payment of the necessary fee. The governing body of this organization is the 
Graduate Student Association Council, consisting of a chairman, a secretary, a 
treasurer, and a representative from each department offering graduate study. 
Graduate students also participate in university affairs through their repre- 
sentatives on many of the standing committees appointed by the president, 
such as the Graduate Council, and on various departmental committees as well. 

Wives of graduate students are invited to be members of the Graduate 
Wives Club, which helps provide social opportunities for Rice students and 
their families. 



Housing 

At present the university has no campus housing for graduate students. 
Graduate students may apply for membership in the residential colleges, but 
at present the demand for on-campus space in the colleges by undergraduates 
exceeds the available rooms. Within walking distance of the campus there are 
rooms and apartments for rent. For the convenience of new students, the 
Student Association keeps a record of rooms and apartments about which it 
has been notified, and the daily newspapers list still others. Incoming grad- 
uate students are advised to arrive in Houston several days early in order to 
find lodging. 



102 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

The Student Health Service 

A health service is maintained on campus to provide limited medical care 
including emergency first aid. Limited psychiatric consultation is also avail- 
able. For more information about the services provided refer to page 85. 



Student Automobiles 

All automobiles on campus must be registered with the Rice University 
Police Department. For more information refer to page 87. 




Courses of 
Instruction 



Academic departments are listed in tliis section alpliabetically with com- 
plete lists and descriptions of courses offered. Most departments also give 
specific requirements for students both at the undergraduate and graduate 
levels. These statements are supplemental to the university degree require- 
ments described on pages 50 and 51. 

Beginning in 1978-1979, major requirements for graduation will be desig- 
nated in semester hours instead of semester courses as previously given. 
Students enrolled at Rice in a degree program prior to or at the beginning of 
the fall semester 1978 have the option of completing university and major 
requirements for their degree according to either semester courses or 
semester hours. Students entering after fall 1978 will fulfill the semester hour 
requirements. On the following pages departmental requirements are given 
in semester hours (to include all courses, laboratories, and tutorial sections). 
The corresponding requirement in courses (which refers only to courses of 
three or more semester hours and does not include associated laboratories or 
tutorial sections of less than three semester hours that may also be required) 
is shown in parenthesis. 

Courses numbered below 300 are lower-level or introductory courses. 
Those numbered 300 to 499 are designated as advanced courses. Advanced 
courses are open to freshman and sophomore students with proper prerequi- 
sites and to graduate students on approval of the individual student's adviser. 
Courses designed for graduate students are numbered 500 and above. The 
methods of presentation and quality of work expected make them generally 
unsuited to undergraduate participation. Undergraduates are permitted to 
enroll in graduate-level courses only after consultation with their advisers and 
with the instructor of the course. 

The letters "a" and "b" following the course number indicate whether the 
course is to be taught in the first or second semester in 1978-1979; "c" indicates 
summer offering. Thus History 201a is taught in the fall semester and History 
202b in the spring semester for the current year. The notation "a,b" indicates 
a course that is to be offered both semesters, while "a/b" indicates a one- 
semester course which will be offered either in the first or second semester 
depending upon the demand. 

Figures in parentheses following the title of each course signify the 
number of class hours per week, the number of laboratory hours per week, and 
the credit in semester hours for the completed course, in that order. Courses 
that will not be offered during the 1978-1979 year are marked with a t- 

Course descriptions in this section illustrate topics within the subject 
matters of the courses. Topics actually covered in the courses may vary from 



103 



104 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

the examples given. Courses are subject to cancellation or modification, but 
cancellation of a course after final enrollment will occur only in extreme 
circumstances. 

Students may obtain more detailed information about courses from the 
Registrar's Schedule of Courses published each year or by consulting the 
instructor of the course. 

Persons using this catalog to evaluate Rice University transcripts should 
refer to course titles and descriptions, rather than course numbers, to deter- 
mine content, because course numbers are occasionally changed. 



Accounting and 
Administrative Science 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School 
of Administration 

Professor Sterling, Dean; Professors P.W. Bell, Brody, J. Cooper, 

Doran, Edwards, Hale, Howell, Oliver, Thomas, Thrall, Tuggle, 

von der Mehden, and Zeff 

Adjunct Professors Bush and Valentine 

Associate Professors R. W. Clarke, L.T. Johnson, and G.W. Smith 

Assistant Professors Driskill, Dyer, Greanias, and Windsor 

Lecturers Lucas, McClelland, and Viebig 

Degrees Offered: B.A. with major in Managerial Studies (interdisciplinary 
program): Master of Accounting; Master of Business and Public Manage- 
ment; Ph.D. in Accounting. 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration was established in 
1974 through a gift from Houston Endowment, Inc. Interdisciplinary in 
nature, the school utilizes faculty of other university departments to augment 
its own still expanding faculty. The school is dedicated to providing unique 
educational opportunities for professional training in the fields of accounting 
and management for highly select graduate students. The curricula leading 
to the degrees of Master of Accounting and Master of Business and Public 
Management are designed to be distinctive in terms of scope, realism, and 
utility. The school also offers a Ph.D. in Accounting, in which students under- 
take highly individualized research studies under the direction of distin- 
guished scholars. 

Undergraduate Program. No undergraduate major is offered in the 
Jones School; however, such undergraduate courses as accounting may be 
used to fulfill major requirements in the interdisciplinary program in 
managerial studies. This degree program is described on page 55. 

Students admitted to the Honors Program in managerial studies may 
elect certain graduate courses in accounting and administration as part of 
their major requirements. In addition, the undergraduate major in man- 
agerial studies may be used to satisfy prerequisites for admission to both the 
Master of Business and Public Management and Master of Accounting 
programs. 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 105 

Graduate Programs. The Jones Graduate School of Administration 
offers the Master of Accounting and Master of Business and Public Manage- 
ment degrees and the Ph.D. in Accounting. Applicants to these programs 
must submit scores on the Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT), all 
college transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. Application forms 
are available from and should be submitted to the Office of the Dean, Jesse H. 
Jones Graduate School of Administration. Graduates of any university and 
from a broad range of undergraduate majors will be considered. 

Master of Accounting. The Master of Accounting program prepares 
students for professional positions in public accounting as well as for a variety 
of senior financial positions in business and government. Students enrolled in 
the program represent a wide variety of undergraduate majors, including 
economics, managerial studies, mathematics, mathematical sciences, political 
science, history, languages, fine arts, natural sciences, engineering, and 
business administration. 

The Master of Accounting program consists of sixty semester hours plus 
the Dean's Seminar. Up to thirty semester hours of advanced standing may 
be granted to students with appropriate previous preparation. Under- 
graduate preparation for the Master of Accounting program must include, as 
a minimum, the following Rice courses or their equivalents: Accounting 305 
(Introduction to Accounting), Economics 211 (Principles of Economics), and 
Mathematical Sciences 222 (Business Data Processing). These courses are 
generally offered at Rice during the summer session. An accelerated "3-2" 
degree plan is available to exceptional students from Rice and cooperating 
universities in which students may take graduate courses in their senior year, 
thereby completing the master's degree by the end of five years of college 
study. 

The following courses are required for the Master of Accounting program: 
Accounting 511, 512, 513, 521, 522, 527, 551, 552; Administration 531, 532, 
541, 542, 543. In addition, students must complete a minimum of twenty-one 
semester hours of elective course work, of which twelve semester hours must 
be graduate courses in accounting. The remainder of the course work may be 
graduate courses in administration or other appropriate upper-division or 
graduate courses in the university. Students must maintain at least a 2 ("B") 
average and may be required to pass an oral examination during their last 
semester in residence. 

Master of Business and Public Management (M.B.P.M.). The 

M.B.P.M. prepares students for high-level management positions in business, 
government, and nonprofit organizations. 

Completion of the M.B.P.M. program requires a minimum of two aca- 
demic years in residence. Students must successfully complete sixty semester 
hours in administration and related subjects, plus the Dean's Seminar. 
Exceptional students from Rice and other cooperating universities may be 
admitted to the Jones Graduate School of Administration after completion of 
their junior year. Students who are accepted will be able, during their senior 
year, to take courses leading to a M.B.P.M. degree and to count their senior 
year toward the two-year residence requirement. 

Undergraduate preparation for the M.B.P.M. program should include 
the following Rice courses or their equivalents: Accounting 305 (Introduction 
to Accounting) and Economics 211 (Principles of Economics). 

The determination of the course program for the M.B.P.M. degree 
depends upon the student's previous preparation and present area of interest. 



106 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

About three-fourths of the course work is part of a required core curriculum, 
some of which may be waived depending on previous preparation. Each 
student is required to select an area of concentration for elective courses. Upon 
entering the program, each student, with the assistance of an adviser, will 
select courses to meet the student's goals and objectives. Most courses will be 
in administration and accounting, but they may also include graduate or 
upper-division offerings in other departments. Students must maintain at 
least a 2 ("B") average and may be required to pass an oral examination 
during the last semester in residence. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Accounting. The Ph.D. program in accounting 
prepares candidates for teaching and research careers in accounting. The 
program, which emphasizes research in accounting theory, usually requires 
two years beyond the master's degree. Applicants must have a master's degree 
in accounting or an equivalent degree. 

After completing one year of courses and demonstrating proficiency in a 
related area of concentration, the student is required to pass a general qualify- 
ing examination consisting of oral and written parts. Successful completion of 
this examination qualifies the student to prepare a dissertation that represents 
an original contribution to the field of accounting. 



Accounting 

Accounting Courses 

305a,b. Introduction to Accounting (3-0-3). 

A survey of basic accounting theory and practice with emphasis on the primary problems 
of asset valuation and income determination. Staff 

406a,b. Management Accounting (3-0-3). 

Cost behavior and estimation, profit planning, capital investment decisions, and account- 
ing for manufacturing operation. Designed for nonmajors and open only to seniors. Jones 
School students take Accounting 521, 522. Prerequisite: Accounting 305, Economics 211, and a 
statistics course. Staff 

495a, 496b. Senior Independent Study (0-0-3 each semester). 

Independent study on an approved project under faculty supervision. Enrollment by 
special permission. Staff 

500a,b. Master's Thesis Research. Staff 

511a. Asset Accounting (3-0-3). 

Major topics are the valuation of assets and the measurement of income in accordance with 
generally accepted accounting principles. Prerequisite: Accounting 305. Mr. JoIuisun 

512b. Equity Accounting (3-0-3). 

Major topics are the valuation of equities and the measurement of income in accordance with 
generally accepted accounting principles. Prerequisite: Accounting 305. Mr. Tlwma>< 

513b. Special Topics in Accounting (3-0-3). 

Partnerships, consolidation, interim reporting, foreign operations, and fund accounting. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 511,512, and graduate standing or permission of instructor. Mr. Zeff 

521a, 522b. Managerial Accounting I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Cost behavior and estimation, profit planning, budgeting, capital investment decisions, 
transfer pricing, and accounting for manufacturing operations. Prerequisite: Accounting 305 
and graduate standing. Mr. Thomas 

524a. Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3-0-3). 

Accounting applications of quantitative, behavioral, and financial tools in planning, 
decision-making, and control. Prerequisite: Accounting 522 and graduate standing. Mr. Thoma.^ 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 107 

527a, 528b. Managerial Information Systems I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Basic concepts of developiriK and implementing computerized managerial information 

systems; informational needs for management and systems approach stressed. Prerequisite: 

Accounting 522 and graduate standing or Accounting 406 and permission of instructor. .S/o//' 

531a, 532b. Federal Taxation I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

A comprehensive examination of taxation as applied to individuals and corporations with an 
emphasis on tax planning. Prerequisite: Accounting 305 and graduate standing. Mr. Clarke 

534b. Special Topics In Taxation (2-0-2). 

.'\n examination of the basic elements of Federal estate and gift taxation, with consideration 
of both compliance and planning possibilities. Prerequisite: Accounting 531 and graduate 
standing. Mr. Vichig 

541a. Auditing I (4-0-4). 

Auditing standards and procedures, statistical sampling in applications, audit programs 
and reports, and professional ethics associated with the public accounting profession. Pre- 
requisite: Accounting 511, 512, and graduate standing. Mr. Vichig 

542b. Auditing II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Accounting 541. Prerequisite: Accounting 541 and graduate standing. 

Mr. McClelland 

543a. Seminar in Financial Accounting Practice (3-0-3). 

A comprehensive examination of currently effective authoritative pronouncements that 
govern financial accounting. Included are pronouncements of the AICPA, the FASB, and the 
SEC. Prerequisite: Accounting 511, 512, and graduate standing. Mr. Lucax 

551a, 552b. Seminar in Accounting Theory I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

The nature and verification of theories in general and a comparison and evaluation of 
competing accounting theories in particular. Prerequisites: Accounting 511, 512, and graduate 
standing. Mr. Zeff. Mr. Edwarch 

560b. Law for Accountants (3-0-3). 

Civil law: common law; equity: court systems; contracts; bailments and carriers; com- 
mercial paper; partnerships; corporations; unfair competition; bankruptcy; secured trans- 
actions; Uniform Commercial Code; Uniform Partnership Act. Prerequisite: graduate 
standing. Mr. Grcanias 

590b. Accounting Workshop (3-0-3). 

A review of recent literature on major accounting issues leading to writing of a substantial 
research paper. Prerequisite: Accounting 551. 552 and graduate standing. Staff 

597a, 598b. Independent Study (0-0-3 each semester). 

Independent study on an approved project under faculty supervision. Enrollment by special 
permission. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Staff 

600a,b. Doctoral Dissertation Research. Staff 

601a. History of Accounting Theory. Staff 

602b. The Price-Level Problem in Accounting. Staff 

603a. Alternative Basic Concepts of Accounting. Staff 

604b. Valuation Alternatives in Accounting. Staff 

605a. Economic Concepts Applied to Accounting. Staff 

606b. Measurement Theory Applied to Accounting. Staff 

607a. Philosophy of Science Concepts Applied to Accounting. Staff 

608b. Behavioral Research in Accounting. Staff 

609a. Research Methodology in Accounting. Staff 

610b. Efficient Markets Research in Accounting. Staff 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 



108 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Administrative Science 

A d m in ist ratio n Con rsei^ 

501a, 502b. Dean's Seminar (2-0-1 each semester). 

A weekly seminar held each semester in which invited speakers discuss a variety of manage- 
ment topics. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Mr. Sterling 

503a. Ethics, Law, and Managerial Decisions (3-0-3). 

A critical examination of the moral and legal problems arising from managerial decision- 
making and various moral and legal problems of importance to the managerial community. 

Mr. Brodij 

505a, b. Managerial Communications (3-0-3). 

Information flow in institutions and business: analysis of communications system com- 
ponents; proficiency in designing and writing materials for such systems. Prerequisite: graduate 
standing. M><. Dri>^kill 

511a, 512b. Industrial and Organizational Psychology I, II (3-0-3 each 

semester). 

Practical and theoretical aspects of psychology' applied to industrial and other organizations. 
Topics include work motivation and satisfaction, selection, placement training, and evaluation. 
Also offered as Psychology' 530. Mr. Howell 

514b. Organization Theory I (3-0-3). 

The development of organization theory, current approaches to complex organizations, and 
the operation of major types of complex organizations in both private and public sectors. Also 
offered as Political Science 527. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Mr. Cooper, Mr. Bush 

515a. Organization Theory II (3-0-3). 

Examination of problems or organizational analysis and design in both the public and 
private sectors. Also offered as Political Science 528. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

Mr. Cooper. Mr. Bu.'ih 

517a. Management of Bureaucracies (3-0-3). 

Problems in designing, maintaining, and controlling large organizations. Behavioral 
science and case study approaches. Emphasis on public bureaucracy, but problems apply to 
private organizations. Staff 

531a. Decision Analysis (3-0-3). 

Use of statistical methods to analyze decision problems. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

Staff 

532b. Operations Research (3-0-3). 

Survey of operations research models and their applications; topics include linear pro- 
gramming, game theory, decision theory, queuing models; inventory theory, dynamic pro- 
gramming, and Markov processes. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 280, Administration 
531 or Economics 350 or equivalent, and graduate standing. Staff 

534b. Topics in Decision Analysis (3-0-3). 

Decision models including decision trees, benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness models, 
handling hard and soft data; applications to energy management, ecology management, health 
care, and legal actions. Mr. Thrall 

541a. Managerial Decision Economics I (3-0-3). 

Analysis of business decision-making processes with particular emphasis on consumption- 
investment-production decisions in the context of various market structures. Prerequisite: 
Accounting 305 and Economics 211 or equivalent, and graduate standing. Mr. Bell 

542b Managerial Decision Economics II (3-0-3). 

Extension of Administration 541 to the macroeconomic environment of the firm: income, 
employment, interest, investment, consumption, international trade, fiscal and monetary 
policy! Prerequisite: Administration 541 or equivalent, and graduate standing. M/-. Edivards 

543a. Managerial Decision Economics III (3-0-3). 

Extension of Administration 541 to financial planning and control: allocation, acquisition, 
and control of funds; monetary system and financial institutions: investor relations, valuations, 
mergers, and governmental regulations. Prerequisite: Administration 541 and 542 or equiva- 
lent, and graduate standing. Mr. Valentine 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 109 

544b. Financial Management (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in financial pianning-andcontrol with emphasis on application of quantita- 
tive techniques. Prerequisite: Administration 543 or equivalent. Mr. Valentine 

551a, 552b. Public Management I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Policy making: in the public sector: managerial issues in government; analytical, budgetary, 
and financial techniques: economic policies; public control of private enterprise. Prerequisite: 
second year graduate standing. Mr. Wind.^ior. Mr. G/ca/n'ds 

561a, 562b. Legal Analysis and Processes I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

History and sources of the law; theories of jurisprudence; constitutional questions; legal 
analysis, statutory regulation: administrative law; legal problems peculiar to business; resolu- 
tion of conflict by judicial process. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Mr. Greania.'i, Mr. Oliver 

571a. International Relations and Business I (3-0-3). 

Emphasizes through comparative political analysis the societal conditions in the advanced 
industrial and developing countries and their impact on business. Political risk analysis projects. 
Also offered as Political Science 571. Mr. von der Mehden 

! I' J ';T' L ' \ :.: 
572b. International Relations and Business II (3-0-3). 

International trade, tariff, and financial policy from the perspective of the government de- 
cision maker and the individual businessman. Participating lecturers will examine political and 
commercial implications. Mr. Smith 

573a. The Multinational Corporation and U.S. Foreign Policy (3-0-3). 

Defining the responsibilities of the multinational firm within the context of contemporary 
foreign policy; problems for the multinational firm created by its role as a nonterritorial actor. 

Staff 

574b. International Problems of Energy Supply (3-0-3). 

Explores the energy question as a global imbalance between energy demand and supply, the 
policies of major consumer nations and OPEC's imbalance. Visiting authorities will discuss the 
problem. Also offered as Political Science 542. Mr. Doran 

591a, 592b. Management Workshop I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Interdisciplinary, team-taught examination of managerial and organizational problems in 
the private and public sectors; emphasis on case materials which illustrate fundamental 
principles of management practice. Prerequisite: second year graduate standing. Mr. Tuggle 

597a, 598b. Independent Study (3-0-3 each semester). 

Independent study on an approved project under faculty supervision. Enrollment by special 
permission. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Staff 



Managerial Studies Courses 

303b. Personal Finance (3-0-3). 

Planning, organization, and control for financial decisions. Mr. Hale 

404a. Investments (3-0-3). 

Security analysis and portfolio management. Mr. Hale 

495a, 496b. Senior Honors Thesis (0-0-3). 

Completion of senior honors thesis. Open only to seniors in managerial studies honors 
program. Staff 



110 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Anthropology 



I Professor Hole, Chairman; Professors Norbeek and Tyler 

Associate Professor P. W. Davis 
Adjunct Associate Professor Schreiber 
Assistant Professors Cushman, Marcus, and Uzzell 

Degrees Offered: B.A.; B.A. and Ph.D. in Behavioral Science (interdisciplinary 
program). 

The Undergraduate Major in Anthropology. Anthropology is a 
discipline that encompasses many subjects of study, all related to under- 
standing man and his culture. A student may organize a major in one or more of 
anthropology's principal fields or may combine a major in anthropology with 
one in another discipline. Students majoring in anthropology are required to 
take a total of thirty semester hours in anthropology (ten semester courses) 
including Anthropology 201 and nine other courses, seven of which must be 
upper-level courses. With the approval of the departmental adviser, a maxi- 
mum of two semester courses in biology, history, and the social sciences may be 
substituted for courses in anthropology. Within the general requirements, the 
program of each student majoring in anthropology is planned to meet individual 
interests and plans for future careers. Majors who plan to pursue graduate 
training toward a professional career in anthropology will need a reading 
knowledge of one or two European languages and are urged to enroll in under- 
graduate language courses. These majors are also urged to apply for admission 
to the honors program. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 90 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program 
of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Honors Program. The department offers an honors program to provide 
selected undergraduate majors with an opportunity to receive advanced train- 
ing, particularly in the planning and execution of independent research, 
within their chosen areas of specialization in anthropology. Students accepted 
into the program will undertake research leading to a thesis which must be 
presented at the end of the first semester of the senior year. Admission to 
the program and acceptance of the thesis is determined by the Honors Com- 
mittee. Interested students may apply to the honors program chairman, Mr. 
Cushman, during the first semester of the junior year. 

Graduate Work in Anthropology. The Doctor of Philosophy in Behavior- 
al Science with a major in anthropology is offered under an interdisciplinary 
program. See Behavioral Science. 

Anthropology Courses 

201a. Introduction to Anthropology (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the study of human societies and cultures within the main components 
of anthropology: archaeology, physical anthropology, linguistics, and cultural and social 
anthropology. Mr. Cushman, Mr. Norheck. Mr. Hole, and Mr. Davis 

207a. Introduction to General Linguistics (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the study of language and linguistics including basic synchronic concepts 
and techniques; phonetic transcription, phonological, grammatical, and semantic systems. 
Also offered as Linguistics 201. Mr. Dnri.^ 



ANTHROPOLOGY 111 

208b. Introduction to General Lingusities (3-0-3). 

A continuation of the above with an introduction to diachronic linpruistics and methods in 
linguistic prehistory. Also offered as Linguistics 202. Mi: Dnris 

225. Survey of Primitive Art (3-0-3).t 

African, oceanic, and North American Indian arts sampled. The style and function of art in 
preliterate societies discussed and history of Western appreciation considered. Also offered as 
History of Art 225. 

235a. Art of Beginning Civilizations (3-0-3). 

Comparative human e.xpression in arts and architecture from neolithic origins to the ancient 
Near East empires (Eg>'pt to Mesopotamia) and pre-Columbian America (Mexico to Peru). 

Mr. Scott 
302. Syntactic Analysis (3-0-3). t 

The theory and techniques of syntactic analysis. Prerequisite: Anthropology 207, 208 or 
consent of instructor. Also offered as Linguistics 302. 

303a. Modern Linguistic Theory (3-0-3). 

A survey of the development of linguistic theory from de Saussure to the present. Pre- 
requisite: Anthropology 207, 208 or consent of instructor. Also offered as Linguistics 303. 

Mr. Daris 

304b. Phonological Analysis (3-0-3). 

The techniques and assumptions of phonological analysis: an examination of various 
phonological theories current in modern linguistics. Prerequiste: Anthropology 207, 208 or 
consent of instructor. Also offered as Linguistics 301. Mr. Davis 

305. Historical Linguistics (3-0-3). t 

Mechanisms of language change in terms of transformational generative grammar are de- 
veloped and related to the social and geographical context of language and language acquisi- 
tion. Also offered as Linguistics 305. 

306b. Anthropological Study of Religion (3-0-3). 

Comparative survey of religion and magic, and anthropological interpretations of their 
nature and roles in human life. Mr. Norbeck 

310b. World Ethnography (3-0-3). 

Introduction to cultural geography through survey of geographical and cultural areas of the 
world. Emphasis on the interrelationships between human societies and their physical environ- 
ments. No prerequisite. Also offered as Geography 310. Mr.Cm^hnian 

312b. North American Ethnology (3-0-3). 

A general survey of native cultures north of Mexico. Intensive study of selected peoples in 
light of the processes of culture. Mr. Norbeck 

313. Language and Culture (3-0-3). t 

, Investigates the systematic relations between linguistic form and expression and culture. 
No prerequisite. Also offered as Linguistics 310. 

316. Fundamentals of Archaeology (3-0-3). t 

Principles and methods of archaeology as exemplified by case studies. 

320. Old World Prehistory (3-0-3). t 

A survey of the origin and development of human culture to the beginnings of literate 
civilizations in Southwest Asia. Emphasis on Africa, Southwest Asia, and Europe. 

321. New World Prehistory (3-0-3). t 

Man's entry into the Americas; his dispersal and varied ecological adaptations; the develop- 
ment of these cultures to the beginning of food-producing and of village life. 

322. New World Prehistory (3-0-3). t 

The evolution of New World civilizations, in Mesoamerica and the Central Andes, to the 
Spanish conquest. 

323. Archaeological Techniques (2-4-3). t 

Introduction to archaeological theory as it relates to excavation; the principal techniques 
used in field work, laboratory analysis of artifacts, and interpretation of archaeological data. 
Prerequisite: Anthropology 316, 320, 321, or 322. 



112 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

325. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3-0-3). f 

Survey of the Spanish and Portuguese speaking peoples of the New World. Development of 
cultures and subcultures as a response to local, national, and world situations. 

326a. African Art (3-0-3). 

The traditional tribal arts of sub-Saharan West Africa in the context of their cultures. 
Function and style areas stressed. Consideration given to common forms, their meaning 
and distribution. Also offered as History of Art 325. Mr. Scott 

327a, b; 328a, b. Problems in Media in Anthropology (1-6-3 each semester). 

Application of film and video tape to problems in anthropology as research method or as 

means of communicating anthropological observations and ideas. Grounding in film and video 

tape techniques followed by individual projects. Also offered as Arts 327, 328. Staff 

330. Early Civilization (3-0-3).t 

The growth and characteristics of civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, Mesoamerica, 
and Peru are examined historically and comparatively. 

331b. Culture Contact (3-0-3). 

Intercultural communication and understanding, including Western and non-Western; 
cultural contact from early European explorations, through colonization, to contemporary 
development and modernization. Mr. Marcus 

332. Physical Anthropology (3-0-3).t 

Cultural and biological factors in the evolution of man, human genetics, races of man and 
problems of race. 

333. The Nature of Culture (3-0-3).t 

Introduction to anthropology, designed for juniors and seniors, with major emphasis on 
cultural and social anthropology. 

334. Primate Behavior (3-0-3).t 

Comparative social behavior of nonhuman primates. Description of major types of social 
structure: interrelationships between social behavior and ecological, physiological, and genetic 
factors. 

335. Anthropology of Education (3-0-3).t 

A consideration of education in general and problems of contemporary education in the 
United States from an anthropological perspective. 

336. Oceanic Art (3-0-3).t 

The art of the aboriginal peoples of Melanesia, Polynesia, Micronesia, and Australia. 
Emphasis on stylistic analysis and function of objects within the context of each culture; the 
meaning, origin, and diffusion of similar forms. Also offered as History of Art 336. 

341. Kinship and Social Structure (3-0-3).t 

Introduction to anthropological concepts and theories relating to kinship, marriage, and 
social structure in cross-cultural perspective. 

348. Economic Anthropology (3-0-3).t 

Comparative structure and operation of economic systems in small-scale, non- Western 
societies and the contemporary development of such systems in larger national and international 
entities. 

350. Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3-0-3).t 

Ethnology of the Middle East, including northern Africa. 

352a. Peoples and Cultures of Oceania (3-0-3). 

The ethnology of the three major cultural divisions of Oceania: Polynesia, Melanesia, and 
Micronesia. Emphasis on political and cultural evolution of Pacific societies from pre-European 
times to the present. Mr. Marcus 

353. Cultures of India (3-0-3).t 

Summary of the prehistory, ethnography, and ethnology of the Indian subcontinent. 
Special emphasis on ideology and social organization. 

356. Peoples and Cultures of China (3-0-3).t 

A survey of the prehistory and ethnology of China with special emphasis on traditional 
Chinese society, regional variation, Chinese-minority relations, and the Communist trans- 
formation. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 113 

361a. Culture and Personality (3-0-3). 

Consideration of studies of interaction between personality and culture in various societies 
from the point of view of cultural relativity. Mr. C^zzcll 

366. Political Anthropology (3-0-3).t 

Emphasis on fundamentals of political order in kingships, bands, tribes, and feudal systems. 
The political systems and processes of these social systems compared with those of modern, 
complex societies. 

371a. The Anthropology of Law (3-0-3). 

Social conflict and methods of dispute management in Western and non-Western societies 
Comparison of legal institutions in band, tribal, early state, and complex industrial societies. 

Mr. Mnn-ux 

373a. The Anthropology of Literature (3-0-3). 

Comparison of oral traditions and written literatures. Western and non-Western, and of 
their use for ethnographical and ethnohistorical research. Mr. Ciinhmnn 

381a. The Study of Cities (3-0-3). 

Comparative study of cities in different areas of the world, identifying constants and 
variables of urban culture, ancient and modern. Mr. Uzzcll 

383b. Utopian Societies and Communes (3-0-3). 

A consideration of Utopian and communal societies in historical and cross-cultural per- 
spectives as alternatives to the dominant social structures and cultures in which they developed. 

Mr. Marcus 

385. History and Culture of Japan (3-0-3).t 

A general survey of Japanese culture from its prehistoric beginnings with emphasis on 
modern times. 

400a. Ethnological Theory (3-0-3). 

Seminar surveying major trends of ethnological theory from the beginning of anthropology. 
Also offered as Behavioral Science 515. Mr. Norbeck 

402b. Cultural Ecology (3-0-3). 

Discussion of systematic relations of humans and their biological and social environments. 

Mr. Uzzell 

403. Field Methods and Analytic Techniques (3-0-3).t 

The techniques of observation, analysis, and recording of human language. Prerequisite: 
Anthropology 207, 208 or consent of instructor. Also offered as Linguistics 406. 

404a, b. Independent Study (0-0-3 each semester). 

Directed reading and preparation of written papers on anthropological subjects notoffered 
in the curriculum and advanced study of subjects on which courses are offered. Staff 

406b. Cognitive Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Focuses on the relations between thought, language, and culture. Special emphasis will be 
given to systems of folk classification and the logical principles underlying them. Also offered 
as Linguistics 410. Mr. Tiiler 

407, 408. Special Topics in Anthropology (3-0-3 each semester).! 

Lectures or seminar devoted to restricted topics reflecting current research interests of the 
staff. May be repeated for credit. 

410. Archaeological Analysis (3-0-3).t 

Tutorial course covering techniques of studying and interpreting archaeological data. 
Students work individually on collections of excavated material. Limited to 10 students. Pre- 
requisite: Anthropology 316. 

420a. Classics in Ethnography (3-0-3). 

Detailed consideration of selected ethnographic accounts with primary emphasis on their 
contributions to the development of anthropological theory and the refinement of field 
techniques. Mr. Cii.'ihman 

430b. Medical Anthropology (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the rapidly growing field of medical anthropology, which concerns an- 
thropological aspects of medicine. Mr. Uzzell 



114 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

438. Indian Art of North America (3-0-3).t 

Indian art of the United States and Canada with emphasis on the Southwest, the Northwest 
Coast, and the Alaskan Eskimo. Formal analysis of types, meaning, and function. Alsoofferedas 
History of Art 438. 

444b. The Ethnography of the Past (3-0-3). 

Examination of anthropological approaches to the reconstruction of social history in 
Western and non-Western societies with primary emphasis on the problems of interpreting 
original historical materials. Mr. CKshniaii 

446b. Ancient Art of South America (3-0-3). 

Survey of the evolution of the arts in Andean civilizations from preceramic coastal com- 
munities to the Inca state. Includes northern South America, lower Central America, and An- 
tilles. Also offered as History of Art 446. Mr. Scott 

447. Ancient Art of Mesoamerica (3-0-3). t 

Art of Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras, from the Olmec culture (c. 1200-600 B.C.) to the 
Aztec. Chronological development, stylistic analysis, and the origin and meaning of forms. Also 
offered as History of Art 447. 

450. Ethnography of Urban Places (3-0-3). t 

A seminar that will provide students an opportunity to plan and conduct ethnographic 
studies in the Houston area. Also offered as Behavioral Science 550. 

490b, 491a. Directed Honors Research (0-0-3 each semester). 

A two-semester sequence of independent research culminating in the preparation and de- 
fense of an honors thesis. Open only to candidates formally accepted into the honors program. 

Staff 

508b. Linguistic Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Devoted to the application of linguistic theory and method in the analysis of cultural mater- 
ials. Also offered as Behavioral Science 546 and Linguistics 412. Mr. Tijler 

510. Current Topics and Problems in Anthropology (3-0-3). t 

Advanced seminar on anthropological topics and problems including major new subjects 
of investigation. Also offered as Behavioral Science 510. 



School of Architecture 



Professor Mitchell, Dean; Professors Cannady, Crane, Evans, Krahl, 

Morehead, Ransom, Taniguchi, and Todd 

Adjunct Professors Caudill, Thomsen, and Willems 

Associate Professors Papametriou, S. W. Parsons, 

Rowe, A. M. Santos, A. P. Santos, and D. L. Williams 

Adjunct Associate Professors Bartlett, Douglass, France, 

Perrine, and Rea 

Assistant Professors Casbarian, A. Z. Parks, and Sharpe 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Cech, Montgomery, and Turner 

Lecturers Blackburn, C. J. Brown, Carrara, Colaco, 

Kerner, Linville, Lord, McDaniel, Mixon, Moore, Naman, 

Scoular, and Tapley 

Instructor Bavinger 

Degree)^ Offered: B.A., B.Arch., M.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. 



Preceptors 

The Architects Collaborative, Inc. Brown/Sullivan Associates 

Cambridge, Massachusetts Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



ARCHITECTURE 115 



Cambridge Seven Associates 
Cambridge, Massachusetts '^- • 

Caudill Rowlett Scott 
Houston, Texas 

Community Planning & Development 
Woodlands Development Corp. 
Houston, Texas 

David A. Crane & Partners 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Daniel, Mann, Johnson & Mendenhall 
Los Angeles, California 

Gensler & Associates 
Houston, Texas 

Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum 
San Francisco, California 

McKittrick, Drennan, Richardson & 

Wallace 
Houston, Texas 

Mitchell/Giurgola Associates 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



S. I. Morris Associates 
Houston, Texas 

C. F. Murphy Associates 
Chicago, Illinois 

I. M. Pei & Partners 
New York, New York 

Rice Center for Community Design 

and Research 
Houston, Texas 

Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill 
Chicago, Illinois 

Robert A. M. Stern Associates 
New York, New York 

Vastu-Shilpa, B. V. Doshi 
Ahmedabad, India 

Venturi & Rauch, Architects 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Wallace, McHarg, Roberts & Todd 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Frank R. Welch, Architect 
Midland, Texas ,>. >'-, 



The School of Architecture seeks to contribute through teaching and 
research to a more humane environment. Its primary educational missons are 
teaching and research, development of a broad liberal education for under- 
graduates in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional 
education at the graduate and post graduate level in architecture and urban 
design. 

These programs are offered in the setting of a small school to provide 
intimate student-faculty interaction, freedom for learning, and unrestricted 
institutional cooperation within and outside the university. 



Degrees Offered. Five degrees are offered: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Architecture, Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture in Urban De- 
sign, and Doctor of Architecture. The Bachelor of Arts, a liberal arts degree, 
may emphasize a major in either architecture or architectural studies; the two 
programs are described below. The B.A. is awarded after successful comple- 
tion of the first four years of study. The Bachelor of Architecture is available to 
recipients of the B.A. degree from Rice and requires two additional years of 
work, one of which will be an in-service preceptorship in a professional office. 

The master's degrees are awarded after successful completion of one and 
one-half to three and one-half years of study beyond the B.A., depending upon 
previous undergraduate and professional studies. Recipients of the B.A. degree 



116 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

from Rice normally undertake a minimum of three years of further work for 
one of the Master of Architecture degrees of which one year will be an in- 
service preceptorship in a professional office. Approval of Rice students for 
admission to either bachelor's or master's programs is contingent upon evalua- 
tion of the student's undergraduate academic record at the conclusion of the 
fourth year of study. Other applicants for the master's degree are evaluated in 
terms of their prior preparation, which may reduce their required period of 
study at Rice. The Master of Architecture is an accredited first professional 
degree, whereas the Master of Architecture in Urban Design requires prior or 
concurrent completion of accredited bachelor's or master's degrees. 



Undergraduate Program in Architecture. For both the B.A. and the 
B.Arch. degrees, the first two years center upon a carefully integrated study of 
the principles of architecture. In the third and fourth years students are en- 
couraged to develop their own interests and talents through an individual set 
of seminars, studio projects, and interdisciplinary courses. 

Below is a suggested course of study for either the B.A. or the B.Arch. 
degree. The order in which courses are taken is optional subject to the follow- 
ing exceptions: (1) health and physical education must be taken in the fresh- 
man year, and (2) failure to take prerequisite courses in the earlier years may 
cause serious problems later on. 



First year: 

History of Art, six semester hours 

(two semester courses) 
Physics 121, 122 (for architects) 
Architecture 101, 102 
Electives, twelve semester hours 

(four semester courses) 
Physical Education 
ROTC, if elected 



Second year: 

Architecture 201, 202 
Architecture 213, 214 
History of Art, six semester hours 

(two semester courses) 
Electives, twelve semester hours 

(four semester courses) 
ROTC, if elected 



Third and foiuih years: 

Architecture 301, 302 
Architecture 401, 402 
Architecture 313, 314 
Electives, at least thirty semester 
hours (ten semester courses) 

Preceptorship year: 
Architecture 500 



Fifth year (B. Arch, program): 

Architecture 601, 602 

Electives, at least twelve semester 

hours (four semester courses) 
Electives (for M.Arch. applicants; 

at least six semester hours or two 

semester courses) 



In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 38 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 130 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 
and 51. 



ARCHITECTURE 117 

B.A. students have two options in tlieir choice of a preprofessional major 
during the third and fourth years: 

(1) The architecture major requires two years of advanced studio courses 
and additional professional group requirements that permit reasonable elec- 
tive freedom. This curriculum serves the needs of students who anticipate 
professional studies at an advanced level and who wish to have the alternatives 
of doing so through either the Bachelor of Architecture at Rice or various first 
professional master's degrees at Rice or other institutions. 



(2) The architectural studies major requires two years of advanced 
work combining architectural studies with other fields. It is focused on an ap- 
proved, preprofessional theme for interdisciplinary studies chosen by the in- 
dividual and approved by an adviser. Application to this program must be 
made during the second year of studies. Reduced architectural course require- 
ments encourage the pursuit of a double major with another department. This 
curriculum can be regarded as a liberal arts education for its own sake, but it 
also offers opportunity to prepare for a wide variety of graduate studies and 
career options in different design and planning related fields at Rice or other 
institutions. This program provides opportunity to pursue architectural or 
urban design master's degree programs at Rice by entering through the 
Qualifying Graduate Workshop program, but it does not include the option of a 
Rice Bachelor of Architecture. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the B.A. degree with either above major, 
students may apply during the senior year for admission to the appropriate 
advanced professional degree programs. 

Auxiliary services at Rice span the gap between school and practice: the 
preceptorship program, the visiting lecturer series, and the visiting critic 
series. The preceptorship program is designed to bridge classroom studio 
learning and professional practice. Qualified students who have been admitted 
to the professional degree programs work for an entire year with outstanding 
architects throughout the world who are designated by the school as preceptors. 
The timing of preceptorship service varies according to the level of design and 
technical proficiency reached during the B.A. program. For those admitted to 
the Bachelor of Architecture the preceptorship will occur immediately on the 
receipt of the B.A. 

Notes 

1. History of Art 205, 206 are required in the first two years and will be sched- 
uled where history of art electives are noted. History of Art 345, 346 are re- 
quired for a major in architecture. 

2. Electives must satisfy School of Architecture distribution requirements in 
addition to general university requirements. 

3. A student who has studied physics in high school may substitute approved 
natural science courses in place of physics. 

4. Studio courses (Architecture 201, 202; 301, 302; and 401, 402) which carry 
six semester hours each semester in the sophomore, junior, and senior years 
count toward graduation as the equivalent of one course per semester in the 
sophomore year and as two courses per semester in the junior and senior 
years. 



118 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

5. Students contemplating later specialization in the fields of structural 
or environmental engineering are advised to take Mathematics 101, 102 
and Physics 101, 102 and 132. 



Graduate Programs in Architecture. The School of Architecture offers 
the degrees of Master of Architecture and Master of Architecture in Urban 
Design. Within the two degree programs varied areas of interest are open to 
students, including: 

1. Housing and community development 

2. Community facilities and community development 

3. Transportation and urban infrastructure 

4. Health care facilities and delivery systems 

5. Land and natural resource utilization 

An advanced building design curriculum is the basis for the Master of 
Architecture degree program. This program is designed to provide the stu- 
dent an individual course of study with a wide choice of special project, re- 
search, and internship opportunities both within and outside the School of 
Architecture. 

The first year of the urban design curriculum is composed of studio and 
lecture courses. The second year allows student choice and specialization in 
the areas of interest listed above. 

Joint degree programs with other disciplines are available for students 
with special interests. The Texas School of Public Health offers a cooperative 
program with the Rice School of Architecture. Joint programs within the 
university include behavioral science, computer science and technology, and 
environmental science. 

Clinical practice is an important dimension of graduate education in 
architecture at Rice. Normally, one semester plus a summer (or one summer 
in special cases) will be spent in full-time clinical education for academic cred- 
it during a two-year master's program. Two alternative vehicles for cHnical 
service are available: 

The Rice Center for Community Design and Research is an off-campus, 
nonprofit corporation concernted with practical problems of planning 
and designing, clinical education, public service, contract research, and 
professional services. Students and faculty of the School of Architecture 
are employed in the center, where they serve in professional teams on ac- 
tual projects with experts from many other fields. 

Full time internships provide clinical service in applied research and in- 
novative design projects, under supervision of practitioners in the Hous- 
ton area as determined by the special expertise of the chosen office. 

Graduate studies are open to candidates who hold the degree of Bachelor 
of Architecture, or who have a Bachelor of Arts with a major in architecture. 
Candidates with a Bachelor of Architecture degree are normally expected to 
complete three academic semesters plus one semester of clinical eduation. 
Candidates with a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in architecture are 
normally expected to complete four academic semesters plus one semester of 
clinical education, which may occur in the intervening summer. Students 
without sufficient architectural background are expected to complete a pro- 
gram of special studies before admission to one of the graduate options. This 



ARCHITECTURE 119 

program takes a minimum of two semesters, depending on the individual's 
preparation, and stresses history, theory, technology, and design techniques. 

Students not possessing a prior first professional degree and completing 
the Urban Design program requirements will receive a Master of Architec- 
ture degree with a certificate in Urban Design. 

For students having a bachelor's degree with no architectural back- 
ground the Qualifying Graduate Workshop program is offered. This is norm- 
ally a seven-semester program leading to the Master of Architecture degree. 
The first four semesters consist of special studio offerings plus selected sem- 
inar and lecture courses. The last three semesters are spent in the regular grad- 
uate programs. 

An option for a master's thesis in lieu of part of the clinical education 
requirements is available for students who are oriented toward research 
and teaching in architecture or urban design. 



Doctor of Architecture. Admission to the Doctor of Architecture 
program requires a bachelor's or a master's degree in architecture. A student 
entering with a master's degree normally takes one and one-half years of course 
work before the qualifying examination; a student with a bachelor's degree 
normally requires two and one-half years of course work before the qualifying 
examination. Candidates should be prepared for advanced analytic and 
creative work in their specialized field. Such preparation may include foreign 
languages, statistics, or a computer language. This requirement will be 
established individually when the student is admitted. 

After successful completion of all required course work plus the language 
examination or equivalent, students may apply for the qualifying examination. 
At this time students must submit an outline of their research program for the 
doctoral dissertation. This dissertation must represent an original contribution 
to knowledge in the field of architecture. The completion of the dissertation and 
the passing of the final oral examination required for the doctorate in 
architecture take a minimum of one year. 



A rch itectu re Cou rses 

101a. Principles of Architecture I (2-6-4). 

Visual studies of restricted dimensions, explorations using simple tools and materials to de- 
velop an awareness of the environment. Requisite for architecture majors. Limited enrollment. 

Mi.'^s Erans. Mr. Parks 

102b. Principles of Architecture I (2-6-4). 

A development of communication of formal information from further investigation of 
visual structures and their order. Requisite for architecture majors, but Architecture 123 may 
be substitued. By permission of instructor only. Miss Evans. Mr. Parks 

123. Design Analysis and Representation (1-6-3). t 

132b. Changing Perspectives of Architecture (0-3-1). 

Introductory tutorial. Reading, field trips, and observation of current events and public 
affairs: values, mstitutions, and nature of environmental changes relating to future role and 
Dractice of architecture. Staff 

201a, 202b. Principles of Architecture II (3-9-6 each semester). 

Introduction to concepts of beginning architectural design. Manipulation of visual struc- 
ture to render formal and operational information. Design process as problem-solving with 
emphasis on conscious method. Requisite for architecture majors. 

Mr. Ca.'^bariaH, Visiting Critics 



120 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

213a, 214b. Structural and Construction Systems (3-0-3 each semester). 

Introduction to characteristics of materials, basic structrual analysis, design of wood and 
masonry structures, field trips. Requisite for architecture majors. Mr. Morehead 

301a, 302b. Architectural Problems: Studio (2-12-6 each semester). 

Variety of intermediate level problems for developing comprehensive experience in design 
methods and processes. Requisite for preprofessional major in architecture. Prerequisite: Archi- 
trecture 201, 202. Mr. Pan^om^. Mr. Taniquchi, Mr. Todd. Mr. Cannadtj. Visiting Cntics 

308b. Architecture for Non-Architects (3-0-3). 

Designed to increase awareness of architectural issues through site visits and comparative 
building studies, guest architects, design problems, lectures, readings, and discussion. Impact 
of architecture on its users and its relation to institutions that produce it. Enrollment by per- 
mission of instructor. Mr. Cn.^barian 

313a,b; 314b. Intermediate Architectural Technology (3-0-3 each 
semester). 

Analysis and design of structural systems. Investigation of environmental controls 
systems. Selfpaced "Keller Method" with lectures and exercises. Prerequisite: Architec- 
ture 213, 214. Mr. Morehead 

315a, 316b. Architectural Technology Laboratory (Credit variable). 

Laboratory exercises for testing of structural and environmental control systems and 
subsystems. Mr. Merwin 

322b. Architectural Presentation Techniques (3-0-3). 

Exploration and practice with varying types of presentation techniques with emphasis on 
graphic communication of architectural concepts. Staff 

331b. Housing Design Problems and Principles (3-0-3). 

Review of international problems in housing and community development. Design 
criteria and processes responding to user needs and aspirations. Open to students "outside of 
architecture. Mm. Santoi^ 

334b. Human Behavioral and Social Impacts of Environmental Design 

(3-0-3). 

Overview of research, theory, and practice of relating building design and community 
development to individual and collective behavioral responses and/or societal needs. Open to 
students outside of architecture. Staff 

336b. Architecture and Urban Issues (3-0-3). 

Major issues and problems confronting metropolitan centers; emphais on physical and 
built environment. Visiting lecturers on transportation, housing, education, minority pro- 
blems, new communities, physical development and redevelopment. Course is open to all stu- 
dents. Staff 

341a. Theory and Practice in Urban Design (3-0-3). 

Comparative analysis of recent theory and practice in projecting and controlling urban 
growth and change. Open to students outside of architecture. Mr. Mitchell 

342b. History and Theory of Modern Movements in Architecture and 
Urban Design (3-0-3). 

A critical review of theory and specific examples of leading schools of thought in archi- 
tecture and urban design from the early twentieth century to the present. Open to all students 
outside of architecture by permission of instructor. Mr. Santot^ 

351a. Design Methods (3-0-3). 

Rational processes of design, problem-solving methods, simple statistics, data surveys and 
handling, graph theory, graphic information systems, computer applif ations in design. 

Mr. Sharpe 



ARCHITECTURE 121 

352b. Computer Applications in Architectural Programming and Eval- 
uation (3-0-3). 

Seminar on present and potential uses of electronic computers in architectural program- 
ming, graphic display, and problem analysis. Limited enrollment. Staff 

401a, 402b. Architectural Problems: Studio (2-12-6 each semester). 
Vertically integrated studio with Architecture 301, 302. Same description. 

Mr. ParsotiK. Mr. Taniguchi, Mr. Cnnnady, Mr. Todd, I'isitiiig Critic-^ 

413a. Design of Structural Systems I (3-0-3). 

Structural systems for wood buildings, high-rise buildings, concrete thin-shell roofs, space 
trusses: also intermediate-span bridges, long-span suspension bridges. Graduate credit offered 
with approval of school. Prerequisite: Architecture 313, 314. Meets with Civil Engineering 413. 

Mr. Krahl 

414b. Design of Structural Systems II (3-0-3). 

Structural systems for low-rise buildings, industrialized building systems, cable-support- 
ed roofs, inflatables: also short-span bridges, long-span truss bridges. Graduate credit offered 
with approval of school. Prerequisite: Architecture 313, 314. Meets with Civil Engineering 414. 

Mr. Krnhl 

415a. Advanced Architectural Technology Laboratory (Credit variable). 

Laboratory exercises for testing of structural and environmental controls systems and sub- 

stystems. Mr. Merwin 

417a, 418b. Teaching of Technology (0-0-3 each semester). 

Classroom teaching under the supervision of the instructors. Mr. Morcbcad 

442b. Recent Trends in Architecture (3-0-3). 

An historic-critical presentation of modern architecture since World War IL examination 
of its maturity and transformation on a global scale. By permission of instructor. 

Mr. Papademctriou 

451a,b. Architectural Measured Drawings (3-0-3). 

Analysis of historic and contemporary examples of architecture or civil engineering 
through measured drawings constructed to standards. Drawings become part of a permanent 
architectural archive. Limited enrollment. Permission of instructor required. 

Mr. Papademetriou 

461a,b. Special Projects in Architecture (Credit variable). 

Independent research or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member. Subject 
to approval of faculty adviser and director. Very limited enrollment. Staff 

500a,b. Preceptorship Program (0-0-15). 

Requisite for admission to graduate studies in architecture for all recipients of Rice B.A. 
degrees in preprofessional or area majors. Student completes 9-12 months of full-time intern- 
ship under guidance of an appointed preceptor. Mr. Pars(»i.-< 

501a, 502b.Qualifying Graduate Workshop I, II (10-15-15 each semester). 
Requisite for admission to graduate professional program options in architecture or urban 
design for students with non-architectural bachelor's degree. Lectures, seminars, laboratories, 
and design studio projects adjusted to individual needs. Prerequisites determined by the Com- 
mittee on Advanced Standing within the School of Architecture. 

Mr. Todd, Mr. Papademetriou, Staff 

503a, 504b. Qualifying Graduate Workshop III, IV (5-15-10 each 

semester). 

Design studio to follow Architecture 501, 502. Preparation for entering studios in the reg- 
ular graduate programs in architecture and urban design in the following semester. 

Mr. Santo,<:, Mr. Taniguclu 

601a,b. Architectural Problems: Studio (5-15-10). 

Emphasis on abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes of 
designing specific buildings and facilities. Prerequisite: Architecture 500; or Architecture 501, 
502, 503: or B. Arch, degree. Mr. Santos, Mr. Cannady, Staff 

603a, 604a,b. Urban Design Problems: Studio (5-15-10 each semester). 

Developing abstract thought and applied design and planning capabilities to total urban 
systems of facilities, large-scale developments, or other broad environmental action. Prerequi- 
site: Architecture 500: or Architecture 501, 502, 503; or B.Arch. degree. Requisite for M.Arch. 
Urban Design degree. Mr. Crane, Mr. Rowe, Mrs. Santos, Staff 



122 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

606b. Thesis (0-14-10). 

Independent investigations in architecture or urban design culminating in preparation 
and presentation of a master's thesis. Staff 

608b. Architecture for Non-Architects (0-0-3). 

Classroom teaching under the supervision of the instructor. For elective credit only. 

Mr. Casbarian 

611a. Design of Structural Systems I (3-0-3). 

Structural systems for wood buildings, high-rise buildings, concrete thin-shell roofs, space 
trusses: also intermediate-span bridges, long-span suspension bridges. Prerequisite: Archi- 
tecture 313, 314. Meets with Civil Engineering 517. Mr. Krahl 

612b. Design of Structural Systems II (3-0-3). 

Structrual systems for low-rise buildings, industrialized building systems, cable-support- 
ed roofs, inflatables: also short-span bridges, long-span bridges. Prerequisite: Architecture 
313. 314. Meets with Civil Engineering 518. Mr. Krahl 

613a, 614b. Teaching of Technology (0-0-3 each semester). 

Same as Architecture 417, 418. Mr. Morehead 

615a, 616b. Industrialized Building Technologies I, II (3-0-3 each 

semester). 

Changing forces in the building industry contributing to industrialized processes and tech- 
nologies of factory production, distribution, assembly, site erection of building components, and 
management. Staff 

621a. Theory and Practice in Urban Design. (3-0-3). 

Comparative analysis of recent theory and practice in projecting and controlling urban 
growth and change. Mr. Mitchell 

622b. History and Theory of Modern Movements in Architecture and 
Urban Design (3-0-3). 

Same as Architecture 342. Mr. Santo.^ 

626b. Transportation Facilities, Systems Design and Environment 

(3-0-3). 

Theories and practice related to the professional urban designer's role in multidisciplinary 
transportation planning teams. Mr. Aii.^trancl 

627a. Housing Design Problems Theory and Principles (3-0-3). 

Same as Architecture 331. Mr.^. Santox 

628b. Graduate Seminar in History and Theory of Modern Movements in 
Architecture and Urban Design (3-0-3). 

A critical review of history and specific examples of leading schools of thought in archi- 
tecture and urban design from the early twentieth century to the present. Mr. Santot^ 

630b. Recent Trends in Architecture (3-0-3). 

Same as Architecture 442. Mr. Papndemetriou 

632b. Problem-Solving Methods in Architecture and Urban Design 

(3-0-3). 

Advanced problem-solving seminar and case studies. Application of rational methods 
and tools, modelling and simulation techniques. Prerequisite: equivalent of Architecture 351. 

Mr. Roire 

634b. Architectural Programming (3-0-3). 

Fundamental procedures of programming architectural facilities and systems for various 
types of public and private construction. Emphasis on health care and correctional facilities. 

Mr. Dougla><.^ 

637a, 638b. Advanced Computer Projects (Credit variable). 

Individual projects in the application of computer technology to architectural program- 
ming, planning, and urban design, graphic display, and problem analysis. Mr. Rowe 

640b. Seminar in Recent Trends in Architecture. (3-0-3). 

Same as Architecture 442. Mr. Papademetriou 



ARCHITECTURE 123 

642b. Human Behavioral and Social Impacts of Environmental Design 

(3-0-3). 
Same as Architecture 334. Staff 

646b. Seminar on Natural Environmental Factors in Community Develop- 
ment (3-0-3). 
Readings and discussion of natural environment factors affecting and affected by the 

development of the built environment. Review of sources of data, analytical procedures, and 

implementation tactics. 

648b. Graduate Seminar on Housing Design Principles and Problems 

(3-0-3). 

Review of international problems in housing and community development. Design criteria 
and processes responding to user needs and aspirations. Mrs. Santos 

651a, 652b. Planning Law and Land Development I, H (3-0-3 each 
semester). 

Legal and economic considerations in practical land and building development: public 
controls, private/public sector relationships, entrepreneurial objectives, financing methods. 
Case studies in total development "packaging." Mr. Mi.n»i. Mr. Brown 

655a. Housing Programs in the United States (3-0-3). 

Critical review of housing programs under government assistance as they have evolved 
historically: factors shaping new policies and relationships in housing delivery at national, 
state, and local levels. Open to students outside of architecture. Mr. Lord 

700a,b. Practicum (0-0-12). 

Full-time internship service in approved local offices under interdisciplinary supervision. 
Emphasis on "real world" design, planning, or research experience. Special tuition. May be 
taken in any semester or in summer. Clinical Staff 

710c. Summer Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

Independent graduate research supervised by faculty member subject to approval of 
student's faculty adviser and director. Staff 

711a,b. Special Projects (Credit variable). 

Independent research or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member subject to 
approval of the student's faculty adviser and director. Staff 

751a,b. Graduate Research. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



Art and Art History 



Associate Professor Oliver-Smith, Chairman 

Professors K. T. Brown, Camfield, Havens, O'Neil, D. G. Parsons, 

and Winningham 

Visiting Professor Friedlander 

Associate Professor Boterf 

Assistant Professors Poulos, J. F. Scott, Widrig, and Wirz 

Lecturers Badner and Huberman 

Visiting Lecturer McEvilley 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.F.A. 

The Department of Art and Art History offers courses in three distinct 
disciplines: the history of art, studio art (painting, drawing, sculpture, etc.), 
and film and photography. Majors may elect to concentrate their study in 
any of these areas of specialization. 

Requirements for a Major in Fine Arts. A minimum of thirty-six semes- 
ter hours (twelve semester courses) is required, including at least nine semes- 
ter hours (three courses) in the history of art and nine semester hours (three 



124 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

courses) selected from studio, film, and photography. Double majors must 
take a minimum of thirty semester hours (ten courses), including at least nine 
semester hours (three courses) in both the creative arts and the history of art. 
History of Art 205, 206 are required of all majors. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 
84 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total pro- 
gram of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, 
pages 50 and 51. 

A reading knowledge of French, German, or Italian is strongly recom- 
mended for all majors, especially those who intend to take 300- or 400-level 
courses in the history of art. 

Students interested in further guidance in planning the Bachelor of Arts 
degree with a major in art and art history should consult departmental faculty 
advisers. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts Program. The Bachelor of Fine Arts program 
consists of a fifth year of intensive study in the creative arts to be taken after a 
student has obtained a B.A. degree in art at Rice or its equivalent at another 
university. Candidates possessing a B.A. degree with a major in a field other 
than art may in exceptional cases be admitted to the program. Special fifth- 
year courses are available to the B.F.A. candidate only, in addition to advanced 
courses normally offered by the department. Satisfactory completion of a total 
of thirty semester hours or the equivalent in approved major electives at the 
300, 400, or 500 level is required for the B.F.A. degree. 

Admission to the program is determined by the Committee on Examina- 
tions and Standing on recommendation of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Commit- 
tee. For further information about application forms, deadlines, admission 
standards, and the like, write to the chairman of the Department of Art and 
Art History. 



Sewall Art Gallery 

Chester Boterf, Director 

Sewall Art Gallery, located on the main floor of Sewall Hall, operates 
under the auspices of the Department of Art and Art History. Exhibitions of 
moderate size, usually directly related to departmental courses, are held 
throughout the academic year. Works from the departmental collection, stu- 
dent exhibitions, as well as shows drawn from outside sources are recurrent 
parts of the program. 

Institute for the Arts 

Dominique de Menil, Director 

The Institute for the Arts organizes exhibitions and publishes catalogs of 
national and international interest. It operates the Rice University Museum 
located at the University Boulevard and Stockton Street entrance to the cam- 
pus. Exhibitions of the institute have traveled to major museums in the United 
States and abroad. Visits to the campus by distinguished lecturers, art his- 
torians, and creative artists are sponsored by the institute. 

Educational and other services provided by the Institute for the Arts 
include: the art-to-schools program, a lecture series on art that is presented 
to school children by volunteer docents; the campus loan collection, art avail- 
able for exhibition in various campus facilities; the teaching collection, art 
available to faculty for teaching purposes. 



ART AND ART HISTORY 125 

A large portion of the institute's functions are open to the general public 
as well as the university community and are thus designed to enrich the cul- 
tural ambience not only of the campus but also of the city of which it is a part. 

History of Art and Architecture 

History of Art Courses 

205a, 206b. Introduction to the History of Art (3-0-3 each semester). 

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Paleolithic period to the twen- 
tieth century. Open to all students. Mr. Widrig, Mr. Camfield 

215a. History of the Film (3-0-3). 

The silent period. Emphasis on Griffith, Chaplin, Eisenstein, and the German Expression- 
ists. Classic films, approached theoretically and technically. Mr. McErilley 

216b. History of the Film (3-0-3). 

The sound period through the 1960s. The problem of assimilating sound and its effects. 
Primarily European, but some attention to Indian and Japanese films. Mr. McErilley 

225. Survey of Primitive Art (3-0-3). t 

African, oceanic, and North American Indian arts sampled. The style and function of art in 
preliterate societies discussed and history of Western appreciation considered. Also offered as 
Anthropology 225. 

235a. Art of Beginning Civilization (3-0-3). 

Comparative expression in visual arts and architecture from Neolithic origins to estab- 
lishment of empires in the ancient Near East (Egypt to Mesopotamia) and pre-Columbian 
America (Mexico to Peru). Also offered as Anthropology 235. Mr. Scott 

301a, 302b. Symbols in the Visual Arts (3-0-3 each semester). 

Paleolithic caves, neolithic temples, Eg>'pt. Mesopotamia, Crete, Greece, India, the Far 
East, Christianity, cabalism, alchemy, tarot. Numerical, geometrical and natural symbols. 
Diffusion patterns. Psychological and philosophical interpretations. Mr. McErilley 

303, 304. "World Mythology (3-0-3 each semester), t 

Primitive, Near-Eastern, Egj-ptian, and Greek myths. Spring semester: India, China, 
Japan. New World, Medieval, and Modern. Origin, diffusion, and development of myths; re- 
lation to religion, philosophy, literature, and psychoanalysis. 

305, 306. Greek Art and Archaeology (3-0-3 each semester), t 

The Bronze Age; tangible remains of Greek culture from its beginnings to the end of the 
Archaic period. Spring semester: development from Early Classical through Hellenistic pe- 
riods. 

308b. Roman Art and Archaeology (3-0-3). 

The painting, sculpture, and architecture of ancient Rome from roots in Etruscan art 
through the Republican and Imperial eras to the age of Constantine. Mr. Oliver-Smith 

309. Late Antique and Early Christian Art (3-0-3). t 

Transformation of Late Antique art and its adaptation to Christian content from the 
third to ninth centuries. Emphasis placed on establishment of the church form itself. 

310b. Byzantine Art (3-0-3). 

The architecture, painting, mosaic, and sculpture to the fall of Constantinople and their 
evolution from Eastern Early Christian art. Mr. Widrig 

312. Early Medieval and Romanesque Art (3-0-3). t 

Western European art and architecture from the fifth to twelfth centuries focusing on the 
evolving form of the Medieval church. 

319, 320. Gothic Art (3-0-3 each semester), t 

A survey of European architecture, sculpture, and painting, both religious and secular, 
from the mid-twelfth century to the early sixteenth century. 

325a. African Art (3-0-3). 

Traditional arts of sub-Saharan West Africa in the context of tribal cultures. Distribution 
of common forms and courtly arts. Also offered as Anthropology 325. Mr. Scott 



126 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

336. Oceanic Art (3-0-3). t 

Aboriginal arts of the Pacific Islanders in the context of their cultures. Diffusion of similar 
forms and Asiatic sources. Also offered as Anthropology 336. 

340. Expression of French Society Through Its Cinema (3-0-3). t 

The topic will change from year to year. Open to all students. Directed in English. 
French majors will have separate discussions in French. Also offered as French 340. 

345a. Renaissance and Baroque Architecture (3-0-3). 

Renaissance architecture considered as a conscious break with medieval modes, its sylistic 
and theoretical development, primarily in Italy during the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seven- 
teenth centuries. Mr. Widrig 

346b. Modern Architecture (3-0-3). 

The origins of modern architecture in rival modes of the eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 
turies; the new architecture of Richardson, Sullivan, Wright, and others; the International style 
and mid-twentieth-century trends. Mr. Widrig 

355a. American Art (3-0-3). 

A survey of American art from colonial period to 1940s. Emphasis on painting with some 
consideration of architecture, sculpture, and decorative or applied arts. Mr. Camfield 

356. American Art (3-0-3). t 

Continuation of History of Art 355. 

415a, 416b. Renaissance Art (3-0-3 each semester). 

A survey of European architecture, sculpture, and painting from the beginning of the fif- 
teenth century to the late sixteenth century. Mr.s\ Brown 

417, 418. Baroque and Rococo Art (3-0-3 each semester), f 

European architecture, sculpture, and painting from the late sixteenth to the late eight- 
eenth century. Continuation, criticism, and transformation of Renaissance form and space; 
discovery of new possibilities. 

425a. The Art of Venice (3-0-3). 

Venetian art and architecture traced from its Late Antique origins to its flowering in the 
sixteenth century and its subsequent reflorescence in the eighteenth century. Mr. Olirer-Smith 

438. Indian Art of North America (3-0-3). t 

Arts of historic and prehistoric Indian cultures of the United States and Canada; emphasis 
on Southwest, Northwest Coast, and the Alaskan Eskimo. Also offered as Anthropology 438. 

442b. Recent Trends in Architecture (3-0-3). 

Historic-critical presentation of modern architecture since World War II, examination of 
its maturity and transformation on a global scale. By permission of instructor. Also offered as 
Architecture 442. Mr. Papademetriou 

446b. Ancient Art of South America (3-0-3). 

Survey of the evolution of the arts in Andean civilizations from preceramic coastal com- 
munities to the Inca state. Includes northern South America, lower Central America, and An- 
tilles. Also offered as Anthropology 446. Mr. Scott 

447. Ancient Art of Mesoamerica (3-0-3). t 

The pre-Hispanic art of Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras, beginning with the Olmec cul- 
ture (c. 1200-600 B.C.) and culminating with that of the Aztec. Also offered as Anthropology 447. 

458b. Latin American Art (3-0-3). 

The art and architecture of Hispanic America after the European conquest, analyzing 
European and native contributions. Emphasis on Mexico with reference to Hispaniola, Peru, 
and Brazil. Mr. Scott 

461a. Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe (3-0-3). 

Major movements in painting and sculpture from late eighteenth century Neo-Classicism 
and Romanticism through Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. Brief consider- 
ation of architecture. Mr. Camfield 

463. Trends in Art Since 1945 (3-0-3). t 

Trends in American and European art. Abstract Expressionism to the present. Emphasis 
on American art and criticism. Prerequisite: History of Art 475 or permission of instructor. 



ART AND ART HISTORY 127 



475a. Twentieth-Century Art in Europe (3-0-3). 

The revolutionary movements of modern painting and sculpture from roots in Impression- 
ism through numerous"isms"of the twentieth century — Expressionism, Cubism, Abstraction, 
Dada, and Surrealism. Mr. Camfield 

491, 492, 493, 494, 495, 496. Special Topics. 

Advanced courses irregularly offered or special research and reading tailored to the in- 
dividual student. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Staff 

497a, 498b. Senior Thesis (1-0-1 first semester; 3-0-3 second semester). 

Thesis written under the direction of a member of the faculty. Limited to senior art majors. 
Permission of faculty required. Staff 

Studio Art 

Arts Courses 

101a. Design 1(1-6-3). 

Principles of two-dimensional design, including color theory. Strongly recommended for 
art majors; open to all students. Mr. O'Neil 

102b. Design I (1-6-3). 

Continued study of the elements and principles of design. Three-dimensional problems will 
be introduced. Prerequisite: Arts 101. Mr. Botetf 

225a,b; 226b. Drawing I (1-6-3 each semester). 

An introduction to the problems of drawing, using various media (pencil, charcoal, pen- 
and-ink). Open to all students. Staff 

325a,b. Life Drawing (1-6-3). 

Drawing from the model in various media. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Boterf Mr. Poidos 

401, 402. Design II (1-6-3 each semester).! 

Advanced design problems in two and three dimension. Prerequisite: Arts 102 or Archi- 
tecture 102. 

411a, 412b. Printmaking (1-6-3 each semester). 

Etching, lithography, and other printmaking methods, both in black and white and in 
color. Prerequisite: Arts 225, 226. Mr. Wirz 

425a, 426b. Painting I (1-6-3 each semester). 

Problems of painting, both traditional and experimental, in various opaque media. 
Open to all students. Prerequisite: Arts 225, 226 or permission of instructor. 

Mr. O'Neil, Mr. Wirz 

435a, 436b. Sculpture I (1-6-3 each semester). 

Sculpture in clay, ceramics, metal welding, and other sculptural media. Open to all stu- 
dents. Mr. Parnons 

449a, 450b, 451a, 452b, 453a, 454b. Special Problems (1-6-3 each 

semester). 

Advanced problems in creative art with individual instruction and criticism. Admission by 
permission of department chairman and instructional staff. May be repeated for credit. Staff 

465a, 466b. Sculpture II (1-6-3 each semester). 

Advanced problems in various media. Prerequisite: Arts 435, 436. Mr. Parsons 

475a, 476b. Painting II (1-6-3 each semester). 

Advanced problems in painting. Individual projects. Prerequisite: Arts 425. 426. 

Mr. Poulos 

501a, 502b. Independent Study (1-6-3 each semester). 

Individual work in the studio arts, film, or photography under the direction of one or more 
staff members. Restricted to B.F.A. degree candidates. Staff 

503a, 504b. Independent Study (2-12-6 each semester). 

The same as Arts 501, 502 with increased credit hours. Staff 



128 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

505a, 506b. Independent Study (3-18-9 each semester). 

The same as Arts 501, 502 with increased credit hours. Staff 

507a, 508b. Independent Study (4-24-12 each semester). 

The same as Arts 501, 502 with increased credit hours. Staff 

Film and Photography 

Arts Courses 

205a, 206b. Photography I (3-3-3 each semester). 

Exploration of the basic materials and processes of the photographic medium; viewing, 
analysis, and discussion of the medium's history and current trends. Mr. Winningham 

305a, 306b. Photography II (3-3-3 each semester). 

Advanced problems in photography. Emphasis on independent pursuit of projects submit- 
ted by students. Staff, Mr. Winningham 

327a,b; 328a,b. Film and Videotape Making I (3-0-3 each semester). 

A study of the expressive possibilities of the mediums. Synchronous sound, using super- 
eight millimeter film. Also offered as Sociology 327, 328 and Anthropology 327, 328. 

329a, 330b. Film Form I (3-0-3 each semester). 

Viewing, analysis, and discussion of modern and classic films. Also offered as English 
329, 330. •^'"- Huberman 

345a, 346b. Alternative Problems in Photography I, II (3-0-3 each 

semester). Staff 

405. Contemporary Trends in Photography (3-0-3).t 

Seminar: Survey of contemporary trends in photography. 

427a, 428b. Film and Videotape Making II (3-0-3 each semester). 

One major film project by each student. Production planning and use of professional tech- 
niques, employing sixteen millimeter film and synchronous sound. Prerequisite: Arts 327, 328. 

Mr. Huberman 

429a, 430b. Film Form II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Viewing, analysis and discussion of films. More academic course with assigned reading and 
reports. Mr. Huberman 

431. New American Independent Avant Garde Cinema (3-0-3). t 

A historical and analytical study of the efforts and ideas shaping the development of the 
new American Independent Avant Garde Cinema, sometimes known as the Underground. 

432b. Film Genre: The Western (3-0-3). 

The essential American film experience spaning all the years of U.S. cinema. Focusing on 
the Western, the course concerns itself with questions regarding what creates a genre. 

Mr. Huberman 

449a, 450b, 451a, 452b, 453a, 454b. Special Problems (1-6-3 each 
semester). 
See Studio Art section for description. Staff 

455. Computer Graphics and Animation Seminar (1-6-3). t 

Study of the relationships between the art of design and the methods of science, through 
algorithmic, mathematical, and logical languages usually associated with digitial computers. 

501a-508b. Independent Study. 

See Studio Art section for description. Staff 

Theater 

The Rice Players is an extracurricular group that presents a wide range 
of theatrical performances. In recent years these have included classics such 
as Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing and the Alchemist by Ben Jonson, 



ART AND ART HISTORY 129 

as well as modern experimental shows such as The Serpent of Jea.n Claude van 
Italie and Charles Marowitz's A Macbeth. The Players have presented their 
own adaptation of Alice in Wonderland and the musicals Zorba and The Can- 
terbury Talei<. Participation is open to any Rice student or faculty member. 

Theater Course 

300a,b. Introduction to Theater (3-0-3 each semester). 

Analysis and interpretation of plays from the viewpoints of the theater artists: director, 
actor, and designer. Techniques of theater production. Mr. Harens 

Behavioral Science 



Degree.^ Offered: B.A. (interdisciplinary degree), M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The major in behavioral science centers on 
a nucleus of courses in anthropology, psychology, and sociology. The student 
will ordinarily, but not necessarily, emphasize one of these three fields. 

Students majoring in behavioral science will be required to take a mini- 
mum of thirty semester hours (ten semester courses) in anthropology, psychol- 
ogy, and sociology, of which twenty-four semester hours (eight courses) must 
be courses numbered 300 or higher. A minimum of six semester hours (two 
courses) in each of the three fields of anthropology, psychology, and sociology is 
required. With the approval of the major adviser, a maximum of six semester 
hours (two courses) in courses numbered 300 or higher in related fields outside 
the core fields may be included in the major. Six semester hours (two courses) 
at the 200 level may be substituted for advanced-level courses if they are in a 
field of the major in which no courses have been taken previously. Students are 
encouraged to plan in consultation with the program adviser an independent 
study course (to be taken in the fall of their senior year) that will integrate the 
varying perspectives of anthropology, psychology, and sociology. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 90 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 
and 51. 

Graduate Program. The departments of Anthropology and Sociology 
offer an interdisciplinary graduate program in behavioral science leading 
to the doctorate with specialization in either anthropology or sociology. A 
qualifying examination in either sociology or anthropology must be taken 
at the end of the first year and must be passed not later than the end of 
second year. Comprehensive examinations in either anthropology or sociol- 
ogy must be passed before the student is admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D and undertakes work on the doctoral dissertation. Many courses 
given in anthropology and sociology, as well as those bearing the title be- 
havorial science, may be taken by students specializing in either field. The 
program of each student is individually planned to take advantage of in- 
terdisciplinary training. There is no foreign language requirement for ma- 
jors in sociology; competence in one foreign language is usually required of 
majors in anthropology. 

An important part of the student's training is participation in research 
and teaching. Each student will have an individual adviser and will ordinarily 
participate in research programs and teaching. Upon completion of the com- 
prehensive examinations and approval of candidacy for the Ph.D., the M.A. is 



130 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

optionally offered, but no students who intend to complete only the M.A. are 
admitted to the program. The M.A. as a terminal degree will be awarded only 
in unusual cases. In such cases, the M.A. will require satisfactory completion of 
thirty semester hours of course work approved by an adviser, a passing grade 
on the qualifying examination in the candidate's field of concentration, and a 
thesis. 

Additional information may be obtained from the departments of An- 
thropology and Sociology. 

Behavioral Science Courses 

500. Basic Trends in Sociological Theory (3-0-3). t 

Classical theories of Durkheim and Weber and their contribution to contemporary socio- 
logical perspective. Examination of current sociological theory: conflict theory, exchange 
theory, social behaviorism, and microsociology. Also offered as Sociology 315. 

505a,b. Independent Study and Tutorial (0-0-3 to 9 each semester). Staff 

510. Current Topics and Problems in Anthropology (3-0-3). f 

515a. Ethnological Theory (3-0-3). 

Seminar surveying major trends of ethnological theory from the beginning of anthro- 
pologj'. Also offered as Anthropolog>' 400. Mr. Norbecic 

546b. Linguistic Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Linguistic theory and method in the analysis of cultural materials. Also offered as 
Anthropology 508 and Linguistics 412. Mr. Tyler 

550. Ethnography of Urban Places (3-0-3). t 

A seminar that will provide students an opportunity to plan and conduct ethnographic 
studies in the Houston area. Also offered as Anthropology 450. 

597a, 598b; 697a, 698b. Research and Thesis in Behavioral Science (0-0-3 
to 9 each semester). 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



Biochemistry 



Professor Schroepfer, Chairman; Professors Awapara, Palmer, and 

J. B. Walker 

Associate Professors Matthews, Olson, Quiocho, and Rudolph 

Assistant Professor Bennett 

Lecturer R. H. White 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Undergraduate biochemistry majors must 
complete the following courses: 

Freshman level: Mathematics 101, 102 or 121, 122; Chemistry 101, 102, 107; 

Physics 101, 102 or 111, 112; Physics 132. 
Sophomore level: Mathematics 211, 212; Chemistry 211, 212; Chemistry 213, 

214; and any advanced physics or mathematics course or Mathematical 

Sciences 220 or 223 or Engineering 240. 
Advanced level: Biochemistry 361, 365, and 367; Chemistry 311, 312; at least 

nine semester hours (three courses) at the advanced level in biochemistry, 

biology, or chemistry in addition to those specified. 

An undergraduate major in biochemistry must have forty-two semester 



BIOCHEMISTRY 131 

hours (fourteen courses) in courses numbered 300 or higher to obtain a Bach- 
elor of Arts degree. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semes- 
ter hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of at least 
129 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 and 51. 

Undergraduate majors in biochemistry are encouraged but not required 
to pursue independent supervised research in Biochemistry 401. Concurrent 
registration in Biochemistry 411 is required. In addition, undergraduate ma- 
jors in biochemistry are strongly encouraged, but not required, to enroll in 
Chemistry 401, Chemistry 402, and Biochemistry 460. Undergraduates 
wishing to enroll in graduate courses in biochemistry normally require 
permission of the instructor. 

Graduate Program. Graduate study in biochemistry leading to the 
M.A. or Ph. D. degrees is open to qualified students holding a bachelor's de- 
gree or the equivalent. Admission to the graduate program is based on pre- 
vious academic performance, recommendations, and performance on the 
Graduate Record Examination. Entering students are expected have very 
strong backgrounds in one or more of the following: chemistry, biochemistry, 
or biology. Candidates for advanced degrees must meet the general university 
requirements (see pages 91-92) and specific departmental requirements de- 
termined in consultation with an adviser. For further information, interested 
applicants should contact the departmental chairman. 

Biochem istry Coursei< 

101a. Nutritional Biochemistry for Nonscience Majors (3-0-3). 

Biochemical concepts underlying the science of nutrition and related subjects: food com- 
position, calories and energj' needs, needs for special nutrients, nutritional deficiencies, current 
nutritional topics. No previous chemistry courses required. Mr. Auripara 

200c, 201a, 202b. Special Topics in Biochemistry for Undergraduates 

(O-TBA-2 each semester). 

Independent program of study and research under direction of faculty member. Requires 
permisson of supervising faculty member and of the departmental chairman. Staff 

361a. General Biochemistry (6-0-6). 

The chemistry, biological functions, and metabolism of molecules in living cells. Topics 
include enzymic catalysis, metabolic control, and energ>' production and utilization. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 211. 212. " Mr. Palmer. Mr. Rudolph 

365a,b. Experimental Biochemistry (Lecture) (3-0-3). 

A lecture course on modern techniques of biochemical invesitgation. Prerequisite: Bio- 
chemistry 361. Staff 

367a,b. Experimental Biochemistry (Laboratory) (0-9-3). 

Modern techniques of biochemical investigation: chemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, 
nucleic acids; separation techniques; spectroscopy; measurement and safe-handling of radio- 
isotopes; enzyme purification and methods of kinetic analysis. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
Biochemistry 365. Staff 

400c, 401a, 402b. Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry (0-15-5 each 

semester). 

Open only to undergraduate majors with the permission of the research supervisor and the 
chairman. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361, 365, and 367, and enrollment in Biochemistry 411. 

Staff 

410e. Undergraduate Research Seminar in Biochemistry (3-0-3). Staff 

411a, 412b. Undergraduate Research Seminar in Biochemistry (3-0-3 

each semester). 

Discussion of current research in area under investigation. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
Biochemistry 401. Staff 



132 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

460b. Advanced Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

The structure and metabolism of macromoleeules, advanced intermediary metabolism, 
reaction mechanisms, regulation (including hormonal control of metabolism), and enzyme 
kinetics. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361. Staff 

501a. General Biochemistry for Graduate Students (6-0-6). 

Chemical nature of molecules in living cells and their biological functions: biosynthesis and 
degradation: mechanisms and stereochemistry of enzymic catalysis; metabolic control, energy 
production, and utilization. Prerequisite: graduate status, one year of organic chemistry. 

Mr. Palmer. Mr. Rudolph 

515a, 516b. Experimental Biochemistry (Lecture) (3-0-3 each semester). 

An intensive lecture course dealing with modern techniques of biochemical investigation. 
Prerequisite: graduate status and completion of enrollment in Biochemistry 501 or equivalent. 

Staff 

517a, 518b. Experimental Biochemistry (Laboratory) (0-9-3 each 

semester). 

Modern techniques of biochemical investigation: chemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, nu- 
cleic acids: separation techniques; spectroscopy: measurement and safe-handling of radioiso- 
topes: enzyme purification and methods of kinetic analysis. Prerequisite: graduate status and 
enrollment in Biochemistry 515 or equivalent. Staff 

560b. Advanced Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

Same as Biochemistry 460. Prerequisite: 361 or equivalent and graduate status. Staff 

566b. Advanced Experimental Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

The biochemical application of spectroscopic (including ORD-CD, ESR, NMR, and mass 
spectroscopy) and other physical approaches (including ultracentrifugation and x-ray crystal- 
lography). Staff 

568b. Advanced Experimental Biochemistry (Laboratory) (0-9-3). Staff 

571a, 572b. Special Topics in Biochemistry (3-0-3 each semester). 
Subject to be announced. 

575a. Introduction to Research (0-3-1). 

A rotation of first-year graduate students through the research laboratories of individual 
faculty members. Staff 

581a, 582b. Graduate Seminar in Biochemistry (2-0-2). 

A discussion of selected biochemical topics. Mr. Schroepfer 

601a, 602b. Graduate Research in Biochemistry (Credit Variable). 

611a, 612b. Biochemistry Research Seminar (3-0-3). 

Discussion of current research in area under investigation. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
Biochemistry 601. 

621a, 622b. Biochemistry Department Thesis Seminar (1-0-1 each 
semester). 



Biology 



Professor F. M. Fisher, Chairman; Professors Campbell, Philpott, Sass, 
Storck, Subtelny, and C. H. Ward 
Associate Professors Ansevin, Glantz, Harcombe, and Stewart 

Degrees Offered: B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Biology majors are required to take eight 
semester hours of introductory biology (Biology 101, 102 and 103, 104), seven 
semester hours of introductory physics (Physics 101, 102 and 132 or 111, 112 



BIOLOGY 133 

and 132 or Physics 121, 122 and 123 or 124), six semester hours of introductory 
mathematics (Mathematics 101, 102 or 103, 106), eight semester hours of in- 
troductory chemistry (Chemistry 101, 102 and 103, 104), eight semester hours 
of organic chemistry (Chemistry 211, 212 and 213, 214), six semester hours of 
general biochemistry (Biochemistry 361), twenty-one semester hours of ad- 
vanced biology electives, and four semester hours of advanced biology labor- 
atory. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 128 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 
and 51. 

Undergraduate Alternative Programs. Up to six semester hours of the 
required advanced biology electives may be satisfied as follows: three semes- 
ter hours in either Biology 401 (402), 403 or a 500-level biology course and 
three semester hours in either Biochemistry 460 or Biochemistry 365. An ad- 
ditional semester of Biology 401 (402) may be substituted for one semester hour 
advanced laboratory credit; Biochemistry 367 may also be substituted for an 
additional one semester hour advanced laboratory credit. With the exception of 
Biochemistry 365, 367, and 460, all courses taken outside the Biology 
Department must be approved by the department for credit toward the major. 

Undergraduate Double Major. Double majors including biology must 
comply with the above requirements for a major except that only fifteen 
semester hours of advanced biology electives are required. Three semester 
hours may be satisfied as described in the above paragraph on undergraduate 
alternative programs. Double majors are also required to take four semester 
hours of advanced biology laboratories (300-level and above). 

Major Following Early Admission to Medical School. A major in biol- 
ogy will normally be approved for students entering medical school at the end 
of their junior year provided they have satisfied the requirements for the 
double major described above. These requirements may be completed follow- 
ing matriculation in medical school only by enrollment in courses offered by 
the department. They may not be satisfied by transfer credit for preclinical 
courses taken in medical school. 

Graduate Program. The graduate program is open to qualified appli- 
cants who hold a bachelor's degree or equivalent. Prospective graduate stu- 
dents must take the Graduate Record Examination, preferably including the 
advanced examination in biology. The entering graduate student generally is 
expected to have a strong background in one of the several areas of biology; in 
addition, completion of courses in physics (one year), mathematics (including 
calculus), and chemistry (including organic) is required. The above require- 
ments do not preclude admission of qualified applicants who have majored in 
areas other than biology. Any deficiencies must be made up no later than the 
first year of residence in graduate study, including the first summer. It is 
strongly recommended that deficiencies be made up during the summer 
preceding the first semester of residence. A preliminary examination will be 
administered during the first year. Students entering with the master's degree 
are normally exempt from this examination. 

Program for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. In addition to the 
general university requirements for advanced degrees (pages 91-92), the follow- 
ing departmental requirements must also be met: 

1. Three or more years of graduate study with at least two years in residence 
at Rice 



134 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

2. An original investigation worthy of publication in a scientific journal, and a 
doctoral thesis as described in the General Announcementi< 

3. A grade average of 2 or better in courses taken in the department and satis- 
factory grades in courses taken outside the department 

4. Satisfactory performance in Biology 503 for at least four smesters 

5. Satisfactory preformance on a candidacy examination administered by the 
advisory committee; this examination may be oral and/or written 

6. Public defense of the thesis 

7. Presentation of a departmental seminar on the candidate's research 

Program for the Degree of Master of Arts. The degree of Master of 
Arts may be obtained after the completion of thirty semester hours of grad- 
uate study, six hours of which must be earned by the completion and public 
defense of a thesis embodying the results of an original investigation. 

Assistantships. A limited number of graduate fellowships are available 
on a competitive basis. All graduate students in biology are expected to engage 
in laboratory instruction for at least two years, regardless of appointment. 



Biology Courf^es 

101a. Introduction to Biology (3-0-3). 

A study of the basic principles of biology through analysis of form and function in animals. 

Mr. Fisher 

102b. Introduction to Biology (3-0-3). 

Molecular and cellular biology, genetics, and developmental biology. Background prepara- 
tion in the physical sciences recommended. Mr. Sass, Mr. Stewart, and Mr. Suhtelny 

103a. Laboratory in General Biology (0-3-1). 

Experimental approaches in the functional morphology of animals. Staff 

104b. Laboratory in General Biology (0-3-1). 

Experiments in molecular and cellular biology, genetics, and developmental biology. Staff 

320b. General Physiology (3-0-3). 

Role of the plasma membrane in cell function. Emphasis on the physiology of nerve 
and muscle cells. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102; Introductory Physics. Mr. Glantz 

322b. Laboratory for General Physiology (0-3-1). 

Limited to 20 students. Mr. Glantz 

326a. Comparative Physiology (3-0-3). 

A general review of homeostatic mechanisms operating in the adaptation of animals to 
different environments. Prerequisite: Biology 101. 102. Mr. Campbell 

331a. Developmental Biology (3-0-3). 

An analysis of processes and principles in development of organisms with emphasis on 
experimental embryology. Mr. Suhtehiy 

341a. Ecosystem Biology (3-0-3). 

Analysis of species interactions, plant and animal community organization, and eco- 
system function. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 103. Mr. Harcomhe 

343a. Laboratory in Ecosystem Biology (0-3-1). 

Field studies of natural ecosystems. Saturday field trips required. Corequistie: Biology 
341. Mr. Harcombe 

350b. Plant Biology (3-0-3). 

Analysis of the physiology, morphology, and evolution of plants in terms of adaption to 
environment. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 103. Mr. Ward. Mr. Harcombe 

352b. Laboratory in Plant Biology (0-3-1). 

Field and laboratory studies of plant adaptation to environment. Corequisite: Biology 350 
or consent of instructor. Limited to 32 students. Mr. Ward. Mr. Harcombe 



BIOLOGY 135 

360b. Genetics (3-0-4). 

An analysis of the structure, function, and transmission of the genetic material. It is recom- 
mended, but not required, that Biology 103, 104 and Biochemistry 361 be taken first. 

Mr. Stcivart 

362b. Genetics Laboratory (0-3-1). '' 

Corequisite: Biolog:>' 360 or consent of instructor. Mr. Steicart 

401a,b; 402c. Undergraduate Honors Research (2-6-4 each semester). 

Normally limited to senior biology majors with superior academic records. Permission of 
supervising professor and chairman required. Written thesis may be required. Stdff 

403a,b. Special Topics in Biology (Credit variable). 

Used for transfer credit and other special circumstances. Permission of departmental 
undergraduate affairs committee required. Staff 

405a, b. Undergraduate Research Seminar in Biology (Credit variable). 

A discussion of contemporary research areas in the biological sciences. Recommended for 
those students participating in departmental research projects. Staff 

411. Parasitism and Symbiosis (3-3-4). f 

An introduction to the biolog>' of symbiosis; special emphasis on parasitism and on the 
physical and chemical relationships between organisms. Mr. Fisher 

419. Biological Oceanography (4-3-1). t 

Study of the biological aspects of oceanography, emphaizing planktonic organisms. Nek- 
tonic and benthonic organisms will also be considered, as will be paleoceanography. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. Mr. Casey, Mr. Fisher 

420. Neurobiology (3-0-3).t 

Mechanism involved in the development, maintenance, and functioning of nervous 
systems of simple and complex organisms. Prerequisite; Biology 320 and/or consent of instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 

421a,b. Biophysical Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Physical chemistry applied to problems in the biological sciences: solutions of macromole- 
cules, ionic processes, interfacial phenomena, transport systems, and molecular 
models of biochemical and physiological processes. Prerequisite: Biology 103, 104; 
Chemistry 101, 102; Mathematics 211, 212 or consent of instructor. Mr. Sass 

424b. Comparative Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

Diversity in biochemistry with emphasis on animal metabolism; the oigin of life and es- 
tablishment of biochemical unity; molecular mechanisms operating in evolution. 

Mr. Campbell 

430b. Cellular and Molecular Aspects of Development (3-0-3). 

Mechanisms of information transfer and their controls in development. Analysis of de- 
termination and differentiation of cell phenotypes. Prerequisite: Biology 331 and Bio- 
chemistry 361. M.S'. Anserin 

482b. Laboratory for Development Biology (0-6-2). 

Observation and experiments on amphibian and avian embryos. Enrollment limited to 16 
students. Prerequisite: Biology 331 or registration in 430 and consent of instructor. 

Ms. Auseriii 

471a. Microbiology (3-0-3). 

Anatomy, physiology and molecular biology of microbial procaryotes and eucaryotes and of 
viruses. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361 or consent of instructor. Mr. Storck 

473a. Laboratory in Microbiology (0-3-1). 

Methods of isolation, identification and numeration of bacteria. Corequisite: Biology 471. 
Enrollment limited to 24 students. Mr. Storck 

481a. Cells and Tissues (3-0-3). 

The morphology and function of cell components, cells and tissues as revealed by light 
and electron microscope and associated histo- and cytochemical methods. Prerequisite: 
Biology 320 and Biochemistry 361. Mr. Philpott 



136 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

483a. Cells and Tissues Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Laboratory work in histology and histochemistry and other selected methods for studying 
cells and tissue. Mr. Phil pott 

501a, b. Seminar in Biology (1-0-1). 

General departmental seminar. Required of all graduate students. Staff 

503a,b. Teaching in Biology (Credit variable). 

Supervised instruction in teaching in the various areas of biology. Prerequisite: graduate 
standing in biology. Staff 

511. Physiology of Parasitism (3-0-3). t 

Conferences and student reports on the physiology of parasites and the functional rela- 
tionships of hosts and parasites; growth, metabolism, nutrition, and physiological evolution of 
parasites. Prerequisite: Biologj* 411 or equivalent. Mr. Fixher 

521. Advanced Cell Physiology (3-0-3).t 

Seminar on selected research areas in cell structure and function. Prerequiste: Graduate 
standing and Biochemistry 361 or equivalent. Mr. Campbell 

523a. Advanced Comparative Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

A seiminar on current literature on comparative animal biochemistry. Prerequisite: grad- 
uate standing and Biochemistry 361 or equivalent. Mr. Campbell 

525a. Concepts of Nervous Systems Functions (3-0-3). 

Vertebrate and comparative neurophysiology. Prerequisite: Biology 320 or equivalent and 
consent of instructor. Understanding of cell physiology is assumed. Limited to 15 students. 

Mr. Glantz 

532b. Cell and Tissue Interactions in Development (3-0-3). 

Seminar course surveying recent literature on the subject. Prerequiste: Biochemistry 361, 
Biology 331 and 430. Ms-. Am^erin 

533a,b. Special Projects in Developmental Biology (0-6-2). 

Laboratory training in e.xperimental manipulations on developing eggs and embryos; 
individual research projects. M.s. An.'<erin, Mr. Subtelny 

534. Advanced Developmental Biology (3-0-3). f 

Informal seminars on recent advances in porblems of embryonic development. Prerequi- 
site: Biology 331 and 430. Mr. Subtelny 

543. Marshland and Estuarine Biology (1-6-3). t 

Student reports, conferences, and field work on the physical composition and the biota of 
nearby coastal environments. Mr. Fi.ther 

547a,b. Topics in Ecosystem Biology (3-0-3). 

Discussions, seminars, and projects concerning organization, structure, and function of 
ecosystems. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mr. Harcombe 

553a,b. Topics in Plant Biology (3-0-3). 

A seminar on current literature and research in plant biology. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. Mr. Ward 

569a,b. Topics in Microbial Genetics (3-0-3). 

Student seminars analyzing recent research on a subject of current interest in microbial 
genetics and molecular biology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mr. Stewart 

571a,b. Topics in Microbiology (3-0-3). 

Discussion of research literature. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mr. Storck 

580b. Cell Biology (2-6-4). 

The study of cells and cell phenomena and interpretation of observations. Advanced labor- 
atory and seminar. Prerequisite: Biology 320, 481, 483, and Biochemistry 361. Mr. Philpott 

582b. Topics in Cell Biology (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Biology 481 or permission of instructor. Mr. Philpott 

601a,b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

Independent research open to first year graduate students. Staff 



BIOLOGY 137 

701a,b. Thesis Research (Credit variable). Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



Chemistry 



Professor Wenkert, Chairman; Professors Brooks, Curl, 

Haekerman, Hayes, Kilpatriek, Lewis, 

Margrave, Sass, Schroepfer, and Wall 

Associate Professors Billups, Engel, Glass, Parry, and L. J. Wilson 

Assistant Professors Fukuyama, Mukamel, Smalley, and Sosinsky 

Degree.'^ Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Undergraduates electing chemistry as a 
major are expected to take the following courses in their freshman year: 
Mathematics 101, 102 (or equivalent honors courses); Physics 101, 102, 132; 
Chemistry 101. 102, 107. In general they will take Chemistry 211, 212 and 
213, 214; Physics 201, 202; and Mathematics 211, 212 in the sophomore year. 
The department further requires satisfactory completion of the following 
courses: 

Junior and Senior Years 

Chemistry 311, 312 and 313, 314 

Chemistry 401 and 403 

Chemistry 430 

Chemistry 460 or 495 

Two additional courses in advanced chemistry, physics, mathematics, 
mathematical sciences, or biochemistry. Superior students may substitute 
undergraduate research (Chemistry 491, 492) for one or two semesters of 
classroom instruction. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 133 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 
and 51. 

American Chemical Society Certification. The Rice chemistry depart- 
ment is on the approved list of the Committee on Professional Training of the 
American Chemical Society and as such can certify that graduates have met 
the appropriate standards. For certification, two additional advanced courses 
are required and a foreign language, preferably German, is recommended. 

Accelerated Ph.D. Plan. Because of the high level of training provided 
in the Rice B.A. program, it is possible for certain especially qualified under- 
graduate students to be admitted to an accelerated program that will norm- 
ally lead to the Ph.D. degree about two years after completion of the B.A. pro- 
gram. In order to complete the work in this time, the student will initiate re- 
search during the summer following the junior year and will continue re- 
search by taking Chemistry 491, 492 during the senior year. The student may 
start taking cumulative examinations during the senior year and should be 
able to complete all courses and examinations before the end of the second year 
after the B.A. The student should in most cases, if not all, be able to complete 
the thesis in this time as well. 



138 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Interdepartmental Majors. Interdepartmental majors are offered in 
chemical physics and materials science by the Department of Chemistry in 
conjunction with the Departments of Physics and Materials Science, respec- 
tively. Students electing one of these majors should discuss their programs 
with both the Department of Chemistry and the other department con- 
cerned. 

The Graduate Program. Students who have completed work equivalent 
to that required for the bachelor's degree in chemistry offered at Rice Univer- 
sity may be admitted to graduate standing. Preference is normally given to 
applicants who earn high scores on the Graduate Record Examination, includ- 
ing the advanced test in chemistry (see pages 96 and 97). A minimum of one 
year of graduate study is required for the degree of Master of Arts and at least 
two years for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. A nominal amount of under- 
graduate teaching is normally considered an integral part of the graduate pro- 
gram. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts are required to demonstrate a 
reading knowledge of scientific German, French, or Russian; complete six 
one-semester courses; present in a thesis the results of a program of research 
approved by the department; and pass a final oral examination. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must complete for 
publication a thesis which represents a distinctly original and significant con- 
tribution to the field of chemistry. They must possess a reading knowledge of 
two modern languages, besides English, in which there is a significant body of 
chemical literature, usually German, French, or Russian. Candidates must 
further have acquired through course work and independent study a broad 
fundamental knowledge of chemistry in addition to those areas of the subject 
encompassed by their own research interests. Cumulative examinations for the 
Ph.D. degree are given periodically and a final oral examination on the thesis 
is required for all candidates. 



Chemistry Courses 

101a, 102b. Introductory and Analytical Chemistry (3-0-3 each semester). 

The basic phenomena and principles of chemistry. Normally taken with Chemistry 107; the 
three courses (or equivalent) are prerequisite to advanced courses in chemistry. Prerequisite: 
high school chemistry. Mr. Kilpatrick 

106b. Honors Laboratory (0-4-1). 

Independent projects in synthesis and characterization of compounds; experiments related 
to environmental chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. 107, and permission of instructor. 

Mr. So.^in.^k-n. Mr. Wihon 

107a,b. Introductory and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (1-4-2). 

Volumetric and gravimetric methods of quantitative analysis; fundamentals and methods 
of qualitative analysis. Normally taken with Chemistry 101, 102; the three courses (or equiva- 
lent) are prerequisite for advanced courses in chemistry. Mr. Brooks, Mr. Curl 

211a, 212b. Organic Chemistry (3-0-3 each semester). 

Aliphatic and aromatic organic chemistry with emphasis on structure, bonding, and re- 
action mechanisms. Second semester, greater emphasis on the chemistry of various functional 
groups. Normally accompanied by Chemistry 213, 214. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, 102. 

Mr. BillHp.^ 

213a, 214b. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (0-4-1 each semester). 

Synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Experiments related 
to topics covered in Chemistry 211, 212. Second semester includes identification of unknown 
organic compounds. Corequisite or prerequisite: Chemistry 107 and 211, 212. Staff 



CHEMISTRY 139 

311a, 312b. Physical Chemistry (3-0-3 each semester). 

The principles of thermodynamics including topics of equilibria, theory of solutions, and 
electrochemistry. Second semester, kinetic theory of gases, kinetics, transport properties, 
photochemistry, the solid and liquid states, surfaces, and polymers. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
211. 212; Physics 101, 102 (Physics 201, 202 or 211. 212 recommended): Chemistry 101, 102. 

Mr. /?/-ooA-.s-, Mr. Glass 

313a. Experimental Physical Chemistry (1-4-2). 

Experiments illustrating techniques employed in high vacuum, optical spectroscopy, 
calorimetry. electrochemistry, and surface area measurements. Mr. Smallei/ 

314b. Advanced Instrumental Laboratory (0-8-2). 

Principles and application of modern instrumental methods to inorganic and physical 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311 and 313. Mr. S>nalleij 

401a. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

The course develops, in detail, the concepts of modern organic chemistry. A major portion is 
devoted to reactions of synthetic importance. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211, 212. Mr. Engel 

403a. Advanced Organic Laboratory (1-8-2). 

Covers the techniques of modern organic chemistry. Designed to accompany Chemistry 
401. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211, 212. Mr. Fukuyama. Mr. Lewis 

411a. Spectral Methods in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Elucidation of organic structures by physical techniques. Interpretation of infrared, ultra- 
violet, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectra. Prerequisite: Chemistry 401. Staff 

415a. Chemical Kinetics (3-0-3). 

Measurement of reaction rates, phenomenological and theoretical treatment of kinetics of 
simple and chain reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311, 312. Mr. Glass 

420b. Statistical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A development of the equilibrium theory of statistical mechanics. Applications to imper- 
fect gas theory and the calculation of thermodynamic properties of molecules. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 311, 312, 430; Mathematics 211, 303; Physics 201, 202 or 211, 212. Mr. Wall 

421a, 422b. Biophysical Chemistry (3-0-3 each semester). 

Physical chemical principles applied to current problems in life sciences. Macromolecules, 
ionic processes, interfacial phenomena, transport systems, and molecular models of biochemi- 
cal and physiological processes. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102; Chemistry 101, 102; Mathe- 
matics 211. 212. Mr. Sass 

430a. Quantum Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Quantum mechanics, atomic structure, the nature of the chemical bond, and statistical 
mechanics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211, 212 and 303; Physics 101, 102 and 201, 202 or 211, 
212; Chemistry 311. Mr. Smalley 

445b. Physical-Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Organic reaction mechanisms: substituent and medium effects, linear free energy rela- 
tions, and acidity functions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311, 312 and 401. Mr. Engel 

460b. Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Atomic and molecular structures; bonding in eovalent, ionic, and electron deficient 
systems; thermochemical principles and experimental techniques for analysis, structure 
determination, and synthesis. Mr. Margrave 

471b. Molecular Spectroscopy (3-0-3). 

The spectra of simple molecules, including microwave, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, and 
Raman spectra; introductory aspects of molecular symmetry and group theory: resonance 
spectroscopy. Mr. Curl 

491a, 492b, 493c. Special Study and Research for Undergraduates 

(Credit variable). 
Open only to chemistry majors with superior records and with the permission of the chair- 
man. Written thesis required. Staff 

495a. Transition Metal Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Mechanisms of inorganic reactions, group theory applications to chemistry, ligand field 
theory, and coordination chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311, 312. Mr. Wilson 



140 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

501a, 502b; 503a, 504b; 505a, 506b; 507a, 508b. Graduate Research 

(Credit variable). Staff 

516. Advanced Chemical Kinetics (3-0-3).t 

Molecular beams, unimolecular rate theory, flames and explosions, catalysis; surface 
reactions, electrode and electrode reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 415. 

521a. Chemical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

An intensive review of thermodynamics designed primarily for first-year graduate 
students. Mr. Wall 

531. Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry (3-0-3).t 

Instrumentation, ionization cross-sections and efficiency curves, Franck-Condon prin- 
ciple, ionization potentials, appearance potentials and heats of formation, simple mass spectra, 
fragmentation mechanisms, and quasi-equilibrium theory. 

541, 543, 545, 546. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3 each 

semester). t 

542a. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Chemistry and mechanisms of reactions of organic compounds containing nonmetallic 
elements in addition to carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and amine nitrogen. Mr. Lewis 

544. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3).t 

Photophysics of organic molecules and their light-induced chemical reactions. 

552. Reaction Kinetics and Mechanisms in Solutions (3-0-3). t 

A consideration of the rates of reactions with emphasis on homogeneous kinetics as a tool in 
the study of reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: Chemistry 445. 

561a, 562b. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3 each semester). 

Organic reaction mechanisms, modern structure theory, and synthetically important 
reactions: designed primarily for first-year graduate students. Mr. Engel, Mr. Fukuyama 

581, 582, 583, 584. The Chemistry of Organic Natural Products (3-0-3 

each semester).! 
590, 591. Advanced Topics in Physical and Theoretical Chemistry (3-0-3 

each semester).t 
592. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (3-0-3).t 

595. Special Topics in Organometalic Chemistry (3-0-3).t 

Topics in homogenous catalysis with particular emphasis on the role of ion specificity in 
synthesis. 

596. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3).t 

Physical techniques used in modern transition metal chemistry, including magneto- 
chemistry, electrochemistry and esr, pmr, photoelectron and Mossbauer spectroscopy. 

597. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3).t 

Synthetic and theoretical approaches to new areas of inorganic chemistry, e.g., fluorine 
chemistry, baron chemistry, radiochemistry. 

605, 606. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3 each semester).! 

Advanced survey of descriptive inorganic chemistry. Self-study reading course by per- 
mission of the instructor. 

611a. High Temperature and High Pressure Chemistry (3-0-3). 

The techniques for generation and measurement of high temperatures and high pressures 
and of the nature of phenomena under extreme conditions. Mr. Margrave 

651a. Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3). 

A development of the elements and techniques of quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 211, 303. Mr. Mukamel 

652b. Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Application of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular systems. Mr. Mukamel 

660. X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis (3-0-3).t 

A course in X-ray analysis, including experimental methods, symmetry and space groups. 



CHEMISTRY 141 



700c. Summer Graduate Research. ;: , ' '> xV , , ■ .^ Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. ; jjV .: ■ staff 



Economics 



Professor Rimlinger, Chairman; Professors Besen. Huddle, Krzyzaniak, 
McLure, Soligo, and Young 
Adjunct Professor Mieszkowski 
Associate Professors G. W. Smith and K. J. White ' 

Assistant Professors Butler, Kelly, Pomery, and Wright '■^' ' 
Visiting Assistant Professor McCaleb 
Adjunct Assistant Professors Lairson and Swint <;T 

■ : /y\.tu ;' . 
Degree>< Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

The Undergraduate Program in Economics. Undergraduate majors 
are required to take a minimum of nine courses totaling twenty-seven semes- 
ter hours in economics, including: 

1. Economics 211, 212, and 370 

2. Either Economics 375 or 355 

3. At least three of the following: Economics 301; 355*: 415; 416; 417; 420; 
430; 435; 436; 438; 445; 448; 450; 461; 483; 485; 486 

*Students may take Economics 355 to satisfy this last requirement only if they have taken 
Economics 375 to satisfy the requirements in macro theory. 

Mathematics 101, 102 or 103, 104 and Mathematical Sciences 381 and 480 
are recommended for students intending to do graduate work in economics. 
Furthermore, in lieu of one or two semesters of course work, the department 
offers an independent work program, admission to which is granted on a 
selective basis. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 
and 51. 

The Graduate Program in Economics. Admission to graduate study in 
economics is granted each year to a limited number of students who hold an 
undergraduate degree (or the equivalent), whether in economics or another 
field. The graduate program is designed primarily for students qualified to 
pursue a course of study leading to the Ph.D. degree. 

Training in mathematics through calculus and linear algebra at the un- 
dergraduate level is advisable but is not a prerequisite for admission. The 
Economics Department also offers graduate work leading to the M.A. degree. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who have good undergraduate prepara- 
tion in economics should expect to devote two to two and one-half years to 
full-time study (or the equivalent) before taking the general examinations 
which must be passed before the submission of the doctoral dissertation. A 
minimum of one additional year is usually necessary for completion of the 
dissertation. Applicants are required to take the Graduate Record Exami- 
nation. 



142 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: 

1. Demonstrated proficiency in statistics, elementary mathematical econo- 
mics, and economic history or history of economic thought 

2. Completion of an approved program of graduate courses 

3. Satisfactory performance on written general examinations on: 

a. Economic theory 

b. A major field chosen from: (1) econometrics, (2) economic development, 
(3) industrial organization and regulation, (4) international trade and 
finance, (5) mathematical economics, (6) monetary economics, (7) public 
finance, (8) economic theory, or (9) economic history 

4. Satisfactory performance on an oral examination emphasizing the field of 
specialization and the methodology to be used in dissertation research 

5. Completion and oral defense of a doctoral dissertation setting forth in 
publishable form the results of original research 

Requirements for the Master's Degree: 

1. Thirty semester hours, including the thesis, with not more than nine semes- 
ter hours at the undergraduate level. 

2. Attainment of a grade point average exceeding 2.5 in all courses, except 
the thesis 

3. Successful completion of a master's thesis 

A master's degree may also be awarded to students who attain candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree. 



Economics Courses 

211a,b. Principles of Economies (3-0-3). 

Nature of economics; the price system; houseiiold decisions; production: cost and supply; 
marginal productivity and capital theory; industrial organization and control; economic effi- 
ciency, externalities, and public goods. Staff 

212b. Principles of Economies (3-0-3). 

Measurement and determination of national income; money, banking, and fiscafpolicy; 
business cycles, unemployment, and inflation; international trade and balance of payments; 
other contemporary economic problems. Prerequisite: Economics 211. Staff 

301b. History of Economic Analysis (3-0-3). 

The fundamental ideas of great economic thinkers from Plato to the present. Prerequisite: 
Economics 211. Mr. Rimlinger 

350a. Elements of Statistical Method (3-2-3). 

Basic concepts and techniques in probability theory and statistical inference. A student 
taking Economics 350 may not also receive credit for Mathematical Sciences 280. Mr. White 

355a. Money and Banking (3-0-3). 

Demand and supply of money; determinants of prices, interest, and income; American 
financial institutions; monetary policy; inflation. Prerequisite: Economics 211, 212. 

Mr. Smith 

370a,b. Microeeonomie Theory (3-0-3). 

Intermediate level analysis of markets, firms, households, income distribution and general 
equilibrium. Prerequisite: Economics 211. Mr. Young 

375a,b. Macroeconomic Theory (3-0-3). 

Intermediate level analysis of relationships between the levels of income, employment, 
interest, investment, consumption, and government spending. Prerequisite: Economics211, 212. 

Staff 
400b. Econometrics (3-0-3). 

Estimation and forecasting models: topics include multiple regression time-series, con- 
tingency table analysis, and Bayesian inference. Prerequisite: Economics 350 or Mathematical 
Sciences 380 and 381. Mr. White 



ECONOMICS 143 

403a, 404b. Senior Independent Research (0-0-3 each semester). 

Independent research project for seniors on an approved topic of their own choosing. 
Enrollment is by special permission. Staff 

415. Human Resources, Wages, and Welfare (3-0-3).t 

Study of labor markets and wage determination. Special emphasis on "investment in 
human capital" through education, training, and health services. Prerequisite: Economics 
211. 

416. Economic History of the U.S. 1700-1945 (3-0-3).t 

Economic history of the United States from the Colonial Period to the end of World War II. 
Attention will focus upon the trends in per capita income and the forces behind these trends. 
Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

417. Comparative History of Industrialization (3-0-3).t 

Comparative historical analysis of industrialization of Western Europe, the United States, 
and Russia from the eighteenth century to World War I. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

420b. International Economics (3-0-3). 

A study of the economic relationships between countries. Trade theory, tariffs and other 
trade restrictions, international finance, trade and development, and current policy issues. 
Prerequisite: Economics 211, 212. Mr. Smith 

430. Comparative Economic Systems (3-0-3).t 

Theoretical models of various economic systems as a basis for analyzing the operation and 
the institutional characteristics of economies including the U.S., the U.S.S.R., Yugoslavia, and 
China. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

435a. Industrial Organization (3-0-3). 

Market structure, concentration, barriers to entry, and oliogopoly pricing. Application of 
micro theory to industry problems. Prerequisite: Economics 211 or approval of instructor. 

Mr. Wright 

436b. Government Regulation of Business (3-0-3). 

Analysis of governmental regulatory activities under antitrust laws and in such regulated 
industries as communications, energy, and transportation. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 
Economics 370 and 435 suggested. Mr. Butler 

438b. Economics of the Law (3-0-3). 

The role of economic reasoning in understanding the enactment, interpretation, and en- 
forcement of the law. Applications to contracts, property, torts, discrimination, and criminal 
justice. Prerequisite: Economics 211. Mr. MrCalch 

445a. Managerial Economics (3-0-3). 

Application of economics to decision making within the firm; organization theory, cost, 
pricing, and problems of control. Prerequisite: Economics 211. Mr. Wright 

448b. Corporation Finance (3-0-3). 

Financial analysis, planning, and control in modern corporations; includes valuation, cost 
and allocation of capital, capital markets. Mr. Wright 

450b. World Economic and Social Development (3-0-3). 

Examines past and future development in advanced and poor countries emphasizing 
resources, population, entrepreneurship, education, and planning. Prerequisite: Economics 
211, 212. Mr. Huddle 

461a. Urban Economics (3-0-3). 

Economic analysis of the development and problems of urban areas with particular atten- 
tion to current policy issues. Prerequisite: Economics 211 or approval of instructor. 

Mr. Butler 

471a. Linear Programming (3-0-3). 

Formulation of managerial and technical problems; simplex method; revised simplex 
method; duality theory and applications; transportation problems; decomposition techniques. 
Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 471. Mr. Young 

475a. Operations Research, Deterministic Models (3-0-3). 

Optimization problems in a managerial and economic context. Familiarity with linear 
programming and microeconomic theory is strongly recommended. Also offered as Mathema- 
tical Sciences 475. 



144 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

476b. Operations Research, Stochastic Models (3-0-3). 

Decision theory, waiting-in-line theory, Markov chains, inventory models, replacement 
models, simulation. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 380 or 381. Also offered as Mathema- 
tical Sciences 476. Mr. Owen 

477b. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory I (3-0-3). 

Competitive economics from a mathematical perspective, unifying calculus, matrix 
algebra, and set-theoretic approaches. Theories of household, firm: production models. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 211, Mathematics 212, Mathematical Sciences 310. Also offered as 
Mathematical Sciences 477. Staff 

478b. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Economics 477, which is prerequisite. Also offered as Mathematical 
Sciences 478. 

483a. Public Finance (3-0-3). 

Ta.x and expenditure policies at the federal, state, and local levels: emphasizes resource 
allocation and equity. Prerequisite: Economics 211. Mr. McCaleb 

485, 486. Contemporary Economic Issues (3-0-3 each semester). t 

Analysis of urgent and significant economic problems. Emphasis on the evaluation of 
policy remedies. Principal topics vary from year to year. 

495a, 496b. Senior Seminar (3-0-3 each semester). 

Reading and discussion of topics in advanced economics. Open to seniors with special 
approval. Staff 

500a,b. Master's Thesis Research. 

Research on an approved topic in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master's 
degree. Staff 

501a. Advanced Microeconomic Theory (3-6-5). 

Theory of the firm, the theory of consumer behavior, duopoly, bilateral monopoly, imper- 
fect competition, capital theory, and the theory of income distribution. Staff 

502a. Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (3-6-5). 

Macroeconomic theory of employment, interest, and income. Considers the work of Keynes 
and subsequent developments. Mr. Kelly 

504b. Advanced Economic Statistics (3-6-5). 

Statistical inference and the testing of hypotheses: multiple and partial correlation 
analysis; analysis of variance and regression. Mr. Krzijzaniak 

505b. Monetary Theory (3-6-5). 

The nature of a monetary economv; asset choice: the role of financial institutions: inflation. 

Staff 
506b. Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3-6-5). 

Determination of money supply: tools of monetary policy: effectiveness of monetary and 
fiscal policy: policymaking under uncertainty. Staff 

507a. Mathematical Economics I (4-0-5). 

Theory of household, firm: activity analysis: set theory, matrix algebra, vector calculus, 
metric spaces, separation theory, constrained optimization. Staff 

508b. Mathematical Economics II (4-0-5). 

Continuation of Economics 507. Set theoretic approach to general equilibrium; aggregate 
linear and nonlinear production models: existence, stability, optimality. Staff 

509a. Theory of Public Finance (3-6-5). 

Governmental revenue and expenditures at the federal, state, and local levels: includes 
welfare economics, project analysis, taxation, incidence, tax reform, and fiscal federalism. 

Mr. McCaleb 

510b. Econometrics (3-6-5). 

Estimation and testing in econometric models: theoretical and applied econometrics. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematical statistics and linear algebra. Mr. White 

511b. Applied Econometrics (3-6-5). 

Estimation and testing of systems of equations; consumer demand systems, production 
functions, econometric models. Prerequisite: Economics 510. Mr. White 



ECONOMICS 145 

512a. International Trade Theory (3-6-5). 

Classical, neoclassical, and modern trade theory: some welfare aspects of trade, including 
the theory of commercial policy. Applications will be emphasized. Mr. Smith 

513. Topics in Managerial Economics (3-6-5).t 

Theory of investment of the firm; organization theory: problems in applying theory in 
decision-making. 

514b. Industrial Organizations and Control (3-6-5). 

Industrial markets and public policy. Mr. Wright 

515. Labor Economics (3-6-5).t 

The economics of the labor market and the economic implication of trade unions. Attention 
is given to major public policy issues. 

516. Economic History and Development (3-6-5).t 

Historical analysis of economic growth and industrialization of the U.S.. Western Europe, 
and Russia in the last 150 years. Stresses conditions which favored or retarded growth. 

517b. History of Economic Analysis (3-6-5). 

The development of economic analysis from the scholastics to the neoclassical school. 

Mr. Rimliuger 

518a. International Finance (3-6-5). 

International monetary problems; foreign exchange theory; international investments. 

Mr. Huddle 
519b. Economic Growth and Development (3-6-5). 

Analysis of theory and policy questions relating to the level and rate of economic develop- 
ment. Mr. Soligo 

520b, 521a. Workshop in Economics I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Intensive study of selected advanced topics. Mr. Huddle 

530a. Comparative Economic Systems (3-6-5). 

Analysis of theoretical models of market and centrally planned economies; national 
economic systems of the Soviet Union, China, Yugoslavia, Western European countries, and 
the United States. 

536b. Government Regulation of Industry (3-6-5). 

Advanced analysis of the economics of antitrust and other forms of regulation. Tlf/-. Butler 

561a. Urban Economics (3-6-5). 

Analysis of urban development and such urban problems as housing, land use, transporta- 
tion, discrimination, and pollution. Mr. Butler 

565a. Health Economics (3-6-5). 

Economic aspects of health; production, cost, demand and supply factors; methods of pay- 
ment and effects of regulation. Mr. Lair.'^ou. Mr. Swint 

573. Nonlinear Programming (3-0-3).t 

Theory and computational methods for nonlinear programming, including: Kuhn-Tucker 
conditions, duality theory, methods for constrained optimization of convex and nonconvex 
problems. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 573. 

577b. Topics in Mathematical Economics I (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in advanced mathematical economics. Prerequisite: Economics 508 or 
Economics/Mathematical Sciences 478. Staff 

578b. Topics in Mathematical Economics II (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in advanced mathematical economics. Prerequisite: Economics 508 or 
Economics/Mathematical Sciences 478. 

579b. Topics in Mathematical Economics III (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in advanced mathematical economics. Prerequisite: Economics 508 or 
Economics/Mathematical Sciences 478. 

591a, 592b. Topics in Policy and Applied Economics (3-6-5 each semester). 

Staff 

595a, 596b. Readings in Advanced Topics (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

600a,b. Doctoral Dissertation Research. staff 



146 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 

Education 



Professor Wood, Chairman 
Lecturers Baum and Duke, Director of Student Teaching 

Degrees Offered: Secondary Teaching Certificate in conjunction with B.A. in 
major field; Master of Arts in Teaching. 

Teacher Education and Certification. Rice University seeks to contri- 
bute graduates to society able to think and to question, educated to compre- 
hend and to cope with a rapidly changing world. Although professional 
instruction is not the primary ingredient of undergraduate education, the 
university's role in preparing students for their future life work cannot be 
ignored. While maintaining complete institutional integrity. Rice University 
supports the intention as well as the letter of regulations promulgated by 
the state governing the development and presentation of teacher preparation 
and certification programs. 

To this end the Rice University Department of Education closely cooper- 
ates with departments offering work in subject-matter fields. It is the function 
of this department to provide rigorous professional courses and to administer 
the established teacher education programs. 

The Rice University teacher education program strives to fit the prospec- 
tive teacher to perform all the roles which may be expected of a teacher. To 
accomplish this objective, it gives sustained close attention to the following 
vitally interrelated components: 

1. A sound liberal or general education 

2. An extended knowledge of the subject(s) or area(s) to be taught 

3. Professional knowledge, as distinguished from professional skills (i.e., 
relevant historical, philosophical, social, and psychological material) 

4. Skills in managing a classroom, in working with children and adults, and in 
the supervision of the learning process. 

Admission to the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program. 

Students who have satisfied the following requirements may apply to the 
Education Council for admission to the teacher education program: 

1. Junior standing at Rice University 

2. Satisfactory completion of History 105, 106 or 211, 212 

3. A grade average of 3 or better in at least 75 percent of all semester hours 
attempted in the teaching field offered for approval 

4. Passing grades in freshman and sophomore English courses 

5. Evidence of satisfactory speech patterns 

6. Evidence of adequate physical vigor and strength and absence of obvious 
physical conditions which might interfere materially with performance in 
a classroom as a teacher 

7. Approval of a completed Teacher Certification Program form by the 
appropriate departmental representatives and the Education Council 
prior to registration for the junior year 



EDUCATION 147 

8. Approval of the completed form "Application for Admission to the Teacher 
Education Program" by the Education Council prior to registration for the 
junior year ^ ^^^ . 

Texas State Requirements For Secondary Provisional Certificate 
(Grades 7-12): 

A Provisional Teacher's Certificate is based upon a bachelor's degree, 
satisfactory completion of an approved teacher-preparatory program, and 
the recommendation of the university. Rice University is approved to offer the 
following teacher-preparatory programs: biology, chemistry, earth science, 
economics, English, French, German, health, history, Latin, mathematics, 
physical education, physics, political science, psychology, Russian, general 
science, social studies, sociology, and Spanish. 

The approved program shall consist of the following: 

1. Foundations in Arts and Sciences: Approximately two years including: 

A. English, twelve semester hours 
American history, six semester hours 

\ Government, six semester hours .' ' ' ^^ . 

From two of the following, twelve semester hours 
Science ' ' 'y'' 

Mathematics . ■ -■ 

Foreign language 

B. Other institutional degree requirements 

2. Academic Specialization: ; .i v; , •'. • , -.r ; «;!■;■ o.' , 
Plan I. Preparation to teach two fields: 

Twenty-four semester hours in each area including twelve semes- 
ter hours of advanced work in each, with approval of the Rice 

Education Council 

Plan II. Preparation to teach related fields: > 

Forty-eight semester hours in a composite field (such as general 
science or social studies) with at least eighteen semester hours of 
advanced work and with approval of the Rice Education Council 

3. Professional Education: eighteen semester hours, of which six semester 
hours shall be in student teaching 

Jf. Elective courses 

Requirements for completion of the Teacher Education Program; to be 
recommended to the Texas Education Agency for certification, a student must 
satisfy all institutional requirements for a bachelor's degree which will 
include: 

A. Completion of History 105, 106 or 211, 212 and Political Science 209, 
210 before the junior year 

B. Twenty-four semester hours of credit in each of two teaching fields or 
forty-eight semester hours of credit in a composite field 

C. Completion of the required professional education courses 

D. Satisfaction of the supervised student teaching requirement (Educa- 
tion 419) as outlined below 

Supervised Teaching Experience. Either of two distinct plans may be 
followed by teacher education candidates. The main difference is the type of 
supervised teaching experience provided. 



148 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

1. The Apprenticeship Plan (Plan A): 

Prerequisite: Education 311, 312 

Apprenticeship is designed for students who wish to complete prepara- 
tion for their teaching careers in four years and two six-week summer sessions. 
Candidates will enroll for the summer session followingtheir junior year. The 
apprentice will observe teaching, act as a helping teacher, and perhaps teach 
as may be appropriate in the Rice Summer School for High School Students. 

Education 410 is to be completed during the senior year. 

Following graduation from Rice the apprentice will attend the summer 
session for full-time teaching in the Rice Summer School for High School 
Students under the supervision and guidance of a Master Teacher and the 
university staff. While the apprentice spends somewhat less time in student 
teaching than under the internship plan, he or she is not remunerated for the 
teaching service. The apprentice is to be recommended for Texas Provisional 
Teacher's Certificate following successful completion of the second summer 
session. 

2. The Internship Plan (Plan B): 

Prerequisite: twelve semester hours in education courses 
Under this plan students are expected to attend a six-week summer 
session immediately following their graduation from Rice. Each intern will 
observe and teach classes under the supervision of a Master Teacher and a 
university staff member in the Rice Summer School for High School Students. 
During the following fall semester interns will be assigned to classrooms in a 
neighboring school system and may select one of two plans dependent upon the 
availability of a suitable position. 

A. Employed on a full-time basis, the intern will teach three classes, be 
assigned occasionally as a substitute teacher, and perform other school-related 
tasks as stipulated. The intern will be supervised by a teacher at his Assigned 
school and a staff member from the university. During the half year of their 
service, interns will be paid a salary commensurate with the salary being paid 
to substitute teachers by cooperating school systems for their employment as 
classroom teachers. Upon the successful conclusion of the internship semester 
and upon the recommendation of the appropriate secondary school principal, 
the intern will be given preference for a regular teaching position in the spring 
semester should there be a suitable vacancy and will be recommended for a 
Texas Provisional Teacher's Certificate. However, there is no guarantee that 
the intern will be offered a regular teaching position the semester following 
internship. 

B. The intern will be employed for full-time duty and will teach five 
periods per day under the supervision and guidance of a staff member of the 
cooperating school system and a staff member from the university. During the 
half year of service the intern will be paid for employment as a classroom 
teacher a salary commensurate with the salary being paid a full-time teacher 
with a degree and an emergency teaching permit by cooperating school sys- 
tems. Upon successful completion of the internship semester and upon the 
recommendation of the appropriate secondary school principal, the intern 
will be offered a regular teaching contract for the spring semester if a suitable 
vacancy exists and will be recommended for a Texas Provisional Teacher's 
Certificate. 



The Master of Arts in Teaching. The professional education degree is 
based on one academic year and two summers of satisfactory graduate work 



EDUCATION 149 

consisting of the program prescribed below: 

1. Introductory courses in education (during the first summer session) de- 
veloped in conjunction with observation and actual teaching in the Rice 
Summer School for High School Students under the guidance of master 
teachers and university faculty 

2. Courses in secondary school educational theory, teaching strategies, edu- 
cational objectives, and evaluation 

3. Graduate and upper division courses in the candidate's two subject-matter 
teaching fields and/or related fields, equivalent to a full semester of 
graduate study 

4. Supervised teaching internship for one semester in a cooperating public 
school system 

5. Practicum (second summer session). Supervised full-time teaching in the 
Rice Summer School for High School Students. Candidates will be respon- 
sible for the design and implementation of courses, for teaching, and for 
evaluation 

Normally, the degree program will consist of ten semester courses. How- 
ever, some candidates may need to remove deficiencies in their teaching or 
related fields or in state-mandated fields, and may therefore require addi- 
tional time. Candidates will begin their program in the summer preceding 
their academic year of residence. 

Students in the program will not normally be eligible for Rice Graduate 
Fellowships or scholarship support since the cooperating school districts will 
pay a salary for internship teaching. 

Please refer to page 94 for additional information regarding admission to 
the graduate program in education. 



Education Courses 

304b. Seminar in Teaching (junior-level apprentice teachers only) (1-0-1). 

A study of procedures and materials used in teaching various subject areas. Preparation of 
resource units, orientation to secondary school teaching. Staff 

311a. The Historical and Philosophical Foundation of Education (3-0-3). 

Analysis of contemporary and recent theories useful in planning educative activities of the 
secondary school. Prerequisite: History 211, 212 or History 105, 106, or consent of instructor, 
and filing of Teacher Certification Plan. Mr. Duke. Mr. Wood 

312b. Human Development: The Psychology of Human Learning (3-0-3). 

Introduction to theoretical systems of human learning with emphasis on implications for 
secondary education, introductory tests and measurements. Mr. Wood, Mr. Duke 

400b. Seminar in Teaching (apprentice English teachers only) (2-0-2). 

Same as Education 304. Mr. Wood 

402b. Seminar in Teaching (apprentice social studies teachers only) (2-0-2). 
Same as Education 304. Mr. Baitm 

404b. Seminar in Teaching (apprentice math and science teachers only) 
(2-0-2). 
Same as Education 304. Mr. Duke 

406b. Seminar in Teaching (apprentice health and physical education 
teachers only) (2-0-2). 
Same as Education 304. Mr. Duke 

408b. Seminar in Teaching (apprentice foreign language teachers only) 
(2-0-2). 
Same as Education 304. Mr. Wood 



150 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

409a. Fundamentals of Secondary Education (3-0-3). 

Background, purposes and organization of modern secondary education curriculum and 
current trends in administration of secondary schools. Introductory educational research. 

Mr. Baum, Mr. Wood 

410b. Seminar in Teaching (English teachers only) (3-0-3). 

Same as Education 304. Mr. Wood 

412b. Seminar in Teaching (social studies teachers only) (3-0-3). 

Same as Education 304. Mr. Baum 

414b. Seminar in Teaching (math and science teachers only) (3-0-3). 

Same as Education 304. Mr. Duke 

415a. Seminar in Teaching: Media Techniques (3-0-3). 

Students will explore the existing film literature, explore the creative and orderly processes of 
film making, produce two films, and complete an advanced individual project. Staff 

416b. Seminar in Teaching (health and physical education teachers only) 

(3-0-3). 

Same as Education 304. Mr. Baum 

418b. Seminar in Teaching (foreign language teachers only) (3-0-3). 

Same as Education 304. Mr. Wood 

419a,b; 420c. Principles of Teaching (3-0-3 each semester). 

Introduction to teaching in the secondary school and supervised teaching. Staff 

422b. Seminar in Innovative Teaching (3-0-3). 

Educational trends such as modified scheduling, personalized instruction, open concept, 
and interdisciplinary learning. Newspaper-centered materials utilizing the best innovative 
practices now influencing secondary education. Mr. Baum 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 

Engineering and Applied Science 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Rice's engineering programs have been prominent since the early days of 
the university. The five departments, each of which is strong in teaching and 
research, now comprise the George R. Brown School of Engineering. The 
school was dedicated in 1975 at ceremonies honoring the distinguished Rice 
alumnus, trustee, and benefactor who was a founding partner in Brown & 
Root, Inc. Professor Alan J. Chapman, professor of mechanical engineering 
and a member of the faculty since 1949, is dean of the school. 

General Undergraduate Information. Curricula in engineering at Rice 
University lead to either Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees in 
the fields of chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, 
mechanical engineering, and materials science. These curricula are also part 
of integrated five-year programs that lead to professional master's degrees 
in each of the above fields and in environmental science and engineering. 

A student taking the B.A. program in engineering is required to pass a 
total of at least 120 semester hours (forty courses) in order to graduate. The 
major department may require no more than 80 specific semester hours for 
the major and may require fewer. Students must complete at least 60 semester 
hours in addition to the departmental major requirements. Some departments 
require more than 120 semester hours for graduation. 

A student following a B.S. program in engineering (other than chemical 
engineering) must pass a total of at least 134 semester hours in order to 



ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE 151 

graduate (137 semester hours for chemical engineering). Except for chemical 
engineering, which may require up to 104 semester hours in specific course 
requirements, no department may require more than 92 semester hours in 
specific courses for the B.S. degree. Each student should get a list of required 
courses from the appropriate department. Freshmen and sophomores should 
have their programs approved each semester by an engineering adviser as 
well as by their college adviser. Before registering for the junior year students 
must associate themselves with an adviser in the department of their major. 
Registration for every semester thereafter must be approved by an adviser in 
their major department. 

A program which satisfies the requirements of all engineering depart- 
ments for the first year is given below. There is enough difference in the 
second-year requirements so that it is not possible for a student to keep entry 
into all engineering departments open during the second year. Proper orienta- 
tion during the first year, however, should make such a plan unnecessary. All 
courses that are required in the second year by any of the engineering depart- 
ments are also given below. Not all of the second-year courses shown are 
essential in the second year; some may be taken in the third or fourth year. 
There are also some courses that departments recommend but do not require 
in the second year. Thus it is most important for students to pick up lists of 
required and recommended courses from departments they are considering 
for a major. This should be done early enough to plan courses for the second 
year. 

Firi^t year 

Mathematics 101, 102 (or equivalent honors courses) (required by all engineer- 
ing departments) 
Physics 101, 102, 132 (required by all engineering departments) 
Chemistry 101, 102, 107 

Electives (four semester courses) . > ^ 

Basic Health and Physical Education 
ROTC, if elected 

Second year Required by 

Mathematics 211, 212 All departments 

(or corresponding honors courses) 
Engineering 200 Mechanical Engineering 

Engineering 211 Civil Engineering, Mechanical 

Engineering, Materials Science 
Engineering 240 Chemical Engineering, Materials 

Science, Mechanical Engineering 
Engineering 241 Electrical Engineering, Mechanical 

Engineering, Materials Science 
Chemical Engineering 301 Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry 211, 212, 213, 214 Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 251 Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering 300 Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering 302 Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering 304 Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 220 Electrical Engineering 

Materials Science 395, 397 Materials Science 

Mathematical Sciences 223 Chemical Engineering (substitute 

for Engineering 240) 



152 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The undergraduate courses listed below are offered for the preparation of 
students majoring in all branches of engineering. 

Engine e r in g Cou rses 

101. Introduction to Engineering Design (3-3-4). t 

Provides an introduction to engineering design and an orientation to engineering at Rice. 
The laboratory is devoted to design competition and to visiting engineering firms. 

142. Introduction to Engineering Materials (3-0-3). t 

The nature of solid materials, their structural, mechanical, physical, electrical, magnetic, 
and chemical properties. Metallic engineering materials, semiconductors, and insulators are 
emphasized. 

200b. Classical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A fundamental exposition of the laws of classical thermodynamics and deductions there- 
from. Applications illustrated with particular attention to pure substances. Prerequisite: 
Physics 101, 102. Mr. Chapman, Mr. Walker, Mr. Wierum 

201b. Engineering Drawing (2-3-3). 

Engineering drawing as a means of communication. Orthographic projection, pictorial 
projection, dimensioning, lettering, sketching, and computer graphics. Mr. S/m.s 

211a. Engineering Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Equilibrium of static systems, dynamics of a particle, dynamics of particle systems, and 
rigid-body dynamics. Elements of vibrational analysis. Prerequisite: Physics 101, 102, 
Mathematics 101, 102 Ms. Bayazitoglu, Mr. Picologlou, Mr. Merwin 

240a,b. Digital Computing for Engineering and Science (3-3-4). 

Programming; algorithms and flow charts; languages. Fortran programming. Data 
structures and representation. Numeric and non-numeric computing techniques. Introduction 
to numerical analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 102. Mr. Holt 

241a,b. Electrical Circuits (3-4-4). 

Models of electrical circuit elements. Formulation, solution, and interpretation of network 
equations. Application to electronic circuits, signal analysis, and general system theory. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 101, 102. Mr. Burrut^, Ms. Kazakos 

401. Legal Topics for the Design Professional (3-0-3).t 

Contracts, professional liability, intellectual property, business associations, administra- 
tive law, employee-employer relationships, governmental regulations, regulation of the design 
professional. 



Chemical Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor S. H. Davis, Chairman; Professors Akers, Armeniades, Deans, 

Dyson, Heliums, Hightower, Kobayashi, Leland, and Mclntire 

Adjunct Professors Elliot, G. D. Fisher, and Jackson 

Visiting Professor J. M. Davidson 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. A general outline of the first two years of an 
undergraduate engineering program is given under Engineering and 
Applied Science. A list of courses specifically required by the department is 
available from the chemical engineering adviser in each college or from the 
departmental office, 246 Abercrombie Lab. 

The undergraduate curriculum in chemical engineering is designed to 
provide a sound scientific and technical basis for further professional de- 
velopment. Concurrently, the student has the opportunity of concentration in 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 153 

a particular technical specialty such as applied mathematics, biomedical en- 
gineering, nuclear technology, environmental quality, kinetics and catalysis, 
engineering economics, or polymer science and engineering. 

In the four-year curriculum a student may qualify for either the Bachelor 
of Arts degree or the Bachelor of Science degree. The Bachelor of Arts 
program is highly flexible and allows a student to pursue other areas of interest 
with or without a double major. The Bachelor of Science program has a higher 
content of scientific and professional courses. On completion of either bachelor's 
program a student is eligible to apply for a fifth year of specialized study leading 
to the degree of Master of Chemical Engineering. The curriculum is designed so 
that outstanding students interested in careers in research and teaching may 
enter graduate school after either of the bachelor's degrees. 

The Chemical Engineering Department requires 77 semester hours in the 
major for the B.A. degree, prerequisites and laboratory courses included. In 
addition to these requirements, students must also satisfy the distribution re- 
quirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours outside the depart- 
mental requirements for a total of at least 137 semester hours. For the B.S. major, 
the department may require up to 104 semester hours, according to the require- 
ments for certification, prerequisites and laboratory courses included. Students 
seeking the B.S. must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no 
fewer than 33 semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a total 
of at least 137 semester hours. 

Graduate Program. Graduate study in chemical engineering can lead 
either to the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy. University require- 
ments for these degrees are outlined on pages 91 and 92. 

Candidates for the Master of Science degree are required to complete a 
minimum of twenty-four approved semester hours with high standing. They 
must also submit and defend the thesis in an oral examination indicating 
research ability. 

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must demonstrate com- 
petence in one foreign language and in the areas of applied mathematics, 
thermodynamics, transport processes, and chemical kinetics and reactor 
design, by passing qualifying examinations, normally during the first year of 
study. They must also complete a minimum of thirty-six approved semester 
hours with high standing and submit a thesis which provides evidence of 
their ability to carry out original research in a specialized area of chemical 
engineering. The thesis must be defended in a public oral examination. 

Chemical Engineering Coiirses 

301b. Chemical Engineering Fundamentals (3-0-3). 

The use of basic mathematical concepts, physical laws, stoichiometry, and the thermo- 
dynamic properties of matter to obtain material and energy balance for steady and unsteady 
state systems. Required for sophomores intending to major in chemical engineering. 

Mr. Deans, Mr. Mclntire 

302a. Separation Processes (3-0-3). 

A systematic treatment of single and multistage contacting operations involving binary 
and multicomponent systems. Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 301. 

Mr. Akerft, Mr. Kobaijai<hi 



344b. Chemical Engineering Laboratory (1-3-2). 

Experiments demonstrating the principles presented in Chemical Engineering 301, 302. 

Staff 



154 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

401a, 402b. Introduction to Transport Phenomena (3-0-3 each semester). 

The fundamental principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport applied to the con- 
tinuum; analysis of macroscopic physical systems based on the continuum equations. Pre- 
requisite: Chemical Engineering 302 or permission of instructor. Mr. Heliums 

403a. Equipment Design I (3-3-4). 

Applications of the basic principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics to the design 
and performance of process equipment. A supervised computation laboratory included. 

Mr. Mclntire. Mr. Dijfton 

404b. Equipment Design II (3-3-4). 

Continuation of 403 including optimal design of chemical reactors and transfer equipment, 
and an introduction to process control. Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 490 or permission 
of instructor. Mr. Armeniades, Mr. 



411a. Fundamentals of Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Development and application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. 

Mr. Davidson 

427a. Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3-0-3). 

Human health effects; sources of air pollution. Properties and processes of the atmospheric 
medium: stability, turbulence, mixing, transport of pollutants, radiation, photochemistry, 
aerosol physics, and precipitation. Also offered as Environmental Science and Engineering 405 
and Mechanical Engineering 479. 

443a, 444b. Chemical Engineering Laboratory (1-3-2 each semester). 

Experiments demonstrating transport coefficient measurement, forced and free convec- 
tion transfer operations, and thermodynamic principles as covered in Chemical Engineering 
401, 402, 411. Staff 

490b. Chemical Reaction Kinetics (3-0-3). 

Rates of chemical reactions; the kinetics of complex reaction systems; interactions between 
chemical rates and transport phenomena; theory of chemical reactors. Mr. Hightotver 

501a. Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes (3-0-3). 

Advanced study in fluid mechanics and transport processes including analytical and 
numerical approximation methods, boundary layer theory, and hydrodynamic stability. 

Mr. Heliums 

503a. Simulation and Design of Chemical Engineering Process I (2-3-3). 

A synthesis course applying the principles of staged processes, transport phenomena, 
kinetics, and economics to the simulation, design, and operation of equipment and processes. 

Mr. Deans 

504b. Simulation and Design of Chemical Engineering Processes II (2-3-3). 

Continuation of 503, with emphasis on the use of available process design computer 
programs. Mr. Kobayashi 

512b. Thermodynamics II (3-0-3). 

An advanced treatment of chemical and physical equilibrium in multicomponent systems. 
A detailed study of non-ideal solutions. Mr. Leland 

522b. Design with Flowtran (3-3-4). 

Description of the Monsanto Flowtran Simulation Program. Use of the simulator to design 
processes. Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 403, working knowledge of Fortran Pro- 
gramming. Enrollment limited. Mr. Dyson 

528b. Air Pollution and Its Abatement (3-0-3). 

Atmospheric physics and chemistry of gaseous and particulate pollutants; relationship 
between emissions and air quality; engineering, economics, and politics of abatement. Also 
offered as Environmental Science and Engineering 528. Mr. Deans 

532. Nuclear Engineering Design (3-0-3).t 

551a/b. Advanced Separation Processes (3-0-3). 

Multistage calculations for multicomponent systems; digital computer solutions of separa- 
tion problems; development of mathematical models for real stages. Mr. Dyson 

571a. Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering (3-0-3). 

Basic reservoir engineering principles — single and two phase flow in porous media. 

Mr. Deans 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 155 

591a. Kinetics, Catalysis and Reactor Design (3-0-3). 

Description of an interpretation of chemical kinetics in heterog-eneous reactions; theories of 
catalysis, diffusion in porous solids, reactor design, and optimization. Mr. Highfowcr 

593a. Polymer Science and Engineering (3-0-3). 

Basic concepts in macromolecular chemistry and their application in the synthesis and 
chemical modification of polymers. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211, 212. Mr. Arnwinadcti 

594b. Structure and Properties of Polymers (3-0-3). 

Molecular organization and physical properties of polymeric materials; elastomeric, semi- 
crystalline, and glassy polymers; processing and technology of polymeric systems. Also offered 
as Materials Science 594. Mr. Anne)ii(rde?: 

601a/b. Advanced Topics in Fluid Mechanics and Transport (3-0-3). 

Advanced study in several areas of fluid mechanics or transport including tensor analysis 
continuum mechanics, rheology, and mathematical methods of special interest in fluid 
mechanics. Mr. Mchitire 

602b. Physico-chemical Hydrodynamics (3-0-3). 

Topics in hydrodynamics including waves on liquid surfaces, diffusion in liquids, motion of 
drops and bubbles, and electrophoresis. Mr. Mclntire 

611a. Advanced Topics in Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Methods of predicting the thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous and liquid 
mixtures. Special emphasis on fluids encountered in natural gas processing and petroleum 
refining. Mr. Leland 

631a, 632b. Nuclear Engineering I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Introductory course in nuclear properties, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay, neutron 
diffusion, and fission. Theory design of nuclear reactors using the Fermi Age treatment and 
introductory reactor kinetics. Mr. Leland 

660. Heterogeneous Equilibrium and the Phase Rule (3-0-3).t 

661a, 662b. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1 each semester). Staff 

671a. Reservoir Engineering (3-0-3). 

The applied mathematics and physics of flow in porous media. Sfaff 

672. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (3-0-3).t Mr. Mdntire 

675a/b. Process Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Dynamic equations for discreta and continuous models of chemical systems. Linearization 
applied to control problems in chemical processes. Simulation techniques using digital com- 
puters. Stability and phase plane analysis. Mr. Daris 

683a, 684b. M.S. Research and Thesis. 

685. Molecular Theory of Fluids (3-0-3).t 

692b. Advanced Topics in Chemical Reaction Engineering (3-0-3). 

Mr. Deans 

700c. Summer Research. 

720a/b. Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering (3-0-3). 

730a/b. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Engineering (3-0-3). 

Biomechanics and biomaterials: structure and function of extracellular supportive tissue 
in skeletal and cardiovascular systems; design, development, and evaluation of synthetic 
polymers for structural tissue replacement. Mr. Armeniades 

783a, 784b. Doctoral Research and Thesis. 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



156 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Civil Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor Austin, Chairman; Professors Krahl, Merwin, 

Sims, and Veletsos 

Associate Professors Holt and Lutes 

Lecturer Ghazzaly 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.C.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

Preceptors 

George E. Brandow William J. LeMessurier 

Brandow and Johnston Associates LeMessurier Associates/SCI 
Los Angeles, California Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Fazlur R. Khan E. 0. Pfrang 

Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill National Bureau of Standards 

Chicago, Illinois Washington, D.C. 

W. B. Pieper 

Brown and Root, Inc. 

Houston, Texas 

The profession of civil engineering is concerned with the development, 
planning, design, construction, and operation of large facilities and systems. 
These include buildings, bridges, and other structures of various forms; 
transportation systems, water supply systems, and systems for waste disposal 
and pollution control. The planning of new communities and the redevelop- 
ment of existing cities are also within the spectrum of civil engineering activi- 
ties. 

Undergraduate Program. The curriculum is designed to provide a 
sound basis for future professional growth. Two programs are offered, a basic 
program which has considerable strength in structural engineering and an 
environmental option given in collaboration with the Environmental Science 
and Engineering Department. Each is a broad program that includes funda- 
mental courses in mathematics and the engineering sciences and specialized 
courses in structural engineering and mechanics, geotechnical engineering, 
transportation engineering, and environmental engineering. Many advanced 
courses in structural engineering and mechanics and in environmental engi- 
neering may be taken as free electives by students interested in more speciali- 
zation. 

The accredited professional degree in civil engineering is the Bachelor of 
Science in Civil Engineering. A Bachelor of Arts degree with a civil 
engineering major is also available. The B.A. program has less technical 
content than the B.S.C.E. program and hence more flexibility with electives. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distrubution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours for the B.A. and 42 semester hours for the B.S. outside the 
departmental requirements for a total program of at least 129 semester hours 
for the B.A. and 134 for the B.S. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. Detailed course requirements for each degree may be obtained from 
the departmental office. The program of each student is formulated in 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 157 

consultation with an adviser. 

The Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering is a suitable terminal degree 
for students interested in a professional career, but a master's degree is 
highly desirable. The Doctor of Philosophy degree is generally required for a 
career in teaching or in research and development. A student may apply for 
admission to the graduate program in civil engineering after receiving either 
bachelor's degree. 

Preceptorship Program. A limited number of preceptorships are avail- 
able on a competitive basis for civil engineering majors. After completing the 
requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, a student works 
for one year in the office of, and under the personal guidance of, a civil engi- 
neer who has achieved national or international prominence in the profession. 
The student is enrolled at Rice during the preceptorship year and then returns 
to Rice for a year of graduate study. The program is designed to provide the 
student with an opportunity to experience the professional practice of engi- 
neering at its highest contemporary level. 

Graduate Program. Programs of study in structural engineering and 
structural mechanics can lead to the degrees of Master of Civil Engineering, 
Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. Special attention is given to 
developing the student's interest in and ability for independent study and 
research in the M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs. 

The requirements for a professional Master of Civil Engineering degree 
are described on pages 94-95. University requirements for other advanced 
degrees are described on pages 91-92. Departmental requirements for the 
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are as follows: A candidate for the Master of Science 
degree is required to (1) complete at least twenty-one semester hours of 
approved semester courses; (2) complete an acceptable thesis; and (3) pass a 
final oral examination on the thesis. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy must satisfy the following requirements: (1) complete at least 
forty-eight semester hours of approved courses with high standing; (2) pass a 
comprehensive preliminary examination and a qualifying examination 
designed to test the candidate's knowledge of the field and ability to think in a 
creative manner; (3) complete a thesis which shall constitute an original con- 
tribution to knowledge; (4) pass a final oral examination on the thesis and 
related topics; and (5) demonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign 
language, usually French, German, or Russian. 

The research interests of the members of the civil engineering faculty lie 
in the areas of structural and foundation dynamics, including earthquake 
engineering, applications of probability theory to civil engineering problems, 
particularly random vibrations, behavior of concrete components and struc- 
tural systems, structural instability, plasticity, optimization of structural 
design, experimental studies of fatigue in steel structural assemblies, and the 
design of innovative structural systems. 



Civil Engineering Courses 

251a. Plane Surveying (2-3-3). experimental techniques; behavior of 

structural elements. Mr. Merwin 

300b. Introduction to Mechanics of Solids (3-0-3). 

Stresses and deformation due to various loads. Study of engineering properties of materials 
and failure theories. Prerequisite: Engineering 211 or equivalent. Mr. Merwin 

302b. Strength of Materials Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Standard tension, compression, and torsion tests of ferrous and nonferrous metals; exper- 
imental techniques; behavior of structural elements. Mr. Merwin 



158 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

304b. Elementary Structural Analysis (2-0-2). 

Analysis of statically determinate structures. Stability and determinancy. Influence lines. 
Approximate analysis of indeterminate structures. Prerequisite: Engineering 211 and con- 
current registration in Civil Engineering 300. Mr. Holt 

307a. Structural Analysis and Design I (4-0-4). 

Stress analysis of statically determinate structures. Design of steel members, connections, 
and assemblies. Behavior of steel as related to design. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 300. 

Mr. Holt 
308b. Structural Analysis and Design II (4-0-4). 

Deflections of statically determinate structures. Analysis of statically indeterminate 
structures. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 307. Mr. Au.<<tin 

363a. Applied Fluid Mechanics (3-3-4). 

Fluid properties, hydrostatics, and fluid flow equations. Fluid forces, continuity, energy, 
and momentum principles and applications. Fluid resistance, boundary layer theory, pipe 
network analysis and drag forces. Also offered as Environmental Science and Engineering 311. 

Mr. BcdU'nt 
403a. Structural Analysis and Design III (3-3-4). 

Behavior and design of reinforced concrete members and structural assemblies. Introduc- 
tion to prestressed concrete. Laboratory tests of materials and reinforced concrete members. 
Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 307. Mr. Austin 

413b. Design of Structural Systems I (3-0-3). 

Structural systems for wood buildings, high-rise buildings, concrete thin-shell roofs, space 
trusses; also intermediate-span bridges, long-span suspension bridges. For graduate credit a 
student should register for Civil Engineering .517. Prerequisite or corequisite: Civil Envi- 
neering 403. Meets with Architecture 413. Mr. Krahl 

414. Design of Structural Systems II (3-0-3).t 

Structural systems for low-rise buildings, industrialized building systems, cable-sup- 
ported roofs, inflatables; also short-span bridges, long-span truss bridges. For graduate credit 
a student should register for Civil Engineering 518. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 403. 
Meets with Architecture 414. 

451b. Introduction to Transportation (3-0-3). 

Operational characteristics of transport modes, elements of transportation planning, and 
design of stationary elements. Mr. Lute.<i 

464b. Hydrology and Watershed Analysis (3-3-4). 

Atmospheric processes, precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, ground-water flow and 
surface runoff. Stream-flow hydrograph techniques: flood routing in open channels and river 
systems. Hydrologic analysis of a local watershed. Also listed as Environmental Science and 
Engineering 412. Mr. Bedient 

470a. Basic Soil Mechanics (3-3-4). 

Soil exploration, soil properties and behavior, soil classifications, hydraulics of soil 
moisture, consolidation and settlement, strength characteristics, soil stabilization, lateral 
earth pressure, slope stability. Mr. Sims 

491b. Civil Engineering Professional Practice (3-0-3). 

A course to acquaint the students with the professional aspects of engineering work: 
project financing, elements of contracts and specifications, manuals of professional practice. 

495. Design of Civil Engineering Systems (3-0-3). t 

The material covered in previous civil engineering courses is integrated along with 
economic and financial considerations into the synthesis of civil engineering systems. 

499a/b. Special Problems (Credit variable). 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations, special lectures, and seminars. 

Staff 
500a. Advanced Mechanics of Solids (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in stress analysis, curved beams; beams on elastic supports; plates; torsion 
of noncircular sections; columns; buckling: plate analysis. Mr. Meririn 

501a, 502b. Preceptorship Program 

Student completes nine to fifteen months of full-time internship in a selected professional 
office under the guidance of an appointed preceptor. Staff 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 159 

503b. Structural Analysis by Matrix Methods (3-0-3). 

Flexibility and stiffness of structural elements. Compatibility and equilibrium. Force and 
displacement methods of analysis. Finite element methods. Nonlinear structures. Prerequisite: 
Civil Engineering 308 or equivalent. Mr. Holt 

506. Experimental Stress Analysis ( 1-6-3). t 

Strain measurement methods; mechanical and electrical resistance strain gauges; photo- 
elastic methods: analogies; instrumentation: analysis of experimental data. 

507a. Numerical Methods of Structural Analysis (3-0-3). 

Numerical analysis of beams, beam-columns, and beams on elastic foundations; influence 
lines: buckling loads; natural frequencies. Integration of initial value problems; dynamic 
analysis. Mr. Ai(.-^tin 

508. Engineering Analysis (3-0-3).t 

Methods of formulating equations for discrete (lumped parameter) and continuous systems. 
Energj' methods, finite difference, discrete element, and series methods for continuous boundary 
value problems. Eigenvalue problems. Applications in structural mechanics. 

511a. Optimality in Design (3-0-3). 

Application of optimization techniques, probability theory, and economic analysis to 
design and operation of civil engineering systems. Topics include problem formulation, linear 
and nonlinear optimization, and scheduling problems. Mr. Lxtefi 

512. Applications of Probability Theory (3-0-3).t 

Probability, statistics, and decision theory applied to problems of design and operation of 
civil engineering systems. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 381. 

514a. Theoretical Plasticity (3-0-3). 

Formulation of basic laws of isotropic and anisotropic plastic flow; yield and loading sur- 
faces, normality and convexity requirement, and hardening rules; plane plastic flow problems 
and slip-line field theory; introduction to limit analysis theorems. Also offered as Mechanical 
Engineering 514. Mr. Cheatham 

515b. Applied Plasticity (3-0-3). 

Problems in limit analysis and design, plastic behavior of structures: flexure and torsion of 
prismatic members, axially-symmetric problems. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 
515. . Mr. Merwin 

516a. Plates (3-0-3). 

Introduction to theories of plates with applications to practical problems. Mr. Velet.'^os 

517b. Design of Structural Systems I (3-0-3). 

Structural systems for wood buildings, high-rise buildings, concrete thin-shell roofs, space 
trusses; also intermediate-span bridges, long-span suspension bridges. Prerequisite: Civil 
Engineering 403. Meets with Architecture 611. Mr. Krahl 

518. Design of Structural Systems II (3-0-3).t 

Structural systems for low-rise buildings, industrialized building systems, cable-supported 
roofs, inflatables; also short-span bridges; long-span truss bridges. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 
403. Meets with Architecture 612. Mr. Krahl 

519. Shells (3-0-3).t 

Introduction to theories of shells with applications to practical problems. Mr. Veletsos 

521a. Structural Dynamics I (3-0-3). 

Dynamics of force-excited linear structures having from one to an infinite number of 
degrees of freedom, with application to design. Mr. Velet^os 

522. Structural Dynamics II (3-0-3).t 

Dynamics of ground-excited elastic and inelastic structures. Introduction to earthquake 
engineering, problems of foundation vibration, and dynamics of foundation-structure systems. 

523b. Random Vibration (3-0-3). 

Dynamic response of structural systems to excitations characterized as stochastic pro- 
cesses. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 521. Mr. Lutes 

524. Stress Waves in Solids (3-0-3).t 

Theory of wave propagation with applications to structural engineering. 



160 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

526b. Structural Stability (3-0-3). 

Stability criteria. Flexural and tortional buckling of columns and frames, lateral buckling 
of beams, plate buckling. Effect of imperfections on strength. Beam-columns. Evaluation of 
design code provisions. Mr. Austin 

531. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Members (3-0-3).t 

Strength and behavior of reinforced concrete members under various loadings from first 
application of load to ultimate load. 

532b. Prestressed Concrete (3-0-3). 

Methods of prestressing. Behavior and design of prestressed concrete members subjected 
to axial force, flexure, shear, and torsion. Mr. Krahl 

570b. Foundation Engineering (3-0-3). 

Geotechnical engineering applications to the analysis, design, and construction of shallow 
and deep foundations and earth retaining structures. Mr. Ghazzalij 

699a,b. Special Problems (Credit variable). 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations under the direction of a 
member of the civil engineering faculty. Staff 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. 

701a, 702b. Research and Thesis. 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



Electrical Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor Pearson, Chairman; Professors Bourne, Burrus, de Figueiredo, 

W. E. Gordon, Leeds, T. W. Parks, Pfeiffer, Rabson, Tittel, and Troelstra 

Adjunct Professor Saltzberg 

Associate Professors J. W. Clark, Feustel, Glantz, Jump, 

Kim, and W. L. Wilson 

Adjunct Associate Professor P. M. Stevens 

Assistant Professors Hirschberg, D. H. Johnson, and Kazakos 

Adjunct Instructor Garcia 

Adjunct Lecturer Calfee 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.E.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Degrees. The first two years of the engineering pro- 
gram are described on pages 150-151. Students contemplating a major in- 
electrical engineering should take Mathematics 101, 102, 211, 212 (or the 
corresponding honors courses); Physics 101, 102, 132; Electrical Engineering 
220; Engineering 241; and three courses plus one laboratory chosen from 
Chemistry 101, 102, 107 and Physics 211, 212, 231. Other courses of interest 
are Engineering 101, 142, 200, and 211. Engineering 200 and 211 satisfy the 
B.S. requirement for an engineering science course from another engineering 
department. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
seeking the B.A. must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete 
no fewer than 60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for 
a total program of at least 130 semester hours. For the B.S., no fewer than 42 
semester hours outside departmental requirements for a total of 134 semester 
hours are required. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 and 51. 

The four-year program in electrical engineering leads to either the B.A. 
or the B.S. in Electrical Engineering. The B.S. program has more technical 
requirements and the degree is accredited by the Engineering Council on 
Professional Development, while the B.A. program allows more flexibility 
with electives. It is possible in either program to satisfy major requirements 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 161 

of two departments, but only a single degree may be received. Students may 
take a double major combining electrical engineering with physics, mathe- 
matics, economics, languages, or other disciplines. With satisfactory achieve- 
ment, students may qualify for a fifth year of study leading to the professional 
degree of Master of Electrical Engineering. This degree is also available, on a 
part-time or full-time basis, for students other than Rice undergraduates. 

Suggested programs and upper level requirements for the Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Electrical Engineering are available 
from the department. These programs are flexible and may be adjusted to suit 
individual interests and needs. 

Qualified students may, upon recommendation of the department and 
approval of the Graduate Council, enter a program leading directly to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy after completing the bachelor's degree. 

Graduate Degrees. Requirements of a general nature for advanced de- 
grees are outlined on pages 91-92. Students should consult departmental 
advisers for specific courses of study. 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree in the Electrical Engineering 
Department is required to complete an approved course of study. In addition, 
the candidate is required to complete an approved research program and 
submit an acceptable thesis. A semester or more of supervised teaching is 
required as a valuable part of graduate education. 

The granting of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy presupposes academic 
work of high quality and demonstrated ability to do independent and creative 
research. To be admitted to candidacy, the student must obtain high standing 
in an approved course program and perform satisfactorily on qualifying 
examinations. Normally the candidate completes the requirements for a 
master's degree as part of the Ph.D. program. The candidate must participate 
in a program of supervised teaching. Emphasis is placed on research leading 
to a satisfactory dissertation. Each candidate takes a final oral examination. 
The doctoral candidate should expect to devote a minimum of three academic 
years of graduate study in this program. 

Although a general program of study may be arranged and some attention 
is given to professional preparation in breadth, the program in electrical 
engineering may be described in terms of four major areas of concentration. 

Bioengineering 

Modern medicine and research in health-related sciences make increas- 
ing use of engineering methods and instrumentation. With proper selection of 
electives, the undergraduate program represents an excellent preparation for 
medical school. 

Two main research areas have been developed, namely: (1) cardio- 
pulmonary-renal systems and (2) neurophysiological systems. For a student 
interested in clinical applications, close cooperation with faculty at the Texas 
Medical Center in Houston is possible. At the graduate level, research will be 
generally in one of these two areas while courses are selected to ensure a sound 
engineering background and competence in several areas of the life sciences. 

Circuits, Control, and Communication Systems 

This specialization is composed of three sub-areas: (1) circuits and elec- 
tronics, (2) dynamics and control, and (3) information processing and com- 
munications. These are closely related and generally involve the study of 
systems of devices to process and communicate signals and information, 
rather than the study of the devices themselves. 



162 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Computer Science and Engineering 

This program is divided into the following three topics: (1) hardware 
engineering; (2) software engineering; and (3) discrete system modeling. 
Students selecting the computer science and engineering option must com- 
plete a broad program of courses from each of these areas. 

Lasers, Microwaves, and Solid-State Electronics 

This area of concentration permits undergraduate and graduate students 
to study and participate in several specialties, including laser fusion tech- 
nology, optical communication systems, application and development of 
tunable laser devices, semiconductor devices capable of very high frequency 
oscillations and large gain bandwidth modulation, sensitive and fast milli- 
meter and submillimeter detector devices that can be used in astronomy, 
bubble computer memories, and integrated optics and circuits. 

In addition to the regular graduate programs, there are four interdiscipli- 
nary graduate programs designed particularly for those who received their 
previous degree(s) in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or other sciences, in- 
cluding undergraduate engineering science programs, but who have become 
interested in the engineering applications appropriate to a particular field of 
science. These programs are systems theory, solid-state electronics and 
materials science, computer science, and bioengineering. 

Bioengineering 

Electrical Engineering Courses 

380a. Introduction to Medical Physiology and Biophysics I (3-0-3). 

An introductory course in physiology and biophysics stressing the analytical approach 
to the study of living systems. Mr. Clark. 

381b. Introduction to Medical Physiology and Biophysics II (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Electrical Engineering 380 covering primarily nervous system control of 
the internal environment of the body. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 380. Mr. Clark 

482b. Bioengineering Instrumentation and Techniques (3-3-4). 

A survey of components, instrumentation systems, and techniques related to bioengineer- 
ing and selected clinical problems. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 380, 381, and 342. 

Mr. Clark. Mr. Bourland 

580b. Mathematical Modeling of Physiological Systems: Techniques and 
Applications (4-0-4). 

An introduction to mathematical physiology that applies techniques in signal theory, 
control theory, and numerical analysis to a variety of physiological systems. Prerequisite: 
Electrical Engineering 380. 381, and 401. Mr. Clark 

581. Cardiovascular Dynamics (3-0-3).t 

587. Computers in Biomedicine (3-0-3).t 

Computer applications in processing clinical signals such as EEC and EKG: characteris- 
tics of computerized patient monitoring systems. Clinical engineering aspects and current 
research. 



Circuits, Control, and Communication Systems 

Electrical Engineering Courses 

301b. Network and Systems Theory (3-0-3). 

Network topology and differential equations; analysis of networks and systems based 
on state variable and Laplace transform descriptions; frequency domain properties; intro- 
duction to filter design. Prerequisite: Engineering 241. Mr. Johnaon 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 163 

331a,b. Introduction to Applied Probability (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the concepts, interpretations, elementary techniques, and applications 
of modern probability theory, including: a brief introduction to statistical inference. Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 102 or 103. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 381.M/-. Lutes, Mr. Pfeiffcr 

342a,b. Electronic Circuits (3-4-4). 

Models of transistors. FET's and vacuum tubes. Biasing methods: two-port analysis, single 
and multistage amplifiers, frequency domain characteristics, feedback, stability, oscillators, 
power amplifiers. Prerequisite: Engineering 241. Mr. Wilson, Mr. Leeds 

401a. Signals and Linear Systems (3-0-3). 

A unified study of signals and linear systems. Continuous-time and discrete-time analysis. 
Fourier, Laplace, and Z transforms. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 301, 342, Mathemat- 
ical Sciences 330. Mr. de Fiyueiredo 

403a. Electromechanical Systems (3-0-3). 

Magnetic circuits and transformers; energy and forces in electric and magnetic field 
systems; lumped parameter electromechanics; rotating machinery and transducers; dynamics 
and control of electromechanical systems. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 305. Offered 
alternate years. Mr. Leeds 

404. Electrical Power Systems (3-0-3).t 

Power transmission lines; representation of power systems, transient behavior of ma- 
chines: faults on power systems; control of power systems. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 
301. Mr. Leeds 

430b. Introduction to Communication Theory and Systems (3-0-3). 

Introduction to random processes. Baseband transmission. Analog and pulse code modula- 
tion. Communication systems design and operation concepts. Prerequisite: Electrical Engi- 
neering 331, 401. Mr. Johnson 

436b. Control Systems I (3-0-3). * ''' "^ ■' 

The representation, analysis, and design of simple control systems in the frequency domain. 
Nyquist, Bode diagrams, root locus. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 401. Mr. Pearson 

442a. Advanced Electronic Circuits (3-0-3). 

Electronic circuits used in communication and other systems including principles of feed- 
back, modulation, detection, and active filtering. Emphasis on design using integrated circuits. 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 342. Mr. Leeds 

501. Advanced Linear Systems (3-0-3).t " '" . . 

502b. Network Synthesis (3-0-3). 

The theoretical and practical aspects of network synthesis and filter design: realizability, 
one-port synthesis, approximation methods, two-port synthesis and filter design, and active 
filter synthesis. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 401. Offered alternate years. Mr. Burnis 

504. Introduction to Space Communications Systems (3-0-3).t 

530a. Advanced Communication Theory (3-0-3). 

Review of stochastic processes. Gaussian and Poisson processes. Statistical detection theory 
and digital communication techniques. Channel models. Estimation theory; application to 
waveform communications. Optimal receivers in communications systems. Prerequisite: 
Electrical Engineering 430. Mr. Johnson 

531a. Digital Filtering (3-0-3). 

Digital filtering and signal processing. Sampling, quantization, and signal representation, 
Z transform methods, recursive and nonrecursive filters, frequency and time domain 
approaches, the Fast Fourier Transform. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 401. A//-. Parks 

532b. Signal Theory (3-0-3). 

Finite dimensional signal representation, choice of exponentials — Prony, Pade methods. 
Spectral estimation-maximum entropy, maximum likelihood. Speech coding, separation of 
overlapping signals. Interpolation and extrapolation. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 
401. 531. Mr. Parks 

533b. Stochastic Processes (3-0-3). 

Mathematical foundations for advanced study of applied random processes. Topics such as 
separability and measurability: analytic properties of sample functions; linear transformation; 
independent increments; stochastic integrals. Prerequisite: Mathematical Science 482. Also 
offered as Mathematical Science 582. Mr. Pfeiffer 



164 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

535a. Information Theory (3-0-3). 

Introduction to information theory concepts. Measures of information. Noiseless coding. 
The discrete memoryless channel. Error bounds. Techniques of coding and decoding. Con- 
volutional codes. Source encoding. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 585. Ms. Kazakos 

536a. Control Systems II (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the theory of linear multivariable control systems. Realization theory, con- 
trollability, observability, stabilizability. Topics may include state estimation, compensation, 
decoupling, model matching, and tracking. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 436. 

Mr. Pearson 

538b. Detection Theory and Pattern Recognition (3-0-3). 

Statistical detection theory with applications to radar. Principles of statistical pattern 
recognition. Clustering and syntactic approaches to pattern recognition applications. Pre- 
requisite: Electrical Engineering 534. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 583. Ms. Kazakos 

694. Digital Communications (3-0-3).t 

695a. Seminar on Communication Networks (3-0-3). 

Statistical and queuing approaches to the design and performance analysis of communica- 
tion networks. Ms. Kazakon 

696b. Seminar in Digital Filtering (3-0-3). Mr. Burrus 

Computer Science and Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Courses 

220a,b. Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to programming in PL/1 for students in computer science 
and engineering. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 220. Mr. Feu.^tel. Mr. Holt 

221a,b. Digital Computing for the Humanities and Social Sciences (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to programming in APL and PL/1, with emphasis on 
problems from the humanities and social sciences. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 221. 

Ms. Blattner. Mr. Feustel. Mr. Holt 

222a,b. Introduction to Business Data Processing (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to programming in PL/1, with emphasis on business 
applications and problems. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 222. 

Mr. Feustel. Mr. Holt, Mr. Kennedy 

223a,b. Introduction to Computing (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to the computer solution of equations using APL and PL/1. 
Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 223. Mr. Davis, Mr. Feiuitel 

316a. Introduction to Discrete Structures (3-0-3). 

Set theory, relations mappings; algebraic systems such as semigroups, groups, rings, and 
fields; graph theory. Boolean algebra, and propositional logic. Also offered as Mathematical 
Sciences 316. Mr. Thrall 

320a,b. Computer Organization and Software (3-4-4). 

Basic computer architecture. System software, including loaders, assemblers and oper- 
ating systems. Advanced programming techniques. Micro-programming. Input-output. Also 
offered as Mathematical Sciences 320. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 220. Stajy 

321a,b. Advanced Programming (3-3-4). 

Advanced programming methods, including structured programming, team program- 
ming, data structures, searching and sorting, data management and information retrieval. 
Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 321. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 220. 

Ms. Blattner, Staff 

322a. Introduction to Management Information Systems (3-0-3). 

Basic concepts for development and implementation of computer-based management 
systems. Field assignments in local industry. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 222. Also 
offered as Mathematical Sciences 322. Mr. Campise 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 165 

326a,b. Digital Logic Design (3-3-4). 

Gates, flip-flops, combinational and sequential switching circuits, registers, data transfer 
circuits, logical and arithmetic operators. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 220. 

Mr. Jump. Staff 

416b. Automata and Formal Languages (3-0-3). 

Finite automata, regular expressions, regular languages, pushdown automata, context- 
free languages, Turing machines, recursive languages, computability and solvability. Pre- 
requisite: Electrical Engineering 316. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 416. M.s-. Bhittncr 

420b. Algorithms and Data Structures (3-3-4). 

The design and analysis of computer algorithms. Models of computation, data structures, 
and efficiency considerations. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 316, 321. Also offered as 
Mathematical Sciences 420. Mr. Huvchherg 

421a. Systems Programming (3-3-4). 

Introduction to the design and construction of important software systems programs in- 
cluding assemblers, compilers, and operating systems. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 
316, 320 and 321. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 421. Mr. Hirsrhberg 

423. Systems Simulation (2-3-3).t 

425b. Computer Systems (3-3-4). 

Memory utilization, storage management, addressing, control, and input-output. Compari- 
son of solutions to computer system design problems. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 320 
and 331. Staff 

426a. Digital System Design (3-3-4). 

Digital system organization, microprogrammed control units, bus architectures, micro- 
processors, memory organizations, and high speed arithmetic. Prerequisite: Electrical Engi- 
neering 320 and 326. Mr. Jump 

427a. Pulse and Digital Circuits (3-3-4). 

Oscillators, timing circuits, counters, bistable, monostable, and astable circuits. Diode 
gates and selection matrices. Trigger circuits and blocking oscillators. Emphasis on discrete 
component solid state technologv'. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 342. Mr. Ciiprus 

516. Theory of Parallel Computation and Concurrent Systems (3-0-3).t 

517. Topics in Automata Theory (3-0-3).t 

Topics may include algebraic structure of machines, Krohn-Rhodes decomposition, proba- 
bilistic automata, a-transducers, and tree automata. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 416 
or consent of instructor. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 517. M.s. Blattner 

518b. Analysis Techniques for Combinatorial Algorithms (3-0-3). 

Introduction to concepts of problem complexity and analysis of algorithms to find bounds 
on complexity. Reducibility among combinatorial problems and approximation algorithms for 
"hard" problems. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 416 and 420. Also offered as Mathemat- 
ical Sciences 518. Mr. Hir.schberg 

520a. Operating Systems (3-3-4). 

Operating systems as a resource manager: memory management including allocation, 
virtual memory, and sharing: scheduling: concurrent processes including process synchroniza- 
tion and communication, deadlocks: protection and file systems. Prerequisite: Electrical 
Engineering 331, 420, 421, 425. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 520. Mr. Feustel 

521b. Artificial Intelligence (3-3-4). 

Techniques for simulating intelligent behavior by machine: problem solving, game 
playing, pattern perception, theorem proving, semantic information processing, and automatic 
programming. Programming laboratory projects. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 420 
and Mathematical Sciences 381. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 521, Ms. Blattner 

523b. Compiler Construction (3-3-4). 

Advanced topics in the design of programming language compilers, including parsing, 
run-time storage management, code generation and optimization, error recovery. Prerequisite: 
Electrical Engineering 416 and 421. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 523. Staff 

524b. Operating System Components (1-6-3). 

A projects laboratory in operating systems. Laboratory on a minicomputer system done in 
teams. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 420 and 421. Mr. Feustel 



166 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

527b. Advanced Digital Components (3-0-3). 

Generation, distribution, and measurement of nanosecond pulses. Structure of high speed 
arithmetic units, especially pipe line form. Detailed analysis of particular high speed logic 
elements. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 427. Mr. Cyprus 

528a. Digital System Projects (1-6-3). 

Design projects involving the specification design, construction, and testing of micro- 
processor-based digital systems. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 425 and 426. ^Ifr. Jump 

623b. Syntactic and Semantic Elements of Programming Languages 

(3-3-4). 

Syntactic and meta-syntactic definition of languages. Semantic models and interpreters 
for languages. Fundamental elements and structures of programming languages and their 
implementation. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 623. Prerequisite: Electrical Engi- 
neering 523. Mr. Feuxtel 

698a, 699b. Seminar on Computer Science (1-0-1 each semester). Staff 

Lasers, Microwaves, and Solid-State Electronics 

Electrical Engineering Courses 

305a,b. Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (3-3-4). 

Distributed systems. Transmission lines. Smith Charts and impedance matching. Static 
and oscillatory fields. Ma.xwell's equations. Interaction of waves with media antennas. 

Mr. Tittel, Mr. Kim 
306b. Electromagnetic Field Theory (3-0-3). 

Electrostatic fields and boundary value problems. Magnetic fields and interaction with 
materials. Time dependent electromagnetic fields. Plane waves, waveguides, and resonators. 

Mr. Gordon 
308b. Acoustics (3-0-3). 

Acoustic theory, atmospheric acoustics, room acoustics, attenuation, nonlinear effects, 
measurement techniques, transducers, and acoustical standards. Also offered as Mechanical 
Engineering 378. Mr. Few 

362b. Quantum Electronic Devices (3-0-3). 

Lasers, optoelectronics, integrated optics, and semiconductors. Mr. Rab.^on 

459a. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3-4-4). 

Schroedinger's equation; harmonic oscillators: band theory of solids; hydrogen molecule; 
spins and angular momentum; interaction of matter with radiation: spectroscopy; scattering 
processes and nonlinear susceptibility: quantum statistics: transport phenomena. Mr. Kim 

461a. Electrical Properties of Materials (3-0-3). 

Properties and parameters of magnetic, dielectric, conducting, and semi-conducting 
materials important in the understanding of device characteristic. Corequisite: Electrical 
Engineering 459. Mr. Rab.'^on 

462b. Semiconductor Devices (3-4-4). 

Physical principles and operational characteristics of semiconductor devices. Prerequisite: 
Electrical Engineering 461. Mr. Wilson 

505a. Advanced Electromagnetic Field Theory (3-0-3). 

Boundary-value problems in electrostatics and magnetostatics. Propagation of electro- 
magnetic waves in free space, in conducting media, and in anistropic dielectrics. Mr. Tittel 

506. Applications of Electromagnetic Field Theory (3-0-3).t 

Wave guides and cavities, antennae, diffraction, holography, magnetohydrodynamics, and 
radiation from moving charges. Mr. Tittel 

560. Ferromagnetic Theory and Devices (3-0-3). f 

561. Electronic Conduction in Materials (3-0-3).t 

562a. Microwave Engineering (3-4-4). 

Waveguides and resonant cavities. Scattering matrix, applications to 2-, 3-. and 4-port 
devices. Broadband transformers, couplers, and filters. Microwave generation. Tensor suscep- 
tibility and nonreciprocal devices. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 306. Mr. Wilson 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 167 

563a. Introduction to the Solid State (3-0-3). 

Fundamental concepts about crystalline solids and basic preparation for further courses in 
the sequence Electrical Engineering 564-567. Also offered as Chemistry, Materials Science, 
and Physics 563a. Mr. Brotzen 

564b. Electron Transport and Superconductivity (3-0-3). 

Various aspects of electron transport including semiconductor junction theory. Pre- 
requisite: Electrical Engineering 563 or equivalent. Also listed as Materials Science and 
Physics 564. Mr. Doddx 

565. Dielectric and Optical Properties of Solids (3-0-3).t 

Static and dynamic models of dielectric media, dielectric dispersion, laser applications, 
nonlinear interactions between radiation and matter. Also offered as Chemistry, Materials 
Science, and Physics 565. Mr. Estle 

566. Imperfections and Mechanical Properties of Crystalline Solids (3-0-3).t 

The effect of lattice imperfections, such as point defects, dislocations, phonons, electrons, 
etc., upon the physical and mechanical properties of crystals. Mr. Robert.'i 

567b. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance (3-0-3). 

Magnetic properties of solids: diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, anti- 
ferromagnetism, and ferrimagnetism. Magnetic resonance: nuclear magnetic resonance, 
electron paramagnetic resonance, and ferromagnetic resonance. Prerequisite: Electrical 
Engineering 563 or equivalent. Also listed as Materials Science and Physics 567. Mr. Estle 

568b. Quantum Electronics Engineering (3-0-3). 

Quantum theory of optical lasers involving photon statistics and nonlinear spectroscopy. 
Generation of optical laser pulses. Light scattering experiments. Parametric interaction of 
radiation with the plasma medium. Mr. Kim 

591a. Optics (3-0-3). 

A one-semester survey covering important aspects of classical optical theory, wave 
properties of light, and the Fourier analysis approach to physical optics. Holography, inte- 
grated optics, and fiber optics. Mr. Tiftel 

592b. Topics in Quantum Optics (3-0-3). 

Latest developments in lasers, optical pumping, Raman and Brillouin spectroscopy, and 
mode locking. Mr. Rabson 

692. Advanced Topics in Microwave Engineering (l-O-l).t 

697. Seminar on Magnetics (3-0-3).t 



Research and Projects 



Electrical Engineering Courses 

490a,b. Electrical Engineering Projects (Credit variable). 
Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

590a,b. Electrical Engineering Projects (Credit variable). 
Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

690a,b. Research and Thesis (Credit variable). 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



168 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Environmental Science and Engineering 
The George R, Brown School of Engineering 

Professor C. H. Ward, Chairman; Professors Akers, Characklis, and Leeds 

Adjunct Professors Chambers and Stallones 

Associate Professor Few 

Adjunct Associate Professors Gesell, Pier, and Severs 

Assistant Professors Bedient and Tomson 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.E.E., M.E.S., M.S.. Ph.D. 

The Undergraduate Program. The major in environmental science 
(offered only as a double major with other fields of science or engineering), is 
intended for students wishing academic training oriented toward the solution 
of technical environmental problems, and leads to the B.A. degree. 

General requirements during the first two years include: two years of 
mathematics, two years of chemistry, and one year of physics. Specific courses 
to satisfy these requirements vary somewhat and should be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. For the B.A. degree, a minimum of 
twelve semester hours of environmental science and engineering courses are 
required during the junior and senior years. The undergraduate B.A. double 
major curriculum has been designed with maximum flexibility and minimum 
specific requirements to encourage interdepartmental study with all other 
fields of science and engineering. A list of suggested electives in various fields 
of science, engineering, humanities, and social science is available for students 
desiring additional guidance or specialization. 

The total number of semester hours required for the B.A. with a double 
major will depend on departmental requirements for the other major. 
Generally, however, in addition to the departmental requirements for the 
majors, students must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete 
no fewer than 60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a 
total program of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and 
Majors, pages 50 and 51. 

Undergraduates interested in environmental engineering should contact 
the Department of Civil Engineering for information on their B.S. degree 
program with an environmental option. 

The introductory course. Environmental Science 201, is intended for both 
majors and nonmajors. Humanities majors are encouraged to consider this 
course for science distribution requirements. 

Successful completion of the four-year curriculum leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts with environmental science as part of a double major qualifies the 
student for possible admission to a fifth year of specialized study leading to the 
degree of Master of Environmental Science. Completion of a four-year cur- 
riculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in any field of engineering (civil 
and chemical preferred) qualifies the student for possible admission to a fifth 
year of specialized study leading to the degree of Master of Environmental 
Engineering. These recognized professional degrees in the environmental 
field are differentiated on the basis of science or engineering orientation. Out- 
standing students wishing to pursue careers in teaching and research are 
qualified for graduate study after the B.A., B.S., M.E.S., or M.E.E. degrees. 

The Graduate Program. The graduate program in environmental 
science and environmental engineering are interdepartmental activities and 



ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 169 

lead to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Applicants for 
admission to the environmental science program may hold the baccalaureate 
or master's degree in any of the sciences or mathematics. Applicants for the 
environmental engineering program must hold accredited baccalaureate or 
master's degress in an area of engineering. Although the main research activi- 
ties in the department are concerned with water and wastewater engineering, 
water resource management, and applied water chemistry, the program 
serves as the focal point for university-wide study and research in the broad 
man-environment problem spectrum. Faculty members from the depart- 
ments of Chemical and Electrical Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Geol- 
ogy, Economics, and Psychology participate in this interdisciplinary research. 
Graduate students enrolled in any of these departments and interested in 
environmental problems for thesis topics may use facilities of the Environ- 
mental Science and Engineering Department and are eligible for financial 
assistance in the form of graduate traineeships. 

Candidates for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy may pursue 
course programs designed both to complement and supplement their back- 
grounds, through major and minor emphasis areas. However, formal minors 
are not required. University requirements for the advanced degrees are pre- 
sented on pages 91 and 92. 

Graduate students in environmental science or engineering take the ma- 
jority of their courses in other departments. A candidate for the Master of 
Science degree must complete a minimum of eight approved semester courses 
and present and defend, in oral examination, a research thesis. Normally two 
academic years and the intervening summer are required for the degree. 

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy must demonstrate their compe- 
tence in three areas through qualifying examinations. The areas of compe- 
tence may correspond to the candidate's areas of major and minor course 
emphasis. The thesis must document and be defensible evidence of the 
candidate's ability to do original research in a specialized phase of environ- 
mental science or engineering. 



Environmental Science and Engineering Courses 

201a. Introduction to Environmental Systems (3-3-4). 

The chemical, physical, and biological components of the environment and the effects of 
pollution on their maintenance and utilization. Mr. Ward 

311a. Applied Fluid Mechanics (3-3-4). 

Fundamental principals of fluid statics and fluid flow in closed conduits: laboratory exer- 
cises. Also offered as Civil Engineering 363. Mr. Bedient 

401a. Measurements in Environmental Systems (2-6-4). 

The various analytical and instrumental techniques for measurement of the physical and 
chemical properties of air and water. Mr. Tom^on 

402b. Laboratory Study of Environmental Processes (2-6-4). 

Unit process experiments demonstrate the use of natural and modulated water pollution 
control. Mr. Tomnon 

403a. Urban Water Systems (3-0-3). 

The municipal water cycle, including water supply, distributions, and consumption and 
wastewater collection, treatment, and disposal. Mr. Characklix 

405a. Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3-0-3). 

Human health effects; sources of air pollution. Properties and processes of the atmospheric 
medium; stability, turbulence, mixing, transport of pollutants, radiation, photochemistry, 
aerosol physics, and precipitation. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 479 and Chemical 
Engineering 427. Staff 



170 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

406b. Introduction to Environmental Law (3-0-3). 

The legal techniques used by societies to plan and regulate the use of environmental 
resources. Mr. Leeds 

412b. Hydrology and Watershed Analysis (3-3-4). 

Fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, hydrograph techniques, flood routing, and open 
channel flow; local watershed application. Also offered as Civil Engineering 464. Mr. Bedient 

443a. Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3-0-3). 

The fundamentals of meteorology and climatology, and predictive meteorology and clima- 
tology. Also offered as Space Physics 443 and Mechanical Engineering 477. Mr. Feir 

444b. Atmospheric Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Hydrodynamic equations of motion on a rotating planet will be derived and used to study 
meso-scale and macro-scale weather systems on the Earth and other planets. Also offered as 
Space Physics 444 and Mechanical Engineering 478. Mr. Few 

490b. Special Study and Research for Undergraduates (0-9-3). 

Open to environmental science or engineering majors with superior records and with per- 
mission of the chairman. Written thesis required. Staff 

511a, 512b. Environmental Physiology and Toxicology (3-0-3 each 

semester). 

The physical and chemical environment as it affects the physiology and population dyna- 
mics of organisms (including man). Stability and maintenance of biogeochemical cycles. Staff 

517a. Water Resource Systems (3-0-3). 

Theories of urban hydrology, stream pollution analysis, and water quality simulation. 

Mr. Bedient 

521, 522. Environmental Engineering Processes (3-0-3 each semester).! 

Design and control of industrial systems to satisfy water quality demands for cooling 
water and steam production. Corrosion, scaling, and fouling problems considered in depth. 

Mr. Charackli.^ 
528b. Air Pollution and Its Abatement (3-0-3). 

Atmospheric physics and chemistry of gaseous and particulate pollutants; relationship 
between emissions and air quality; engineering, economics, and politics of abatement. Also 
offered as Chemical Engineering 528. Mr. Deans 

536b. Microbial Engineering (3-0-3). 

The synthesis of water and waste water treatment systems. Biological processes as applied 
to industrial waste treatment. Mr. Charackliii 

545. Modeling in Design and Resource Management (3-0-3).t 

The use of models in design and resource management. Mr. Leeds 

550b. Applied Water Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Designed to provide a theoretical basis for considering the chemistry of natural and waste 
waters and treatment processes. Staff 

601a, 602b. Seminar (3-0-3 each semester). 
A continuing seminar on environmental research. 

621, 622. Experimental Design (3-0-3 each semester).! 

Analysis of variance and regression techniques. Emphasis on problem solving, primarily 
with chemical and biological data. Introduction to experimental design. Mr. CharackUs 

641a, 642b. Advanced Topics (3-0-3 each semester). 

Discussion and interpretation of current literature and research relevant to the environ- 
mental sciences in a seminar setting. Staff 

645a, 646b. Problems in Environmental Planning (3-0-3 each semester). 

An important current environmental problem will be studied by students functioning as 
members of a consulting panel. Staff 

651a, 652b. Research and Thesis (Credit variable). 
For the Master of Science. 

700c. Summer Research (Credit variable). 



ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 171 

751a, 752b. Research and Thesis for the Doctorate (Credit variable). 
800b. Degree Candidate Only. 

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor W. F. Walker, Choirnin)i 

Professors Beckmann, Bowen, Brotzen, Chapman, Cheatham, 

McLellan, Miele, J.M. Roberts, Wierum, and Wilhoit 

Assistant Professors Bayazitoglu and Picologlou 
Adjunct Assistant Professors Harkins and Krawitz 

Degree>^ Offered: B.A., B.S., M.M.E., M.M.S., M.S.. Ph.D. 

Requirements for baccalaureate, professional, and graduate degrees in 
mechanical engineering and in materials science are summarized on pages 
50, 92, and 95. A list of representative courses and their normal sequence during 
the student's undergraduate year is available from the department. By proper 
choice of electives in the senior and fifth years, the student can specialize in 
one of several options as part of the mechanical engineering degree programs: 
thermal sciences and energy conversion, gasdynamics, hydrodynamics and 
ocean engineering, stress analysis and mechanical behavior of materials, 
aerospace engineering, and air pollution. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
seeking the B.A. must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete 
no fewer than 60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for 
a total program of a least 135 semester hours. The B.S. degree program 
requires 42 semester hours outside departmental requirements and a total of 
134 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 and 51. 

After completing the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree or 
the Bachelor of Arts degree, the student is eligible to apply for the fifth-year 
program leading to the professional degrees Master of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing or Master of Materials Science. 

Graduate degrees within this department are the Master of Science and 
the Doctor of Philosophy. These degree programs are open to students who 
have demonstrated outstanding performance in their undergraduate studies. 
The general university requirements for these degrees are outlined on pages 
91-92. Specific course requirements are variable, depending upon prepara- 
tion, performance on qualifying examinations, etc. The granting of a graduate 
degree presupposes superior quality academic work and demonstrated ability 
to do original research. For both the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees, the thesis 
must be defended in public oral examination. 

The research interests of the faculty and the laboratory research equip- 
ment available provide the following areas of specialization: (1) engineering 
mechanics; (2) materials science; (3) fluid dynamics, gas dynamics, heat trans- 
fer, physical oceanography; (4) aero-astronautics; (5) bioengineering. 

Mechanical Engineering Course^! 

311a. Mechanics of Deformable Solids (3-0-3). Mr. Cheatham 

312b. Advanced Mechanics of Deformable Solids (3-0-3). Mr. Cheatham 



172 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

331a. Junior Laboratory I (0-3-1). 

Static and impact testing of engineering materials. Beam deflection and shear center 
experiments are included. Strain gages are applied and tested. Mr. Cheatham 

332b. Junior Laboratory II (0-3-1). 

Laboratory instruction in fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Mr. Wierum. Staff 

340a,b. Industrial Process Laboratory (0-3-1). 

A laboratory providing practical experience in and observation of selected industrial 
processes. Mr. Guidrii 

371a. Fluid Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Introduction to fluid statics and dynamics; the development of the fundamental equations 
and their solution for classical viscous flows and high Reynolds number flows. Mr. Walker 

372b. Fluid Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Mechanical Engineering 371 devoted to airfoil theory, lubrication, 
boundary layers, and turbulence. Mr. Pkologlou 

378b. Acoustics (3-0-3). 

Acoustic theory, atmospheric acoustics, room acoustics, attenuation, nonlinear effects, 
measurement techniques, transducers, and acoustical standards. Also offered as Electrical 
Engineering .308. Mr. Few 

402b. Mechanical Engineering Design (2-3-3). 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 311 or equivalent. Mr. Cheatham 

411a. Advanced Engineering Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Application of energy methods in the study of particle and rigid-body dynamics, electric 
circuits, electro-mechanical systems, and continuous dynamic systems. Prerequisite: Engi- 
neering 211. M>'- Cheatham 

412b. Vibrations (3-0-3). 

Analysis of discrete and continuous linear, mechanical, vibrating systems with particular 
emphasis upon multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Approximate methods are included. Pre- 
requisite: Mechanical Engineering 411. Staff 

431a. Senior Laboratory I (0-3-1). 

Laboratory instruction in gasdynamics, heat transfer, applied thermodynamics, and 
engine cycles." Mr. Wierum, Staff 

432b. Senior Laboratory II (0-3-1). 

An independent laboratory design, performance of research project of the student's choice. 

Mr. Wilhoit 
434b. Laboratory Project (0-9-3). 

A course designed for students who wish to pursue a special mechanical engineering design 
or laboratory project. Staff 

463a. Minimization of Functions (3-0-3). 

Theory of maxima and minima. Analytical methods. Numerical methods. Also offered as 
Mathematical Sciences 463. Mr. Miele 

464b. Minimization of Functionals (3-0-3). 

Optimal control theory. Calculus of varitions. Analytical methods. Numerical methods. 
Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 464. Mr. Miele 

471b. Applications of Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Applications of thermodynamics to various systems of interest in mechanical engineering 
with particular attention to energy conversion, refrigeration, and psychrometrics. 

Mr. Chapman 

475a. Modeling and Model Testing (3-0-3). 

Modeling laws for different flow phenomena are derived and accuracy of test data is 
established. Mr. Beckmann 

476b. Fluid Machinery (3-0-3). 

Emphasis on continuous flow mechanism, such as turbines and ship propellers, etc. 

Mr. Beckmann 

477. Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3-0-3).t 

Fundamentals of meteorology and climatology including radiation transfer. Mr. Few 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 173 

478. Atmospheric Dynamics (3-0-3).t 

The hydrodynamic equations of motion on a rotating: planet will be derived and solutions 
demonstrated for static, stable, perturbed, and unstable flows. Mr. Fcir 

479a. Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3-0-3). 

Human health effects; sources of air pollution. Properties and processes of the atmospheric 
medium: stability, turbulence, mixing, transport of pollutants, radiation, photochemistry, 
aerosol physics, and precipitation. Also offered as Environmental Science and Engineering 405 
and Chemical Engineering 427. Mr. Far 

481a. Heat Transfer (4-0-4). 

A general study of the principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation 
and their application to problems of engineering practice. Mr. Chap))ian 

482. Thermal Environmental Engineering (3-0-3).t 

508. Perturbation Methods (3-0-3).t 

Appro.ximate solutions of nonlinear equations using perturbation techniques. Mr. Wilhoit 

511a. Elements of Continuum Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

A presentation of the concepts and general principles common to all branches of solid and 
fluid mechanics. Applications include non-Newtonian fluid mechanics and nonlinear 
elasticity. Mr. Bowen 

512. Elements of Continuum Mechanics II (3-0-3).t 

Applications of the concepts developed in Mechanical Engineering 511. Topics selected 
from thermoelasticity, electroelasticity, viscoelasticity, nonequilibrium thermodynamics, and 
porous media theories. Mr. Boivcn 

513b. Theory of Elasticity (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of linear elasticity and thermoelasticity. Applications include static and 
dynamic problems. Prerequisite: A first course in the mechanics of deformable bodies. 

Mr. Wilhoit 
514a. Theoretical Plasticity (3-0-3). 

Isotropic and anistropic plastic flow; yield and loading surfaces, normality and convexity 
requirement, and hardening rules; plane plastic flow problems and slip-line field theory. Also 
offered as Civil Engineering 514. Mr. Cheatham 

515b. Applied Plasticity (3-0-3). 

Problems in limit analysis and design; plastic behavior of structures; flexure and torsion of 
prismatic members. Mr. Merwin 

516. Advanced Dynamics (3-0-3).t 

Dynamics of a particle and systems of particles. 

517a. Finite Element Methods in Engineering (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the finite element analysis with applications to problems in fluid and 
solid mechanics. , Mr. Picologlou 

521. Flight Mechanics (3-0-3).t 

General principles of kinematics and aerodynamics necessary for the derivation of the 
equations of motion for rocket and jet powered vehicles. Mr. Wierum 

530a. Heat Exchanger Design (3-0-3). 

Description and calculation of various types of present day heat exchangers. 

M/'.s'. Bamzitoalu 
531b. Solar Power (3-0-3). 

Solar Collector design and performance — heat storage systems and power production. 

Mr.'i. Baijazitoglu 
563a. Minimization of Functions (3-0-3). 

Same as Mechanical Engineering 463, with one exception: emphasis is placed on computer 
methods. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 563. Mr. Miele 

564b. Minimization of Functionals (3-0-3). 

Same as Mechanical Engineering 464. with one exception: emphasis is placed on computer 
methods. Also offered as Mathematicsl Sciences 564. Mr. Miele 

571a. Ocean Fluid Dynamics and Meteorology I (3-0-3). 

An introductory course on the fundamentals of ocean motion. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Engineering 371, Chemical Engineering 401, or Civil Engineering 463. Mr. Beckmann 



174 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

572b. Structural Ocean Engineering (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Meciianical Engineering 571 with applications to the static and 
dynamic response of structures. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 571. Mr. Beckmann 

575. Energy Technology (3-0-3).t 

Energy utilization patterns and resources; conventional conversion systems, central 
station power from fossil fuels; power plant design; alternative fuels; nuclear fission and 
fusion; energy conversion systems. 

576. Propulsion (3-0-3).t 

Basic principles of gasdynamics, thermodynamics, and chemistry applied to prediction of 
the behavior of airbreathing and rocket propulsion devices. Mj: Wierum 

578b. Combustion (3-0-3). 

A study of physical and chemical processes of combustion and application to mobile and 
stationary systems. Mr. Wienim 

584b. Biomechanics and Fluid Mechanics of Physiological Systems (3-0-3). 

Topics include flow situations in living organisms; blood flow in capillaries, arterioles and 
arteries; flow in the urinary, gastrointestinal and reproductive tract, etc. Prerequisite: A first 
undergraduate course in fluid mechanics. Mr. Picologlou 

591a. Gasdynamics (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of compressible, one-dimensional gas flows with area change, normal 
shocks, friction, and heat addition; oblique shocks and Prandtl-Meyer flows. Mr. Wierum 

592b. Advanced Gasdynamics (3-0-3). 

Principles of one-dimensional unsteady and two-dimensional steady gasdynamics applied 
to the study of aerodynamics and physical acoustics. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 
591. Mr. Wierum 

593a,b. Mechanical Engineering Problems (Credit variable). 

With approval, mechanical engineering students may elect at least nine hours a week in 
approved investigation or design under the direction of a member of the staff. Staff 

594a. Advanced Aerodynamics (3-0-3). 

Application of engineering principles and aerodynamic theory to the design and analysis of 
flight vehicles. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 591. Mr. Wierum 

600a,b. Research and Thesis (Credit variable). Staff 

601a,b; 602a,b; 603a,b; 604a,b; 605a,b. Special Topics (Credit variable). 

Staff 
617, 618. Continuum Mechanics I, II (3-0-3 each semester).! 
Advanced topics in continuum mechanics. 

626. Theory of Elasticity II (3-0-3).t 

Special topics in the linear theory of elasticity. 

627b. General Theory of Shells (3-0-3). 

General linear theory of bending of elastic shells of arbitrary shape. Solution of problems of 
technical interest by exact and approximate methods. Mr. Cheatham 

671, 672. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics I, II (3-0-3 each semester).! 

Foundations of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Mr. Bowen 

673a, 674b. Advanced Fluid Mechanics I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Conservation equations for viscous compressible fluids. Applications to viscous and 
inviscid flows. Simple flows of non-Newtonian fluids. Mr. Walker 

675. Special Applications of Fluid Dynamics (3-0-3).t 

Geostropic flows in meteorology and oceanography investigated and applied to secondary 
flow phenomena of laminar and turbulent character. 

682. Convective Heat Transfer (3-0-3).t 

A vigorous study of the transfer of heat by free and forced convection. Mm. Bayazitogiu 

683a. Radiative Heat Transfer I (3-0-3). 

A rigorous study of the transfer of heat by radiant exchange in the absence of absorbing 
media. Mr. Chapman 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 175 

684. Radiative Heat Transfer II (3-0-3).t 

Radiative transfer in the presence of absorbing, emitting, and scattering media; combined 
radiation, conduction, and convection. Heat transfer in furnaces, fire propagation, and air 
pollution problems. 

685b. Conduction Heat Transfer (3-0-3). 

Formulation of steady, unsteady, and multidimensional conduction in different geometries. 

Mrs. Bayazitoglu 

697. Hypersonic Gasdynamics (3-0-3).t 

698. Physical Gasdynamics (3-0-3).t 

Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena in the dynamics of high temperature gases. 

Mr. Wienim 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 



Materials Science Couri^es 

245a. Thermodynamics of Engineering Materials (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the kinetics and thermodynamics of engineering materials. 

Mr. McLellan 

295. Introduction to Materials Technology Design (2-3-3).t 

An introductory project course utilizing the scanning electron microscope and other 
analytical tools to explore the nature of metallic, ceramic, polymeric and other materials. 

395a,b. Materials Science (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the science of solid materials covering metals, ceramics, plastics, and semi- 
conductors. The properties of solid materials from atomic and macroscopic points of view. 

Mr. Brotzen. Mr. McLellan 

397a,b. Materials Science Laboratory (0-3-1). 

An introductory laboratory course composed of experiments which complement the 
lecture material of Materials Science 395. Mr. Robert.^, Mr. McLellan 

401a. Thermodynamics and Transformations in Alloys (3-0-3). 

Thermodynamics applied to systems of solid solutions and intermetallic compounds. Phase 
law and phase equilibrium. Determining free energies in binary systems. Simple models for 
transformations. Mr. McLellan 

402a. Mechanical Properties of Materials (3-0-3). 

Basic, fundamental properties of dislocations in crystals. Applications to mechanical 
behavior: creep, work hardening, internal friction, fracture, and other structure sensitive 
phenomena of materials. Mr. Roberts 

404b. Materials Engineering and Design (2-3-4). 

The technological aspects of materials selection, design, failure and analysis. Laboratory 
time is spent in an industrial setting. Mr. Roberts 

406b. Physical Properties of Solids (3-0-3). 

A survey of electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of metals, semiconductors, and 
dielectrics based upon elementary band theory concepts. Mr. Brotzen 

411b. Metallography and Phase Relations (3-0-3). 

Microstructures which may be observed in metals and alloys; optical metallography in 
addition to more sophisticated techniques. Staff 

415. Ceramics and Glasses (3-0-3).t 

Fundamentals of ceramic and glassy materials including phase relations, theoretical 
properties, structure, and bonding. Staff 

453b. Extractive and Chemical Metallurgy (3-0-3). 

Survey of nonclassical benefication, reduction, oxidation, and refining processes for the 
preparation of research and reactor grade metals. Mr. Harkins 

502b. Imperfections in Solids (3-0-3). 

Point, line, and planar defects in ionic, homopolar, and metallic solids. Mr. Roberts 



176 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

535a. Introduction to X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microscopy (3-0-3). 

The study of crystals by x-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy. 
Basic diffraction theory and methods for characterization of structure and constitution of 
materials. Mr. Knticitz 

537a. X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microscopy Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Selected laboratory experiments to complement the lecture material of Materials Science 
535. Staff 

541b. Physical Metallurgy (3-0-3). 

The fundamentals of solidification, alloying, and heat treatment. The mechanical and non- 
mechanical properties of metallic systems from atomic and electronic theory. 

Mr. RoberU, Mr. Brotzen 

543b. Physical Metallurgy Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Laboratory experiments to complement the course work of Materials Science 541. 

Mr. Robert.'i 
545. Applied Physical Metallurgy (3-0-3).t 

Materials processing. Casting and welding of metallic materials, from a fundamental point 
of view. Nondestructive testing by ultrasonic, magnetic, and other techniques. Staff 

561a, 562b. Advanced Metallurgical Laboratory I, II (0-4-1 each semester). 

Students whose interest lies primarily in the field of materials and metallurgy are given 

the opportunity for research in these fields. Staff 

563a. Introduction to the Solid State (3-0-3). 

Fundamental concepts about crystalline solids, preparation for further courses in the 
sequence Materials Science 564-567. Prerequisite: introductory background in wave mechan- 
ics and statistical mechanics, enrollment in a graduate level quantum mechanics course. Also 
offered as Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, and Physics 563. Mr. Brotzen 

564b. Electron Transport in Solids and Superconductivity (3-0-3). 

Various aspects of electron transport, primarily from a microscopic viewpoint. Pre- 
requisite: Materials Science 563 or equivalent. Also offered as Chemistry, Electrical Engi- 
neering, and Physics 564. Mr. Dodds 

565. Dielectric and Optical Properties of Matter (3-0-3).t 

Polarization and the static model of a dielectric medium in an electric field; extension of 
the above model to the dynamic case and dielectric dispersion in solids. Mr.Estle 

566. Imperfections and Mechanical Properties of Crystalline Solids 

(3-0-3).t 

Point defects in crystals, geometrical description of dislocations and the mathematical 
theory of lattice imperfections. Mr. Robert.'^ 

567b. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance (3-0-3). 

Magnetic properties of solids. Diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, anti- 
ferromagnetism, and ferrimagnetism. Nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic 
resonance and ferromagnetic resonance. Also offered as Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, 
and Physics 567. Mr. Rorschach 

569b. Corrosion Science and Engineering (3-0-3). 

A survey of surface activity and corrosion processes on metals, semiconductors, and 
insulating materials. Mr. Harkins 

593a, 594b. Polymer Science and Engineering I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Basic concepts in macromolecular chemistry and physics, and their application in the 
production, processing, and use of synthetic polymers. Also offered as Chemical Engineering 
593, 594. Mr. Armeniade.'i 

604b. Defect Structure of Synthetic and Biological Polymers (3-0-3). 

Theory of disclinations in solids. Application of the theory to organic polymers, liquid and 
Mobias crystals, and insect muscle. Mr. Roberts 

609b. Fracture Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Theory of elasticity and theory of plasticity pertinent to fracture mechanics. Mr. Brotzen 

615a,b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

Detailed course offering will be based upon graduate student interest. Staff 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 177 

634a. Thermodynamics of Alloys (3-0-3). 

Relation between classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics applied to under- 
standing solid and liquid alloys. Solid-solid, liquid-solid, and gas-solid equilibria in metallurgy. 

Mr. Mc Leila >, 
635b. Transformations in Alloys (3-0-3). 

Diffusion in metals and alloys. Mechanism and phenomenology of diffusion-controlled 
transformations. Precipitation from saturated alloys and liquid solutions. Transformations in 
heat treated alloys. Mr. McLellan 

636. Diffraction of Nonideal Crystals (3-3-4).t 

Advanced x-ray diffraction theory and experimental methods. Applications include 
crystal structure determination, order-disorder, thermal vibration, mechanical deformation, 
structure of amorphous materials, and others. 

646a. Mechanical Metallurgy (3-0-3). 

Elastic, plastic, and viscous behavior of metallic and nonmetallic solids. The interpretation 
of mechanical behavior in terms of lattice-imperfection theory. Prerequisite: Materials Science 
402 or 566. Mr. Robertt^ 

649. Ferromagnetic Theory and Devices (3-0-3). t 

Theory of magnetism. Magnetostatics. Dynamic behavior of magnetic materials. Magnetic 
thin films. Magnetic tape cores. Device characteristics. Prerequisite: an introductory course in 
solid-state theory. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 560. 



English 



Professor Isle, Chairman 

Professors Dowden, Grob, Meixner, Minter, Parish, Patten, Piper, 

Spears, and J. A. Ward 

Visiting Professor Schneidau 

Associate Professors Apple, S. A. Baker, Doody, Doughtie, Huston, 

Morris, and Nitzsche 

Assistant Professors Driskill and Skura 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Requirements for a Major in English. A major in English requires 
thirty-six semester hours in English (twelve courses); at least twenty-four 
semester hours (twelve courses) must be courses at or above the 300 level. A 
double major requires thirty semester hours (ten courses) in English, with at 
least eighteen hours (six courses) at the advanced level. All English majors 
must take Masters of English Literature (English 251, 252) as a preparatory 
survey. 

An English major must also take avdanced courses in the following 
categories: (1) six semester hours (two courses) in English literature before 
1800, of which one course must be Chaucer, Shakespeare, or Milton; (2) three 
semester hours (one course) in English literature after 1800; (3) three semester 
hours (one course) in American literature. 

It is recommended that all English majors take some formal instruction in 
English and American history, and, especially if they plan to do graduate 
work, at least six semester hours (two courses) at the advanced level in Latin, 
German, or French. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 
60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program 
of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 



178 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. Though no students 
are admitted who seek a terminal M.A. degree, Ph.D. candidates may take the 
master's degree if they wish. They are expected to pass at least twenty-four 
semester hours in English in addition to "Introduction to Graduate Study: 
Bibliography and Criticism" on a pass-fail basis, satisfactorily complete a 
thesis (of approximately fifty pages), and defend the thesis in an oral examina- 
tion. The foreign language requirement is to be satisfied either by the passing 
of a reading test or by the successful completion of one literature course (at 
least three semester hours) offered by a foreign language department at Rice 
or another accredited institution. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. A candidate for 
the doctoral degree must successfully complete (or have completed before 
enrolling) six semester hours in the literature of a foreign language at the 
junior or senior level. The courses may be taken at Rice or another accredited 
institution and must be approved by the departmental graduate committee; if 
possible, the courses should directly relate to the student's period of specializa- 
tion in English or American literature. 

The student must complete a minimum of thirty-six semester hours in 
English. "Introduction to Graduate Study: Bibliography and Criticism" is the 
only course required of all new students. 

Usually in the beginning of the sixth semester students take the prelimi- 
nary examination, which consists of three three-hour examinations in fields 
other than that in which they choose to write their dissertations, and one four- 
hour examination in the field of specialization. A student with adequate course 
coverage may take a more specialized preliminary examination: a six-hour 
examination in a field of specialization and three-hour examinations in (1) a 
literary genre and (2) either a major writer or a related field outside of 
literature. 

The remaining requirements are the completion of a dissertation (pf 
approximately 150 pages) which demonstrates the candidate's capacity for 
independent work in either traditional scholarship or critical interpretation, 
and the passing of a final oral examination on the thesis and related fields. To 
receive continuing financial aid, a student must have candidacy for the Ph.D. 
approved by the beginning of the seventh semester of graduate work at Rice. 
To secure such approval, the student must have completed three require- 
ments: (1) foreign language courses, (2) preliminary qualifying examinations, 
(3) prospectus for dissertation, prepared in consultation with the prospective 
director and approved by the departmental graduate committee. 

English Courses 

101a. Critical Reading and Writing (3-0-3). 

Analysis and discussion of literary texts: poetry, drama, prose fiction. Students submit 
frequent essays. Staff 

102b. Critical Reading and Writing (3-0-3). 

Continuation of English 101, with sections giving special emphasis to individual genres: 
fiction, drama, and poetry. Staff 

103a, 104b. Basic Composition (3-0-3 each semester). 

Intended primarily for students whose English Competency Examination is below 
standard. Ms. DriskUl 

231a. European Drama to 1880 (3-0-3). 

Readings of major plays from ancient drama and from the English and French stage prior 
to 1880. Includes Aeschylus, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Moliere. 

Mr. Baker 



ENGLISH 179 

232b. European and American Drama: 1880 to the Present (3-0-3). 

Readings from major playwrights of the modern era. including Chekhov, Ibsen, Shaw, 
Brecht, Giraudoux, Anouilh. Pirandello, O'Neill, Beckett, Miller, and Albee. Mr. Baker 

241a. Modern and Ancient Narrative in Prose, Verse, and Drama (3-0-3). 

World narrative (Homer to The Aeneid): reading in modern English versions of The 
Iliad. The Odys^eii. The Aeueid. and representative Greek plays. Mr. Hu.'<to» 

242b. Modern and Ancient Narrative in Prose, Verse, and Drama (3-0-3). 

A survey of modern fictional narrative. This course provides an introduction to the origin 
and development of English and Continental fiction. Mr. Apple 

245. Humor and Satire (3-0-3).t 

251a. Masters of English Literature (3-0-3). 

Readings in the major authors representative of the various periods (from Chaucer through 
Pope). Mr. Baker 

252b. Masters of EngHsh Literature (3-0-3). 

Representative works by the major English authors of the Romantic and Victorian Periods 
and of the twentieth century. Lectures and discussion. Mr. Grob 

271a, 272b. Aspects of Modern Literature (3-0-3 each semester). 

Formal and historical modernist literature in short story, drama, poetry, novel, and non- 
fiction, drawn from American, British, and European sources of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Mr. Doody. Mr. hie 

304b. Images of Women in Literature (3-0-3). M.s. Nitzi^ehe 

305, 306. Studies in a Major Writer (3-0-3 each semester).t 

307a. Science Fiction (3-0-3). 

A study of modern science fiction in its relation to fantasy and satire. Mr. Speari^ 

308b. Detective Fiction (3-0-3). , Mr. Hmton 

321a. Approaches to Modern Drama (3-0-3). 

Ibsen and the well-made play; revivals of drama in Great Britain, Russia, and America. 

Mr. Meixner 
322b. Approaches to Modern Drama (3-0-3). 

Strindberg; O'Neill, Williams, and Miller; French moderns; absurdism and recent trends. 

M.S'. Skura 

324. Modern British Poetry (3-0-3).t 

Survey from 1890 to the present; emphasis on Hopkins, Yeats, Lawrence, Graves, Auden, 
Larkins, and Hughes; opportunity for papers and reports on other poets. Mr. Spears: 

325. Conrad and His Contemporaries (3-0-3).t 

Conrad's major works and selected novels of Hardy and Ford. Mr. Dowden 

326b. Twentieth-Century British Novels (3-0-3). 

Novels by D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bowen, Doris Lessing, 
and others. Class discussion. Examination, by way of lecture, of James Joyce's Ulys^sen. 

Mr. Meixner 
327. Twentieth-Century Irish Literature (3-0-3).t 

331a, 332b. Fiction Writing (3-0-3). Mr. Apple 

333b. Expository Writing (3-0-3). 

Permission of instructor. Mr. Piper 

336. Technical Writing (3-0-3).t 

338b. Poetry Writing (3-0-3). Mr. Meixner 

341. The English Novel in the Eighteenth Century (3-0-3).t 

A study of the early development of the novel. 

342b. The English Novel in the Nineteenth Century (3-0-3). 

From Austen to Hardy. Mr. Patten 

351a. The Romantic Period (3-0-3). 

Blake, Wordsworth, and Coleridge. Mr. Doivden 



180 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

352b. The Romantic Period (3-0-3). 

Byron, Keats, and Shelley. Mr. Dowden 

355. Victorian Literature {3-0-3).t 

356b. Victorian Literature (3-0-3). 

Poetry and nonfiction prose. Mr. Grob 

358b. Late Nineteenth-Century and Early Twentieth-Century English 
Literature (3-0-3).t Mr. Morris 

360. Restoration Literature (3-0-3).t 

365a. The Eighteenth Century (3-0-3). 

A study of Pope, Swift, Johnson, and other writers who practiced literature as a form of 
public address. Mr. Piper 

369a. Survey of Sixteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

A survey of nondramatic literature. Mr. Doughtie 

370. Spenser's Faerie Queene (3-0-3).t 

371. The English Lyric before 1700 (3-0-3).t 

372. Ballad and Folk Song (3-0-3).t 

British and American ballads and folk songs and their social implications. Mr. Doughtie 

373a. The Bible and Literature (3-0-3). Mr. Schneidau 

375a, 376b. Shakespeare (3-0-3 each semester). 

Selected representative plays including tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances. 

Mr. Grob, Mr. Hmton 
377b. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3-0-3). 

Close critical reading of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays with particular emphasis on the 
works of Marlow and Jonson. M.s. Skura 

381a. Literature of the Later Renaissance (3-0-3). 

After brief consideration of the sonnets of Sidney. Spenser, and Shakespeare, chief focus 
is on Herrick, Donne, Herbert, Carew, Waller, and Marvell. Mr. Pari-th 

382b. Milton and the Classical Tradition (3-0-3). Mr. Parish 

385a. Chaucer (3-0-3). Ms. Nitzsche 

386. Middle English Literature (3-0-3).t 

389a. American Literature to 1860 (3-0-3). Mr. Minter 

390b. American Literature 1860-1910 (3-0-3). 

A study of Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson, Stephen Crane, and others, but especially 
Henry James. Mr. Ward 

391a. American Fiction 1910-1940 (3-0-3). Mr. Ward 

392b. American Fiction 1940 to the Present (3-0-3). 

Survey with emphasis on the work of Bellow, Mailer, Barth, Pynchon, and others. Narra- 
tive technique and social context provide two approaches to the literature. Mr. hie 

393a. American Poetry Since 1915 (3-0-3). 

A study of Frost, Pound, Eliot, and Stevens with some attention to the other poets of the 
twentieth century. Mr. Isle 

395. Literature of American Ethnic Minorities (3-0-3).t 

397. History of Literary Criticism to 1900 (3-0-3).t 

398. History of Literary Criticism Since 1900 (3-0-3).t 

402a. Critical Approaches to Literature (3-0-3). Mr. Morris 

409a, 410b. The Teaching of Basic Composition (3-0-3 each semester). 

Open only to students who are proctoring in English 103 and 104. Ms. Driskill 



■>■'■■■ ENGLISH 181 

432. Advanced Creative Writing (3-0-3).t 

Prerequisite: English 331 or permission of instructor. 

440. History of the English Language (3-0-3).t 

451. Literary Types (3-0-3).t 

452b. Literary Types: Theory of the Novel (3-0-3). Mr. Me 

455. Shakespeare: Major Plays (3-0-3).t 

461. Modern Literature (3-0-3).t 

462b. Modern Literature: Recent American Poetry (3-0-3). Mr. Spear.^ 

481a, 482b. Directed Reading (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

491a, 492b. Senior Thesis (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

501a, 502b. Topics in English and American Literary History (Credit 
variable). 

Graduate research and thesis for the degree of Master of Arts. Staff 

503a. Introduction to Graduate Study (3-0-3). 

Designed to acquaint students with bibliographical guides, aids to research, and methods 
of preparing scholarly papers. Mr. Morrin. Mr. Patten 

504. Pro-Seminar in Middle English Literature (3-0-3).t 

505. Pro-Seminar in Renaissance Non-Dramatic Literature (3-0-3).t 
507. Pro-Seminar in Renaissance Dramatic Literature (3-0-3).t 

510. Pro-Seminar in the Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature 

(3-0-3).t 
512. Pro-Seminar in Romantic Literature (3-0-3).t 
515. Pro-Seminar in Victorian Literature (3-0-3).t 
517. Pro-Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Literature (3-0-3).t 
520. Pro-Seminar in American Literature to 1900 (3-0-3).t 
522. Pro-Seminar in Twentieth-Century American Literature (3-0-3).t 
525. Pro-Seminar in Literary Criticism (3-0-3).t 

541a. Old English (3-0-3). > ■■ ■ Ms. Nitzsche 

542. Old English: Beowulf {2,-0-2,).^ 

551. Seminar in Middle English Literature (3-0-3).t " ' ' 

553. Seminar in Sixteenth-Century Literature: Spenser (3-0-3).t 

554b. Seminar in Renaissance Non-Dramatic Literature: Shakespeare's 
Sonnets (3-0-3). Mr. Piper 

555. Seminar in Renaissance Drama, Excluding Shakespeare (3-0-3).t 

556a. Seminar in Shakespeare (3-0-3). Ms. Skura 

560. Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature, 
Excluding Fiction (3-0-3).t 

561. Seminar in the Eighteenth-Century Novel (3-0-3).t 
563. Seminar in Romantic Literature (3-0-3).t 

565. Seminar in Victorian Literature, Excluding Fiction (3-0-3).t 

566a. Seminar in the Victorian Novel: Dickens (3-0-3). Mr. Patten 



182 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

568b. Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Novel: Conrad (3-0-3). 

Mr. Dowden 

569. Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Poetry (3-0-3).t 

570b. Seminar in American Literature to 1900 (3-0-3). Mr. Ward 

572. Seminar in Modern American Poetry (3-0-3).t 

573. Seminar in Modern American Fiction (3-0-3).t 

574. Seminar in Modern Drama (3-0-3).t 

575a. Seminar in Literary Criticism: Post-Structuralist Criticism (3-0-3). 

Mr. Schneidau 

576b. Seminar in the Theory of Language: From Plato to Derrida (3-0-3). 

Mr. Morris 

577a. Seminar in Literary Types: Psychological Approaches (3-0-3). 

Mr. Spears 

581a, 582b. Directed Reading in English and American Literature (3-0-3 

each semester). Staff 

591a, 592b. The Teaching of Literature (0-0-1 each semester). Mr. Doody, Staff 

593a, 594b. The Teaching of Composition (1-0-1 each semester). Ms. DriskUl 

601a, 602b. Topics in English and American Literary History (Credit 
variable). 

Graduate research and thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Staff 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 



French and Italian 



Professor Raaphorst, Chairman; Professors P. Brady, 

Lecuyer, and Topazio 

Associate Professors Alcover and Carrington 

Assistant Professors Aresu and D.H. Nelson 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

French 

Undergraduates may major in French, and there is a graduate program 
in French leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. A 
fully equipped language laboratory is in operation, and laboratory work is an 
important part of the elementary courses in French. 

Undergraduate Majors. A minimum of thirty semester hours (ten 
courses) in advanced French courses is required for the major in French. How- 
ever, only twenty-four semester hours (eight courses) of advanced study are 
required for double majors or area majors. The following courses are required 
unless the student is exempted by his or her major adviser: French 311, 312, 
390, and 391. Students who have taken French 300-400 level courses cannot 
enroll simultaneously or afterwards in French 200-level courses for credit. 

Students are urged to take some work in European history, English, 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN 183 

another European literature, or other courses closely related to French litera- 
ture and culture. All majors and prospective majors must have their programs 
approved by a representative of the department. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 
60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program 
of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

The French Department offers various courses conducted entirely in 
English which do not count toward a major in French or a double teaching 
major. These are French 303, 304, 315, and 316. They may be accepted for an 
area major when approved by the departments involved. 

An honors program in French is available to qualified students. French 
majors who have taken French 311 and 312 in their freshman or sophomore 
years are eligible to apply for admission to the program. For detailed informa- 
tion they should consult their French instructor or the departmental adviser. 
A $1,500 summer travel scholarship is presented to a Rice student each year 
by the Alliance Francaise. The Rice chapter of Pi Delta Phi, the national 
French honor society, maintains a file of information about jobs abroad, both 
summer and permanent positions. Members of the department are available 
for discussion of the numerous programs of study and travel in France spon- 
sored by both American and French institutions. 

Graduate Programs. Admission to graduate study in French will be 
granted to a limited number of qualified students. A distinguished under- 
graduate record in the study of French literature and a capacity for indepen- 
dent work are considered essential. The award of advanced degrees is not 
based solely on accumulation of credits or compliance with formal require- 
ments. Candidates are expected to attain a wide general knowledge of the 
appropriate history and literature and to demonstrate their command of the 
French language. In most cases two years will be required for the completion 
of work for the degree of Master of Arts. All courses are given in French. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in French: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department: 
normally this will include twenty-four semester hours in advanced courses 
plus thesis work (six semester hours) 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one language other 
than French approved by the department 

3. Satisfactory performance on preliminary written and oral examinations in 
French on the French authors indicated in a reading list provided 

4. Completion of an acceptable thesis 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in French: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department: 
normally this will include fifty-four semester hours (including those re- 
quired for the degree of Master of Arts) plus thesis work (six semester 
hours) 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in two languages other 
than French approved by the department 

3. Satisfactory performance on a preliminary written and oral examination 
on the authors indicated in a reading list provided, and on the literature, 
culture, and civilization of France. The oral examination may be taken only 
after the successful completion of the written examination. Students have a 



184 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

choice between passing a preliminary examination in a second field of 
literature or taking one or two courses in a closely related field approved by 
the graduate faculty. If the student chooses to take two courses in such a 
"minor" field, only three semester hours will count toward the require- 
ments for the Ph.D. 
Note: Requirements 2 and 3 must be fulfilled one year before the submission 
of a dissertation. 

4. Completion of a dissertation approved by the department; the dissertation 
is expected to represent an original contribution 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the dissertation 
and related fields 

Note: Regardless of the type of appointment held by the graduate student, he 
or she may be required to undertake research or teaching assignments, 
depending upon the background of the graduate student and the needs of 
the department. 

French Courses 

101a,b; 102a,b. Elementary French (3-2-4 each semester). 

Introductory French. The course will be supplemented by films and language laboratory 
work. Mrs. Nelson, Staff 

103a. Accelerated Elementary French (6-0-6). 

Accelerated review of French for those wishing to enter French 201 in the spring semester. 
Equivalent to French 101, 102. Mrs. Nelson, Staff 

llOa.b. French for Graduate Students. (3-0-0). 

French grammar; emphasis on written language. Restricted to graduate students pre- 
paring for graduate language examination. With approval of student's department, passing of 
final examination will satisfy foreign language reading knowledge requirement. 

201a,b; 202a,b. Intermediate French (3-0-3 each semester). 

An introduction to some main currents in French literature. Reading of significant texts, 
composition, dictation, and conversation; grammar review. Staff 

203a, 204b. Intermediate French Conversation and Composition (3-0-3 
each semester). 
Practice of oral French at the intermediate level; dictation and composition. Staff 

303, 304. French Literature in Translation (3-0-3 each semester).t Mr. Brady 

309. French Civilization (3-0-3).t 

The development of French culture. The historical, scientific, social, and artistic achieve- 
ments of the French through the nineteenth century. This course is given in French. Pre- 
requisite: French 202 or placement exam. Open to freshmen. Ms. Alcorer 

310b. French Civilization (3-0-3). 

A thorough study of the manners, culture, and institutions of France from the nineteenth 
century to the present. This course is given in French. Mrs. Raaphorst 

311a. Introduction to French Literature (3-0-3). 

The main currents in French literature from its beginning to the nineteenth century. Re- 
quired for French majors. Taught in French. Prerequisite: French 202, 204, or placement 
examination. Staff 

312b. Introduction to French Literature (3-0-3). 

The main currents in French literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Re- 
quired for French majors. Taught in French. Prerequisite: French 202, 204, or placement 
examination. Staff 

315, 316. The French and World Novel (3-0-3 each semester).! Mr. Brady 

318. The Middle Ages and Renaissance (3-0-3).t Mr. Carrington 

321b. The Seventeenth Century (3-0-3). 

The 1979 topic will be "Classical Theatre." Ms. Alcover 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN 185 

322. The Seventeenth Century (3-0-3).t 

331. The Eighteenth Century (3-0-3).t 

The evolution of the "esprit philosophique" and of the literary genres during the century. 
Selected readings of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, Beaumarchais, Marivau.x. 

Mr.s. Raaphorst 

340. Expression of French Society Through Its Cinema (3-0-3).t 

Topic will change yearly. In English with separate discussions in French for majors. 

Mrs. Rnaphorst 

351. French Romanticism (3-0-3).t 

353. The Romantic Drama (3-0-3).t Mr. Bradi, 

390b. French Conversation and Composition (3-0-3). 

Study of spoken French. Practice in advanced conversation and composition. Prerequisite: 
Placement e.xamination which will be given the first day of class, or French 204. Staff 

391a. French Phonetics and Grammar (3-0-3). 

Practical application of the study of phonetics; practice in pronunciation and intonation. 
Grammar in review. Some laboratory work required. Open to freshmen. Staff 

403a, 404b. Directed Study and Honors Thesis (0-0-3 each semester). 
Departmental approval required. 

411. Introduction to Old French (3-0-3).t 

Presentation of the phonology and syntax of Old French. Selected readings from the prin- 
cipal literary genres of the medieval period. Prerequisite: French 311 or 312. Mr.^. Nelson 

451. Nineteenth-Century Poetry (3-0-3).t 

452a. French ReaHsm and Naturalism (3-0-3). 

A study of significant novels by Flaubert. Maupassant, Zola, Daudet, etc. Discussions and 
essays in French. Prerequisite: French 312. Mr. Brady 

480. Modern French Drama (3-0-3).t 

Contribution of the French playwrights Claudel, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Genet, lonesco, 
Beckett, and others to the contemporary theater in Europe and America. Prerequisite: French 
311 and 312. Mr. Lecuyer 

482a. Modern French Novel (3-0-3). 

Major novels of Proust, Malraux, Sartre, Robbe-Grillet, and Le Clezio. Detailed study, 
discussion and written analysis, in French. Mr. Lecuyer 

483b. Twentieth-Century French Literature (3-0-3). 

Appollinaire, Eluard, Pieyre de Mandiargues, Teilhard de Chardin, Claude Levy-Strauss. 
This course is given in French. Prerequisite: French 312. Mr. Lecuyer 

488b. Advanced Conversation, Composition, and Translation (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: French 390, with permission of the instructor. Staff 

491a,b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

Qualified students may, on the recommendation of the department, undertake a special 
research assignment. May be repeated for credit with additional topic. Staff 

501a,b. Graduate Research (0-0-6). 

Graduate research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

512. Topics in Medieval Literature (3-0-3).t 

517. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3-0-3).t 

518b. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3-0-3). 

The 1978-1979 topic will be "Lyric poetry to 1549." Mr. Carrington 

526. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature (3-0-3).t 

527b. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

Les moralistes: Montaigne. Pascal, Le Rochefoucauld, La Bruyere. Ms. Alcover 



186 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

535a. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

The 1978-1979 topic will be "Montesquieu and Diderot." Mr. Topazio 

536. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3).t 
555. Seminar in Romanticism (3-0-3).t 

568a. Seminar in Realism and Naturalism (3-0-3). 

The topic will be "Realism and Historicism: Stendal, Balzac, Dumas, Me'rimee, and 
Flaubert." Mr. Brady 

571. Seminar in Modern Literature (3-0-3).t Mrs. Raaphorst 

572b. Seminar in Modern Literature (3-0-3). 

The topic will be "Theatre in France from Maeterlink to Anouilh." Mr. Lecuyer 

577. Seminar in Contemporary Literature (3-0-3).t 

Modern approaches to the Explication de te.i-te. Mr. Lecuyer 

578. Seminar in Contemporary Literature (3-0-3).t 

Contemporary French poetry, with emphasis on Surrealism: Apollinaire, Aragon, Eluard 
and Prevert. Mr. Lecuyer 

579a. Studies in French Poetry (3-0-3). 

The 1978-1979 topic will be "Symbolism." Mr.s. Raaphorst 

592a. French and English Stylistics (3-0-3). 

A study of the characteristics of the French and English languages and of their differences; 
application to the problems of composition and translation. Mr. Lecuyer 

595. Special Topics in French Literature (0-0-3). 

On recommendation of the French faculty, a final-year candidate may be allowed to take 
this course to fill a particular lacuna. 

601a,b. Graduate Research (0-0-6). 

Graduate research and dissertation. 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. 
800b. Degree Candidate Only. 

Italian 

Italian Courses 

101a, 102b. Elementary Italian (3-2-4). 

Emphasis on the development of audio-lingual skills. Graded readings introduce basic 
elements of Italian culture and civilization. Language laboratory work required. Staff 

201a, 202b. Intermediate Italian (3-0-3). 

Emphasis on intensified oral and written practice. Review of grammar. An introduction to 
the culture and civilization of Italy. Staff 



Geology 



Professor D.R. Baker, Chairman; Professors J.A.S. Adams, DeBremaecker 

Heymann, Warme, and J.L. Wilson 

Adjunct Professor Worzel 

Associate Professors Ave Lallemant, Casey, and H.C. Clark 

Assistant Professors J. Anderson, Leeman, and Oldow 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Schwarzer 

Lecturer Powell 

Degrees Offered: B.A.. M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Requirements. The following courses are required for 
completion of the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in geology: 



GEOLOGY 187 

Geology 101, 111, 102, 112, which constitute a one-year sequence in intro- 
ductory geology with credit of four semester hours each semester. It is 
advisable to take Geology 101 and 102 in sequence; the laboratories 111 
and 112 should be taken concurrently with Geology 101 and 102. 

Geology 311, 312, 331. 332, 390, 401 (or 404), and 441. 

Four additional courses in geology at the 300 level or higher. 

The following supporting courses are also required: 

Mathematics 101, 102, or equivalent (not 107, 108) 
Chemistry 101, 102, 107 

Physics 101, 102 or 111, 112 or 121, 122; Physics 132 
At least three semester hours (one course) in mathematics, science, or 
engineering approved by the Geology Department. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 137 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

The Department of Geology offers an approved curriculum leading to 
certification in earth science as a second teaching field. The curriculum con- 
sists of twenty-five semester hours of introductory courses which would most 
benefit a secondary school teacher: i.e. physical and historical geology; study of 
minerals, rocks, and fossils; some work in astronomy, meteorology, and 
oceanography; and a three-week field course. 

Graduate Degrees. Students with a bachelor's degree in geology or re- 
lated sciences from Rice University, or an equivalent degree from another in- 
stitution of similar standing, are considered for admission to graduate work. 

Graduate work is conducted in those specialties that are compatible with 
the equipment available and with the interests of the staff. At present, the 
Department of Geology is prepared to offer advanced work in geochemistry, 
geophysics, igneous and metamorphic petrology, marine geology-ocean- 
ography, meteoritics and planetology, stratigraphy, sedimentation, sedimen- 
tary petrology, structural geology and rock mechanics, paleontology, micro- 
paleontology, and paleoecology. Graduate work in geology is oriented toward 
the theoretical and fundamental aspects of the subject rather than directly 
toward its many applied aspects. 

Requirements for advanced degrees in geology are: 

1. Completion at a high level of an approved program in geology and related 
subjects 

2. Satisfactory performance on a basic examination in geology. In addition, a 
Ph.D. qualifying examination administered by the thesis committee is 
required of all doctoral candidates. 

3. For the Ph.D. degree, demonstration of competence in one approved foreign 
language 

4. Completion for publication of a thesis which represents an original con- 
tribution to the science 

5. Oral defense of the research work and conclusions of the thesis 

6. Satisfactory performance in teaching a laboratory in some basic course 
regardless of type of graduate appointment 

Most graduate students can expect to spend two years beyond the bach- 



188 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

elor's degree in order to complete requirements for the master's degree and an 
additional two years for the Ph.D. degree. Some students of very high ability 
may be allowed to bypass the master's degree and work directly for the Ph.D. 

Geology Courses 

101a. The Earth (3-0-3). 

Nature of the earth and the physical processes that control and change it: plate tectonics to 
the central core, from ocean deep to mountains. Also offered as Geography 101. Mr. Clark 

102b. Heritage of the Earth (3-0-3). 

Introduction to earth history, tracing the origin and development of Earth, atmosphere, 
hydrosphere, and life, and of the movement of continents through time. Also offered as 
Geography 102. Mr. War me 

104b. The Earth (3-0-3). 

A course on major Earth processes. Topics incude: origin, chronology, plate tectonics, 
mineralogy, weathering, sedimentation, volcanism, plutonism, geophysics, geochemistry, and 
structural geology. Mr. Heymann 

Ilia. Laboratory Study of the Earth (0-3-1). 

Study of rocks and minerals, maps, and air photos. Also offered as Geography 111. 

Mr. Clark 
112b. Laboratory for Heritage of the Earth (0-3-1). 

Study of sedimentary rocks, fossils, and geologic maps with application toward unravelling 
earth history. Also offered as Geography 112. Mr. Warme 

311a. Mineralogy (3-3-4). 

Basic introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, systematics and classification, 
physical and chemical properties, distribution, occurrence and genesis of minerals, and optical 
mineralogy. Mr. Leeman 

312b. Petrology (3-6-5). 

Description and interpretation of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. Labora- 
tory work emphasizes study of rock thin section with petrographic microscope. Mr. Powell 

321a. Environmental Geology (3-0-3). 

Study of evolutionary mechanisms by which life has adjusted to terrestrial conditions and 
man's impacts on these adjustments. Mr. Adamfi 

322b. Mineral Resources (3-0-3). 

Study of geologic, legal, economic, and political interrelationships that create the energy 
and material mixes. Mr. Adams 

331a. Structural Geology (3-3-4). 

Introduction to deformation mechanics, structural analysis of faults and folds, igneous and 
metamorphic rocks. Laboratory emphasizes practical use of structural theory. Mr. Oldow 

332b. Sedimentation (3-3-4). 

Properties of sedimentation, includes both classic and carbonate rocks. Mr. Ander.'fon 

333a. Structural Geology (3-0-3). 

Same course as Geology 331 except no laboratory. For nonmajors only. Staff 

334b. Introduction to Field Mapping Techniques (0-6-2). 

Beginning field techniques taught in approximately seven field days plus class meetings. 
Geologic map and report to be completed. Recommended as a prerequisite for Geology 390. Staff 

341a. The Oceans (3-0-3). 

Introduction to science of oceanography; survey of the geological, physical, and biological 
aspects. Mainly for nonscience majors. Mr. Andertton 

343a. Laboratory Study of the Oceans (0-3-1). 

An investigation in the laboratory and field of topics covered in Geology 341. Mr. Anderson 

352b. Engineering Geology (3-3-4). 

Analysis, in terms of engineering and environmental applications, of earthquakes, faults, 
landslides, shorelines, ground water, subsidence, and other geologic phenomena. Techniques of 
engineering geology investigation. Mr. Clark 



GEOLOGY 189 

390. Field Geology (1-9-4). 

Summer field course taken at any of several approved camps operated by various universi- 
ties, or Rice University Field Course. 

401a. Stratigraphy and Advanced Historical Geology (3-3-4). 

Principles of stratigraphy and environmental interpretation of stratigraphic sequences. 

Mr. Wilson 
402. Paleontology (3-3-4).t 

Introduction to morphology and geologic record of major animal groups characterized by 
significant fossil representation; principles of evolution, paleoecology, correlation, and 
taxonomy. Mr. Warme 

403a. Advanced Studies in Physical Geology (1-0-1). 

Introduction to current research in geology. Each faculty member in department partici- 
pates by describing his research and some of the techniques involved. Staff 

404b. Advanced Historical Geology — North America, North Africa, and 
Middle East (3-3-4). staff 

405. Micropaleontology (2-6-4). f 

Study of microfossils, emphasis on identification, ecology, paleoecology and biostratigraphy of 
Radiolaria and Foraminifera. Prerequisite: Geology 402 or consent of department. Mr. Casey 

412b. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3-3-4). 

Development of geologic, petrologic, mineralogic, physical, chemical, and experimental 
principles of petrology; origin and evolution of major rocks emphasized. 

Mr. Ave Lallemant, Mr. Baker. Mr. Leeman 

417. Physical and Chemical Oceanography (3-3-4).t 

Study of physical and chemical aspects of oceanography, especially water masses, circula- 
tion, waves, and their effect on geological and biological oceanography. Mr. Casey 

418b. Marine Geology (3-3-4). 

Study of geological aspects of oceanography, including geomorphology, nearshore pro- 
cesses, seafloor spreading, plate tectonics, marine geophysics, marine sediments, and paleo- 
oceanography. Mr. Anderson, Mr. Clark 

419. Biological Oceanography (3-3-4).t 

Study of the biological aspects of oceanography emphasizing planktonic organisms: 
nektonic and benthonic organisms and paleooceanography also considered. 

441a. Introduction to Geophysics (3-3-4). 

Gravity, magnetism, paleomagnetism, heat flow, and seismology; geophysical measure- 
ments interpreted in terms of plate tectonics, the earth's interior, and surface geology. 

Mr. DeBremaecker 

442. Introduction to Exploration Geophysics (3-0-3).t 

Basic principles and field procedures of geophysical prospecting including recording, 
processing, and interpretation of seismic data and gravity, magnetic and well logging methods. 

455a, 456b. Geochemistry (3-3-4 each semester). 

Study of terrestrial mechanisms governing the distribution of the chemical elements. 
Laboratory in geochemical techniques. Mr. Adams, Mr. Baker. Mr. Heymann, Mr. Leeman 

461a. Geophysics (3-3-4). 

Use of present gravity and magnetic fields in determining Earth's internal structure, mag- 
netic field in past and its use; heat flow measurements at the surface. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 211 or equivalent. Mr. Clark 

462b. Geophysics (3-3-4). 

Seismology — a study of elastic waves in infinite and layered media. Determination of the 
internal structure of the earth from surface observations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211 or 
equivalent. Mr. DeBremaecker 

481a, 482b. Research in Geology (Credit variable). 

Advanced work adapted to the needs of the individual student. Staff 

491a, 492b. Special Studies (Credit variable). 

A study of recent research in specific fields under the guidance of a staff member. Staff 



190 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

501a, 502b. Special Studies (Credit variable). 

Advanced work in certain phases of geology adapted to the needs of individual graduate 
students. Registration permitted only with consent of department. Staff 

504. Environmental Stratigraphy (3-3-4).t 

Principles of stratigraphy and stratigraphic analysis taught through analysis of various 
depositional environments to ascertain controls exercised by tectonics, geography, and climate 
in formation of rock strata. Mr. Wilson 

505a. Carbonate Geology (3-3-4). 

Study of recent carbonate sediments, their depositional environments, and diagenesis; 
application of such principles to ancient strata. Mr. Wiltion 

511a-528b. Seminars in Geology (3-0-3). 

Courses covering subjects listed under Geology 581-598. Individual seminars cover 
different topics in different years and may be taken more than once. Staff 

531. The Interior of the Earth (3-0-3).t 

Methods and results of seismology, gravity, magnetism, and heat flow will be used in the 
framework of plate tectonics to obtain evidence about the earth's interior. 

535b. Stable Isotope Geochemistry (3-0-3). 

Review of basic principles of isotope fractionation mechanisms and distributions of iso- 
topes with focus on significance to major geological problems. Mr. Baker 

536a. Organic Geochemistry (3-0-3). 

Principles and procedures of organic geochemistry applied to important geological prob- 
lems, petroleum evolution, physical and chemical history of sediments. Mr. Baker 

537a. Advanced Sedimentary Geology I (3-3-4). 

Lecture, lab, and field problems focusing on sedimentology and sedimentary petrography. 

Mr. Andersoti, Mr. Baker 

538b. Advanced Sedimentary Geology II (3-3-4). 

Lecture, lab, and field problems focusing on stratigraphic sequences and paleoenviron- 
mental analysis. Mr. Warme, Mr. Wilson 

539a, 540b. Advanced Petrology (3-3-4 each semester). 

Advanced topics in igneous and metamorphic petrology with emphasis on interests of the 
staff. Modern developments are rigorously examined in physiochemical terms. .Staff 

551a. Chemical Geology I (3-3-4). 

Application of physical chemistry to geology. Includes basic thermodynamics, phase and 
mineral equilibria, solution chemistry, chemical bonding. Mr. Heymann 

552. Chemical Geology II (3-3-4).t 

An advanced survey of solution chemistry, chemistry of ocean water, hydrothermal solu- 
tions, brines, interaction of solids and aqueous solutions. Mr. Heymann 

555a. Advanced Topics in Geochemistry (3-3-4). 

Study of selected topics, particularly geochronology, radiometry, isotope and trace element 
analysis. Mr. Adanis 

556b. Radiogeology (3-3-4). 

The determination of natural and artifical radioactivities, emphasizing the mobilization, 
transportation and fixation in the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biota. Mr. Adams 

561a. Advanced Topics in Geophysics (3-3-4). 

Content varies from year to year: Convection, advanced wave propagation, tectonophysics, 
etc. Mi: DeBremaecker 

562b. Advanced Topics in Geophysics (3-0-3). 

Folding and faulting will be studied from three points of view: laboratory data, field data, 
and computer models. Mr. DeBremaecker 

563a. Advanced Tectonics I (3-3-4). 

Mechanics of rock deformation in theory, in experiments, and in nature. Mr. Ave Lallemant 

564b. Advanced Tectonics II (3-3-4). 

Regional tectonic analysis. Mr. Oldow 



GEOLOGY 191 



566. Experimental Structural Geology (2-3-3).t 

Selected topics, such as elasticity and plasticity of minerals and rocks. Laboratory work 
includes experimental rock deformation. Mr. Ave Lallemant 

568b. Structural Analysis of Deformed Rocks (2-3-3). 

Studies of structures, textures, and petrofabrics of deformed rocks; stress and strain 
analysis. Mr. Ave Lallemant 

574a. Electron Microprobe Scanning Electron Microscope (1-0-1). 

Examination of fundamental principles, techniques of analysis and applications of Elec- 
tron Microprobe/SEM. Emphasis on geological problems. Mr. Powell 

576b. Electron Microprobe Scanning Electron Microscope Laboratory 

(0-2-1). 

Practical instruction and experience in analytical techniques using the Electron Micro- 
probe/SEM. Mr. Powell 

581a, 582b. Research in Physical and Structural Geology (0-9-3 each 

semester). staff 

583a, 584b. Research in Sedimentology (0-9-3 each semester). Staff 

585a, 586b. Research in Petrology (0-9-3 each semester). staff 

587a, 588b. Research in Geochemistry and Meteoritics (0-9-3 each 

semester). staff 

589a, 590b. Research in Geophysics (0-9-3 each semester). Staff 

591a, 592b. Research in Paleontology and Stratigraphy (0-9-3 each 

semester). staff 

593a, 594b. Research in Economic Geology (0-9-3 each semester). Staff 
595a, 596b. Research in Regional Geology (0-9-3 each semester). Staff 

597a, 598b. Research in Marine Geology and Oceanography (0-9-3 each 

semester). staff 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. staff 

80Gb. Degree Candidate Only. 

Geography Courses ■ . . • ,'! < : . 

101a. The Earth (3-0-3). 

Nature of the earth and the physical processes that control and change it: plate tectonics to 
the central core, from ocean deep to mountains. Also offered as Geology 101. Mr. Clark 

102b. Heritage of the Earth (3-0-3). 

Introduction to earth history, tracing the origin and development of Earth, atmosphere, 
hydrosphere, and life, and of the movement of continents through time. Also offered as 
Geology 102. Mr. Warme 

Ilia. Laboratory Study of the Earth (0-3-1). 

Study of rocks and minerals, maps, and air photos. Also offered as Geology 111. 

112b. Laboratory for Heritage of the Earth (0-3-1). 

Study of sedimentary rocks, fossils, and geologic maps with application toward unraveling 
earth history. Also offered as Gology 112. 

310b. World Ethnography (3-0-3). 

Introduction to cultural geography through survey of geographical and cultural areas of 
the world. Emphasis on the interrelationships between human societies and their physical 
environments. No prerequisite. Also offered as Anthropology 310. 



192 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

German and Russian 



German 



Professor Weissenberger, Chairman; Professor Winkler 
Associate Professors S.L. Clark, Copeland, Eifler, and J.B. Wilson 

Offered: B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major in German. Students 
majoring in German may pursue either of two options: German literature or 
German studies. 

For an option in German literature the requirements are: 

1. Completion of a program approved by the department 

2. The equivalent of at least twenty-four semester hours (eight courses) 
numbered 300 or higher 

3. Collateral courses in other literatures, history, and philosophy as recom- 
mended by the department 

For an option in German studies the requirements are: 

1. Completion of a program which has been defined in close cooperation with 
the departmental undergraduate adviser 

2. The equivalent of at least eighteen semester hours (six courses) in courses 
numbered 300 or higher 

3. At least twelve semester hours (four courses) in courses relating to the field 
of German in other departments. Courses in translation offered by the 
German Department pertaining to German culture and civilization count 
toward the fulfillment of the area requirement. 

This option in German studies, which permits maximum flexibility with- 
in a frame of clearly defined objectives, allows an interdisciplinary approach 
to German affairs. The student can incorporate into the study of German lan- 
guage and literature subject-related courses in political science, history, 
musicology, art history, philosophy, and economics. The option in German 
studies is designed for students who are preparing for a career in international 
law, business, banking, or diplomacy, and for graduate study in a variety of 
fields such as history, political science, library science, art history, etc. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Honors Program. The department offers a special program for outstand- 
ing students consisting of independent readings and research which must lead 
to a substantial honors essay under the supervision of a departmental faculty 
member. Admission is decided in the second semester of a student's sopho- 
more year. 

German Literature in Translation. Courses in German literature in 
translation (designated "Germanics" with course number) are open to under- 
graduate students from all disciplines and of all classes. Readings and discus- 
sions are in English. These courses may be repeated for credit. 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 193 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in German: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department: 
normally this will include twenty-four semester hours at the graduate level 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign lan- 
guage other than German approved by the department 

3. Completion of an acceptable thesis 

4. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis and 
related topics 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in German: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department: 
normally this will include forty-five semester hours at the graduate level, 
including those required for the degree of Master of Arts 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in two foreign lan- 
guages other than German approved by the department 

3. Satisfactory performance on a preliminary written and oral examination 
on the general field of German studies; this examination will be based in 
part on a reading list provided by the department 

4. Completion of a dissertation approved by the department; the dissertation 
is expected to represent an original contribution to knowledge 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the dissertation 
and related fields 

Note: Requirements 1 and 2 must be met at least a year before the submission 
of a dissertation. 

As part of their training, graduate students, regardless of the type of 
appointment, will be required to perform some duties, such as assisting in 
classes, the language laboratory, research, and other activities suggested by 
the department. 

German Courses 

lOla.b; 102a,b. Elementary German (3-2-4 each semester). 

Introductory German with emphasis on speaking and reading. The course will be sup- 
plemented by language laboratory work. Staff 

103a. Accelerated Beginning German (6-4-8). 

The equivalent of German 101 and 102 in one semester. Permission of instructor required. 

Mr. Copeland, Staff 

Ilia, 112b. German for Graduate Students (3-0-0 each semester). 

A concise introduction to the reading of German for research purposes. A noncredit course, 
restricted to graduate students. Staff 

201a,b. Intermediate German (3-0-3). 

Grammar, conversation, and extensive reading supplemented by films and language 
laboratory work. Mr. Copeland. Mr. Wilson, Mr. Winkler 

202a,b. Intermediate German (3-0-3). 

Intermediate language skills with readings, discussion of literary texts, and related 
materials. Prerequisite: German 201, 203, or equivalent. Mr. Copeland. Staff 

203a, 204b. Intermediate German: Scientific (3-0-3 each semester). 

Language skills based on readings from German scientific books and journals, some from 
the student's own field, films, and radio. Mr. Wilson 

206. Accelerated Intermediate German (6-2-6).t 

Increases fluency in speaking and reading: introduces short works of German literature. 
Permission of instructor. Mr. Copeland, Staff 

301a, 302b. Advanced Scientific German I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Continuation of German 204. Open to all students with second-year competency. Mr. Wilson 



194 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

303b. Intermediate German: Commercial (3-0-3). 

Introduction to general business practices and terminology useful in a subsequent business 
career. Prerequisite: Second-year competency or consent of instructor. Ms. Eifler 

305a, 306b. Composition and Conversation I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

A variety of reading materials serve as the basis for discussions and compositions. Pre- 
requisite: second-year competency. Mr. Weissenberger 

311a. Survey of German Literature I (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the historical development of German literature: description, interpreta- 
tion, analysis of literature, and literary trends through the nineteenth century. 

312. Survey of German Literature II (3-0-3).t 

German literature from the late nineteenth century to the present. Continuation of German 
311. Staff 

322b. Reading Dutch and Scandinavian (3-0-3). 

A good reading knowledge of German and English is applied toward at least a fair reading 
ability in Dutch and Swedish, Afrikaans, Danish, Norwegian. Mr. Wilson 

341a. The Age of Goethe (3-0-3). 

German classical literature (1770-1820); emphasis changes from year to year. May be 
repeated for credit. Mr. Winkler 

342b. Romanticism and Realism (3-0-3). 

Nineteenth-century literary tendencies related to social, political context. May be repeated 
for credit. Mr. Winkler 

371a. German Literature from 1900 to 1945 (3-0-3). 

Concentrates on the literature of German Expressionism and the Weimar Republic. 

372b. German Literature Since 1945 (3-0-3). 

Authors who began their careers after 1945; for example, B511, Grass, DUrrenmatt, Weiss. 

Mr. Winkler 

375a. Germany Today: East and West (3-0-3). 

A comparative study of the two German states. Readings include documentary and literary 
texts. Ms. Eifler 

381. Major Authors of German Literature (3-0-3).t 

391, 392. Special Topics (3-0-3 each semester).t 

401a, 402b. Independent Work in German Literature or Philology (3-0-3 

each semester). 

Qualified students will work on projects of their choice under the supervision of individual 
instructors. May be repeated for credit. Staff 

403, 404. Introduction to Germanic Linguistics (3-0-3 each semester).! 

May be repeated for credit. Introductory linguistic concepts and aspects of German 
phonology and syntax. Mr. Copeland 

405. Introduction to Gothic and Old High German (3-0-3).t 

Basic readings in language and literature. Open to graduate students for credit. Mr. WiLton 

411a. Introduction to Middle High German Language and Literature 

(3-0-3). 

Middle High German language and representative works from literature of the courtly 
period (twelfth and thirteenth centuries). Open to graduate students for credit. Ms. Clark 

412. Middle High German Lyric and Epic Poetry (3-0-3).t 

Literature of the first high point of German literary development. Texts are read in the 
original. Prerequisite: German 411. Open to graduate students for credit. Ms. Clark 

421. German Literature of the Renaissance and Reformation (3-0-3). t 
The course deals with major aspects of German literature from 1400 until 1600. Open to 

graduate students for credit. Ms. Clark 

422. German Literature of the Baroque (3-0-3).t 

The course discusses German literature of the seventeenth century. Open to graduate 
students for credit. 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 195 

431. Advanced Stylistics (3-0-3).t 

For advanced students, to achieve oral and written proficiency in German, using tape 
recordings, films, and current newspaper articles. Prerequisite: German 305 or permission of 
instructor. Mr. Weissenberger 

500a,b. Graduate Research. 

Graduate research and thesis in partial fulfillment for the degree of Master of Arts. Staff 

511a, 512b. Independent Graduate Study in German Literature or Philol- 
ogy (3-0-3 each semester). staff 

521b. Gothic (3-0-3). 

The Gothic language, its significance in the Germanic subfamily, readings from the Bible 
translation of Bishop Ulfilas (fourth century). Mr. Wihon 

522. Old High German (3-0-3).t 

Language and literature of the Old High German period (eighth to eleventh centuries); 
texts from the pagan and the monastic traditions. Mr. Wilson 

523. Old Saxon (3-0-3).t 

Early North German language and literature, chiefly the long epic poem Heliaiul in 
Germanic alliterative verse. Mr. Wihon 

524. Old Icelandic (3-0-3).t 

The earliest Scandinavian language and literature: runic inscriptions, the prose sagas of 
the Viking era, the Eddie poetry of Germanic gods and heroes. Mr. Wihon 

526b. Seminar in Medieval Literature (3-0-3). 

Specific aspects and problems of medieval literature. The topic may vary from year to year. 
Spring topic: Wolfram von Eschenbach. Ms. Clark 

531. Linguistic Structure of German (3-0-3).t 

532. Special Topics in German Linguistics (3-0-3).t 

The topics change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. Mr. Copeland 

561. Seminar in Literary Criticism (3-0-3).t 

An introduction into the major modes of literary historiography, interpretation, and 
evaluation since Dilthey. Mr. Winkler 

562. Seminar in Literary Theory (3-0-3).t 

Historical studies of poetic theories and literary aesthetics. Mr. Winkler 

563. Seminar in Literary Genres (3-0-3).t 

May be repeated for credit. • Mr. Winkler 

565, 566. Special Topics in German Literature (3-0-3 each semester).t 

571a. Seminar in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (3-0-3). 

The course deals with specific aspects, problems, and authors of the period. May be re- 
peated for credit. Fall topic: 1820-1850. Mr. Wei.'^senberger 

572a. Seminar in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (3-0-3). 

This course deals with specific aspects, problems and authors of the period. May be re- 
peated for credit. Mr. Winkler 

591. Selected Problems in Modern Literature (3-0-3).t 
May be repeated for credit. 

592b. Selected Problems in Modern Literature (3-0-3). 

May be repeated for credit. Spring topic: the German novel from 1900 to 1933. M.s. Eifler 

600a,b. Graduate Research. 

Graduate research and dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

700c. Graduate Summer Research. 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



196 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

German Literature in Translation 

Germanics Courses 

311, 312. German Ideology (3-0-3 each sem€ster).t Mr. Winkler 

321. Viking Literature in Translation (3-0-3).t 

The literature of medieval Scandinavia: runic inscriptions, laws, sagas, Eddie poetry, 
skaldic poetry. Mr. Wihon 

351, 352. Great German Authors of the Twentieth Century in Translation 

(3-0-3 each semester).t 

361, 362. Special Topics in Modern German Literature, in Translation 

(3-0-3 each semester).! 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. 

401a. Major Trends in German Literature from the Middle Ages Through 
the Enlightenment (3-0-3). 

Fall topic: Medieval women. Examination of the role of women in the Middle Ages from a 
theoretical and literary-historical viewpoint. Ms. Clark 

402b. German Literature of the Middle Ages (3-0-3). 

Spring topic: introduction to Medieval symbolism and allegory. Examines the funda- 
mentals of medieval figurative expression. M.s. Clark 

403a. Germany Today: East and West (3-0-3). 

A comparative study of the two German states. Reading materials will include docu- 
mentary and literary texts. In English. Ms. Eifler 

Russian 

Associate Professors R.G. Jones, E.M. Thompson, 
and Ushinsky 

Degree Offered: B.A. 

Undergraduate Major. At least twenty-four semester hours (eight 
courses) offered in fulfillment of major requirements must be numbered 300 
or higher. Double majors may be allowed to take eighteen semester hours (six 
courses numbered 300 or higher) with the approval of the department and 
should consult with the Russian staff to arrange a program compatible with 
the other major. Four of the courses must be language courses and the re- 
mainder in literature, which may be chosen by the student with the adviser's 
consent. All departmental majors must have their programs approved by the 
representative of the department. 

Russian Courses » 

101a, 102b. Elementary Russian I, II (3-2-4 each semester). 

Fundamentals of Russian grammar. Pronunciation, reading, oral practice, and trans- 
lation. Staff 

110. Russian for Graduate Students (3-0-0).t 

201a, 202b. Intermediate Russian I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 
Grammar review, reading of selected texts, conversation, and composition. 

Mr. Jones, Ms. Thompson 

301a, 302b. Reading, Composition, and Conversation (3-0-3 each semester). 

Emphasis on composition and conversation with reading of relevant texts. Mr. Jones 

311, 312. Advanced Conversation (3-0-3 each semester).t 

Intensive practice in Russian conversation. Wide variety of topics drawn from everyday 
life, newspapers, contemporary short stories. Prerequisite: second-year competence or per- 
mission of instructor. Mr. Ushinsky 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 197 



331a. Survey of Russian Literature I (3-0-3).t 

A comprehensive survey of the best known Russian literature up to 1860. The emphasis is 
on the classic works of the nineteenth century. Mr. ihhinsky 

332b. Survey of Russian Literature II (3-0-3).t 

A comprehensive survey of Russian literature from 1860 to the Soviet period. Mr. U-'^hin.^ky 

341a, 342. Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature (3-0-3 each semester). 

Writers and literary trends of the nineteenth century. Fall topic: Dostoevsky. Readings and 
lectures in English; majors will do part in Russian. Mf. Thompmn 

401a, 402b. Russian Stylistics I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Designed to improve the spoken and written language with emphasis on syntactic and 
idiomatic structures. Mr. Ufthinsky. 

410. Russian Soviet Literature in European Perspective (3-0-3).t 

The currents in Soviet letters with a look at the parallel or opposite tendencies in Western 
Europe at the same time. Staff 

441a, 442b. Special Topics in Russian Literature (3-0-3 each semester). 

Fall topic: The Russians: an introductory survey of Russian culture. Spring topic: Women 
in Russian Literature. Readings in English: Russian majors will do some reading and discus- 
sion in Russian. Afs. Thompson 

450a,b. Independent Study (3-0-3 each semester). 

Qualified students may conduct research and write a paper on a topic of particular interest. 

Staff 



Health and Physical Education 



Professor Bearden, Chairman; Professor Spence 

Visiting Professor Poindexter 

Adjunct Professor Skaggs 

Associate Professors Barker and Bland 

Assistant Professors Disch, Hampton, and Lee 

Lecturers Bordelon and Eggert 

Instructors Carr and McFall 

Degrees Offered: B.A. with major in Physical Education; Health Education 
as teaching field only. 

A minimum of 128 semester hours is required for the Bachelor of Arts 
with a major in physical education. The university distribution and skills 
requirements described on pages 50 and 51 must be satisfied. Physical educa- 
tion majors, including students planning physical education as a teaching 
field, must complete at least twenty-four semester hours of physical education 
courses plus eight semester hours selected from the following list of labora- 
tories: Physical Education 125. 126, 221, 225, 226, 325, 326, 327, 328, 425, 426. 
Physical Education 105, 120, and 126 are required courses and should be taken 
as early as possible. 

Both physical education and health education are offered as fields for 
teacher certification. Students wishing to qualify for teacher certification by 
the Texas Education Agency must complete twelve semester hours of English, 
six semester hours of American History, six semester hours of federal and 
state government, eighteen semester hours of education, twenty-four semester 
hours in another teaching field, and twenty-four semester hours of health 



198 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



education courses or physical education courses, according to which is selected 
for the teaching field. 

Health education courses cannot be used to fulfill the requirements for a 
major in physical education but may be taken as electives by all students. 



Physical Education Courses 

101a. Basic Health and Physical Education (0-2-0). 

Includes a variety of physical education activities with emphasis on team sports. Required 
for the baccalaureate. Staff 

102b. Basic Health and Physical Education (0-2-0). 

Includes a variety of physical education activities with emphasis on individual sports. 
Required for the baccalaureate. Staff 

105a. Foundations of Physical Education (3-0-3). 

Study of contributions of history, philosophy, biology, physiology, anthropology, sociology, 
and psychology to the nature and structure of physical education. Ms. Poinde.rter 

120b. Scientific Foundations of Physical Education (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the scientific areas of physical education: anatomy, physiology, bio- 
mechanics, motor learning, evaluation and research. Mr. Dit^ch, Staff 

125a. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Methods of teaching and coaching the following team sports: soccer, volleyball, lacrosse, 
team handball, speedball, and rugby. Mr. Hampton 

126b. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

This course will certify students as water safety instructors. Mr. Bland 

201a. Intramural Sports and Community Recreation Programs (3-0-3). 

Study of the organization and administration of intramural sports programs and commu- 
nity recreation programs. Mr. Barker 

221a. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

The Red Cross multi-media standard first aid course including CPR (a prerequisite to 
Health 308). Mr. Carr 

225a. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Methods of teaching and coaching the following physical education activities: handball, 
racquetball, squash, tennis, and badminton. Mr. Barker 

226b. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Introduction to gj'mnastics including activities on tumbling, trampoline, parallel bars, 
balance beam, vaulting, and uneven parallel bars. Mr. Hampton 

250b. Anatomy and Physiology (3-0-3). 

Introduction to human anatomy and physiology, with emphasis on gross structure and 
basic concepts of function in man. Mr. Speuce 

301a. Kinesiology (3-0-3). 

A review of applied anatomy, mechanical analysis of selected physical activities, and 
physical principles of body mechanics. Prerequisite: Physical Education 250 or consent of 
instructor. Mr. Disch 

305a. Physical Education for Exceptional Children (3-0-3). 

Areas of exceptionality displayed by children within the school or institution relative to the 
physical educator's role. Mr. Bearden 

310b. Methods, Materials, and Curriculum Construction in Physical 

Education (3-0-3). 

Study of methods of teaching physical education. Special emphasis on teaching techniques 
and the learning process. Ms-. Lee 

312b. Motor Learning (3-0-3). 

Perceptual motor development from childhood through adulthood. Consideration of 
physiological and psychological factors affecting skill acquisition and development. 

Ms. Poindexter 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 199 

319a. Tests and Measurements (3-0-3). 

Introduction to basic statistics, test construction and evaluation as related to physical 
education. Mr. Hampton 

321a. Physiology of Exercise (3-0-3). 

Considers physiologic response of the circulatory, respiratory, and muscular systems to 
exercise stress. Prerequisite: Physical Education 250. Mr. Spence 

323a. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Measuring physiologic response to exercise stress. (For students enrolled in Physical 
Education 321). Mr. Spence 

325a. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Physical education activities included are recreational games, elementary rhythms, golf, 
archery, and fencing. Mr. Bearden, Ms. Karff 

326b. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Techniques and responsibilities of the athletic trainer. Mr. Eggert 

327a. Officiating- Team Sports (0-3-1). 

Laboratory to teach rules, mechanics and philosophy of officiating team sports. Mr. Dii^ch 

328b. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Modern and folk dance laboratory experience designed to improve teaching competency 
in contemporary and folk dance. M.s. Karff 

400b. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion (Including Athletics), Secondary Schools (3-0-3). 

Administrative policies and procedures, personnel, budgets, facilities, and equipment; 
office management, schedules, public relations, and publicity. Prerequisite: junior or senior 
standing. Mr. Bearden 

411a. Concepts and Techniques of Athletic Coaching (3-0-3). 

Coaching techniques, concepts, and problems in the major athletic sports. Mr. Bland 

425a. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Methods of teaching and coaching the following sports: basketball and football. Mr. Bland 

426b. Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Methods of teaching and coaching the following sports: baseball and track. Mr. Bland 



Health Education Courses 

101a. Nutrition (3-0-3). 

Designed to bring an understanding of the concepts underlying the science of nutrition: 
food composition, calories and needs for energy, special nutrients and nutritional deficiencies. 

Mr. Awapara 
107a. Concepts in Health Science (3-0-3). 

Designed to acquaint prospective health educators with the structure and function of 
health in our society. . Staff 

201a. Environmental Systems (3-3-4). 

A study of the sociologic, economic, political, legal, scientific and engineering aspects of 
pollution and pollution abatement. Mr. Ward 

208b. Chemical Alterations of Behavior (3-0-3). 

Investigates the use, abuse, and misuse of alcohol, tobacco, and psycho-active drugs. 

Mr. Hampton 
221a. Standard First Aid/Multi-Media (0-3-1). 

The Red Cross multi-media standard first aid course (a prerequisite to Health 308). Mr. Carr 

306b. Human Sexuality (3-0-3). 

The role of the school and the family in relation to mental health, family life education, 
geriatrics, and death. Staff 

308b. Emergency Care/Advanced First Aid Instructor (2-0-3). 

Emergency care procedures of illness and traumatic injuries. Prerequisite: Health 221. 

Mr. Carr 



200 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



356b. Sociology of Health and Illness (3-0-3). 

Social and cultural factors that influence physical and mental disorders; behaviors that 
underlie the course of illness, and delivery of health care within American society. Mr. Kaplan 

370a. History of Medicine (3-0-3). 

Changing concepts of diseases and health developments in public health and the emergence 
of the modern health care profession. Mr. Van Helden 

407a. Diseases of the Human Organism (3-0-3). 

A study of communicable, noncommunicable, and sexually transmitted diseases affecting 
man. Staff 

410b. Program Development in Health Education (3-0-3). 

Content and methods in teaching health education, materials of the program and curricu- 
lum construction in secondary school health education programs. Prerequisite: junior or 
senior standing. Staff 



History 



Professor Drew, Chairman; Professors Garside, Gruber, 

Higginbotham, Hyman, Loewenheim, 

Matusow, Rath, and Vandiver 

Associate Professors Haskell, Stokes, Van Helden, and Wiener 

Assistant Professors Miller and R. J. Smith 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Major. A student majoring in history must take a 
minimum of thirty semester hours (ten courses) in history, of which eighteen 
semester hours (six courses) must be on the advanced level (300's or ^OO's). At 
least six semester hours (two courses) must be taken in American history, and 
at least six semester hours (two courses) in fields other than American history. 
Students are advised to acquaint themselves with humanistic disciplines other 
than history (for example, literature, fine arts, and philosophy), and also with 
social sciences such as political science, sociology, economics, and anthro- 
pology, whose contributions to historical studies are of increasing importance. 
Some foreign language proficiency is recommended for the potential traveler, 
researcher, or graduate student (most graduate schools require a reading 
knowledge of French and German for the Ph.D. degree). 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Graduate Study. Graduate students in history are accepted for study 
leading to either the M.A. or Ph.D. Holders of the B.A. degree (or its equiva- 
lent) from an acceptable institution are eligible to apply. The graduate pro- 
gram is designed to train a limited number of carefully selected students. Both 
the M.A. and the Ph.D. degrees are offered in limited areas of American and 
European history. Further information about the fields may be obtained on 
request from the department. 

Graduate fellowships as well as graduate scholarships within the limits of 
available funds are awarded to qualified students with demonstrated ability. 
Fellowships include a stipend and a waiver of tuition; scholarships provide a 



HISTORY 201 

waiver of tuition only. As a part of their training all graduate students are 
expected to render limited services to the department as tutorial instructors, 
as research assistants, or as assistants to the editors oi the Journal of Southern 
History, the Austrian History Yearbook; or The Papers of Jefferson Davis, all of 
which are sponsored by Rice University. 

Requirements for the M.A. Candidates for the M.A. are expected to 
complete a certain amount of formal class or seminar work, usually twenty- 
four semester hours (eight courses); pass a reading examination in one foreign 
language (usually French or German); and write a thesis under the direction 
of an advisory committee of the department headed by a professor having 
special competence in the subject area of the thesis. An oral defense of the 
thesis is also required. Completion of these requirements usually take two 
years. Not more than three years may elapse between the time the student is 
admitted to graduate study and the completion of the degree, unless an exten- 
sion is approved by the departmental graduate committee. An alternate M.A. 
degree is available to doctoral students who fulfill the special requirements 
set by the department. 

Requirements for the Ph.D. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are ex- 
pected to prepare themselves for a qualifying examination in four fields, at 
least two of which must be in the major area of concentration (either Euro- 
pean or American history). If the major area is European history, one field 
must be in American history; if the major is in American history, one field 
must be in European history. The fourth field may be outside the department 
if approved by the departmental graduate committee. Preparation for this 
qualifying examination (the passing of which qualifies the student for formal 
admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree) will normally include course 
work, seminars, directed reading, and a substantial amount of independent 
reading. The examination will usually be oral, though it may be written or 
both written and oral at the discretion of the department. It is given only after 
the student has completed all necessary course and seminar work and passed 
reading examinations in two foreign languages (usually French and German). 
Students should take the qualifying examination before the beginning of their 
sixth semester and must take it by the end of the sixth semester. In addition to 
the foreign language examinations and the qualifying examination, the Ph.D. 
candidate must present a dissertation embodying the results of original re- 
search and defend it in a public oral examination. This dissertation must be 
completed within three calendar years after passing the qualifying examina- 
tion, unless an extension is granted by the departmental graduate committee. 

History Conrses 

101a, 102b. The Essentials of European History (3-0-3 each semester). 

Why has the world been so thoroughly reshaped by the European experience? A compre- 
hensive attempt to answer that question. Mr. Stokes, Staff 

105a, 106b. Varieties of the American Experience (3-0-3 each semester). 
Interpretive approaches to American history. 

Mr. Gruber. Mr. Higginbotham, Mr. Matut^ow, Staff 
201a. Ancient History (3-0-3). 

History of the ancient Near East, Greece, the Roman Republic, and the Early Empire. 

Mrs. Drew 
202b. Medieval History (3-0-3). 

A study of the late Roman Empire and the Middle Ages. Mns. Drew 

211, 212. American Thought and Society (3-0-3 each semester).! 

A topical introductory survey of American history, primarily concerned with intellectual 
and social developments underlying surface events. Mr. Haakell 



202 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



223a, 224b. History of Science (3-0-3 each semester). 

A broad survey of the development of scientific ideas and methods from the ancient Greeks 
to the beginning of the twentieth century. Mr. Van Helden 

250b. Chinese Culture: Past and Present (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the philosophy, religion, literature, arts, and social customs of China. 

Mr. Smith 
293b. The Art of War from Alexander to Napoleon (3-0-3). 

The theory and practice of warfare from the classical age to the early nineteenth century. 

Mr. Gruber 

297a, 298b. Constitutional and Legal History of the United States (3-0-3 

each semester). 

Major questions in the historical development of American law and governing institutions. 

Mr. Hyman 
303a, 304b. Independent Readings (3-0-3 each semester). 

Independent reading under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to a limited number 
of advanced students with special permission. Staff 

309, 310. American Thought and Society (3-0-3 each semester).! 

An enriched version of History 211, 212. Students may not receive credit for both 211, 212 
and 309, 310. Mr.' Haskell 

312. Readings in the History of the Black American (3-0-3).t 

Discussion, written and oral reports of selected reading. Mr. Higginhotham 

317. America's Alternatives (3-0-3).t 

Major public policy decisions from the beginning of the national period to the present. 

Mr. Hyman 
319a. America in the Sixties (3-0-3). 

An examination of the major social, political, and economic developments of the sixties. 

Mr. Matusow 

333. Martin Luther and the Reformation in Germany, 1517-1555 (3-0-3).t 

An analysis of the Protestant Reformation as one of the decisive events in German history. 

Mr. Gar side 

334. Calvin and Geneva, 1509-1564 (3-0-3).t 

The intellectual and religious development of Calvin and the Reformation in Geneva. 

•Mr. Gamide 
337. History of the Ancient and Medieval Law (3-0-3).t 

Ancient law focusing on imperial Roman law and the various forms of medieval law: vulgar 
Roman law, barbarian Germanic law, and English common law. Mrs. Drew 

338b. English Legal History (3-0-3). 

Major topics in English legal history since the Middle Ages. The law as a mirror of social 
and political developments. Mr. Wiener 

341a. History of China to 1800 (3-0-3). 

Survey of Chinese history from antiquity to about 1800, highlighting salient aspects of 
China's heritage. Mr. Smith 

342b. History of China Since 1800 (3-0-3). 

China's revolutionary transformation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries — from 
Ch'ing dynasty to People's Republic. Mr. Smith 

345. Medieval and Early Modern Russia (3-0-3).t 

The history of Russia from the ninth century to the Crimean War. Mr. Stokes 

346a. The Russian Revolution (3-0-3). 

The history of the Russian Revolution in its broadest sense, Marx through 1984. Mr. Stokes 

349. Nineteenth-Century Europe (3-0-3).t 

An advanced survey of European history from the Congress of Vienna until World War I. 

Mr. Rath 

350a. Twentieth-Century Europe (3-0-3). 

An advanced survey of European history from the outbreak of World War I to the present. 

Mr. Rath 



HISTORY 203 



353a. The Comparative Modernization of China and Japan (3-0-3). 

A comparative study of social, political, and intellectual change in China and Japan from 
1800 to 1945. ' Mr. Smith 

361a. The History of England to 1776 (3-0-3). 

A survey of English history: England's change from a medieval backwater into the most 
advanced country in the world. Mr. Wieyier 

362b. The History of England Since 1776 (3-0-3). 

England as the world's first industrial society and the political, social, and intellectual 
implications. Mr. Wiener 

367a. History of British Cities (3-0-3). 

The evolution of urban life in the world's first urban nation, especially during the past 200 
years. Mr. Wiener 

370a. The History of Medicine (3-0-3). 

Changing concepts of health and disease from antiquity to the present and the rise of the 
modern health-care profession. Mr. Van Helden 

371a. France from the Enlightenment to the Third Republic (3-0-3). 

The place of the French Revolution in the evolution of French history from the mid- 
eighteenth century to 1870. Mr. Miller 

372b. France from the Third Republic to the Present (3-0-3). 

A study of continuity and change as France enters the twentieth century. Mr. Miller 

375. Germany from the Middle Ages to the Nineteenth Century (3-0-3).t 

A survey of German history from the decline of the Holy Roman Empire to the emergence 
of Bismarck. Mr. Loewenheim 

376. Germany from Bismarck to the Present (3-0-3).t 

A survey of German history from the Prussian constitutional conflict to a reassessment of 
German politics, culture, and society after World War H. Mr. Loewenheim 

382. History of American Cities (3-0-3).t 

Aspects of American urban development, eighteenth century through the present, with 
stress on constitutional, institutional, and social considerations. Mr. Hyman 

384. Readings in the History of Science (3-0-3).t 

Major problems in the history of science and their treatment by historians of science. 

Mr. Van Helden 
386. The Scientific Revolution (3-0-3).t 

Developments in science between 1500 and 1800. Mr. Van Helden 

392. Europe in the Age of the Democratic Revolution (3-0-3).t 

Ideas, politics, and international relations in Europe from George III to Congress of 
Vienna, with emphasis on England and France. Mr. Gruber 

393b. The Art of War from Alexander to Napoleon (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 293. Students may not receive credit for both 293 and 393. 

Mr. Gruber 

395. A History of the South (3-0-3).t 

The life and economy of the Southern people from the Colonial period. Staff 

397a, 398b. Constitutional and Legal History of the United States (3-0-3 

each semester). 

An enriched version of History 297, 298. Students may not receive credit for both 297, 298 
and 397, 398. Mr. Hyman 

403a, 404b. Senior Thesis (0-0-3 each semester). 

Open to well qualified students with special permission. Students must take both History 
403 and 404 to gain credit. Staff 

412b. The Early Republic (3-0-3). 

The development of the United States from 1789 to 1848 with particular emphasis on 
political ideas and practices. Mr. Higginbotham 



204 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



421. Chinese Communism (3-0-3).t 

Development of Marxism in China from 1911 througii the Great Proletarian Revolution of 
1966-1969. Mr. Smith 

425a. Crises in American Foreign Policy: The United States and Vietnam 

(3-0-3). 

Research seminar on both the American role in the Vietnamese civil war since 1945 and the 
impact of the war on American society. Mr. Matusow 

426b. America in the 1960's — Seminar (3-0-3). 

Research seminar on political, economic, and social topics. Open to all undergraduates. 

Mr. Mat u sow 

428. Problems in American Social and Intellectual History (3-0-3).t 

Mr. Haskell 

433a. Renaissance Humanism: From Petrarch to Machiavelli (3-0-3). 

Studies in the transmission of the classical tradition in Italy in the fourteenth, fifteenth, 
and early sixteenth centuries. Mr. GarKide 

434b. Humanism in the Sixteenth Century (3-0-3). 

The classical tradition in Northern Europe and its relationship to religious reform and the 
origins of modern science. Mr. Garside 

440a. Social and Economic History of Europe in the Middle Ages (3-0-3). 

Seminar covering selected problems in the social and economic history of medieval Europe. 

Mrs. Drew 
442b. History of Astronomy and Cosmology (3-0-3). 

History of astronomy and cosmology from antiquity to about 1850. Mr. Vayi Helden 

446a. Twentieth-Century Military Biography (3-0-3). 

Biographies of selected world military leaders from the 1890s through World War II. 

Mr. Vandiver 
448. Military History of the United States (3-0-3).t 

American Wars from the Revolution through World War II. Mr. Vandiver 

450b. Chinese Culture: Past and Present (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 250. Students may not receive credit for both History 250 
and 450. Mr. •Smith 

453. Balkan History (3-0-3).t 

Rumania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Albania, Greece, and Turkey from the Byzantine period 
to the present. Mi: Stokes 

455a. Europe from Bismarck to the First World War (3-0-3). 

Aspects of Europe, 1871-1914, with special attention to Mazzini, Gladstone, Bismarck, and 
Burckhardt. Mr. Loewenheim 

456. Europe and World Politics from Sarajevo to Pearl Harbor (3-0-3).t 

Europe from 1914 to 1945 with special attention to the historic role of the United States in 

world affairs. Mr. Loewenheim 

458b. Problems in Russian and East European History (3-0-3). 

Selected topics from nineteenth and twentieth-century Russia and Eastern Europe. Pre- 
requisite: Russian or Balkan history or consent of instructor. Mr. Stokes 

460. Europe and World Politics from Pearl Harbor to the Present (3-0-3).t 

The aftermath of World War II. the Cold War, the era of Vietnam, and after. Special atten- 
tion to role of the United States in world affairs. Mr. Loewenheim 

461. The Age of Bismarck (3-0-3).t 

The man and his time; ways he changed the course of Prussian, German, and European 
history. Mr. Loewenheim 

462b. Hitler, Europe, and the World (3-0-3). 

How and why Hitler and National Socialism took over Germany, conquered most of 
Europe, and finally met defeat and destruction. Mr. Loewenheim 

463a, 464b. Truman, Stalin and the World: From Yalta to Korea; I, H 

(3-0-3 each semester). 

The turbulent world from the death of F.D. Roosevelt to Korean War. Mr. Loewenheim 



HISTORY 205 

465a. Colonial America to 1754 (3-0-3). 

The growth of society, throught, and politics in the English colonies of North America. 
Lectures, discussions, and papers. Mr. Gruher 

466b. The American Revolution, 1754-1789 (3-0-3). 

The origins and implications of the American Revolution, emphasizing constitutional, 
social, and political developments. Mr. Gruber 

471a. Change and Conflict in an Industrialising Setting (3-0-3). 

The industrialising experience and working class response in nineteenth-century Western 
Europe. Mr. Miller 

475. The History of Central Europe Before 1815 (3-0-3).t 

A survey of the main phases of the history of Central Europe from ancient times to 1815. 

Mr. Rath 

476. The History of Central Europe Since 1815 (3-0-3).t 

Main trends in the history of Central Europe from 1815 to the present. Mr. Rath 

478. Nationalism (3-0-3).t 

Pro-seminar in historical problems related to nationalism. Mr. Stokes 

480b. History of the Modern Business Enterprise (3-0-3). 

The emergence of big business in America and Western Europe. Mr. Miller 

482. Modernization in Historical Perspective (3-0-3).t 

The rise of industrial society in Europe, America, and the non- Western world since 1800. 

Mr. Wiener 

493. Comparative Studies in Russian and Chinese History (3-0-3).t 

Investigation of problems common to Chinese and Russian experience with emphasis on 
modernization. Prerequisite: Russian or Chinese history. Mr. Smith, Mr. Stokes 

495b. Civil War and Reconstruction (3-0-3). 

A study of the background of the War, the course of the War itself, and the economic and 
social consequences of the War. Mr. Vandiver 

496. Civil War and Reconstruction (3-0-3).t 

A continuation of History 495. !:v .,■ Mr. Vandiver 

501a, 502b. Historical Research (Credit variable). 

Master's thesis. Students must take both History 501 and 502 in order to grain credit. Staff 

511a, 512b. Directed Reading in American History I (0-0-3 each semester). 
For graduate students only. Staff 

513a, 514b. Directed Reading in American History H (0-0-3 each semester). 
For graduate students only. Staff 

517a, 518b. Directed Reading in History of Science, Technology, and 
Medicine (0-0-3 each semester). 

For graduate students only. Staff 

521a, 522b. Directed Reading in Medieval History (0-0-3 each semester). 

For graduate students only. Staff 

527a, 528b. Directed Reading in Non- Western History (0-0-3 each semester). 

For graduate students only. Staff 

529a, 530b. Directed Reading in Modern European History I (0-0-3 each 
semester). 
For graduate students only. Staff 

531a, 532b. Directed Reading in Modern European History II (0-0-3 each 
semester). 
For graduate students only. Staff 

533a. Colloquium in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century European 
History. (3-0-3). 

A critical examination of the chief historical trends and main literature in the field. 

Mr. Rath 



206 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

534. Colloquium in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century European 

History (3-0-3).t 

Continuation of History 533. Mr. Rath 

545. Historiography (3-0-3).t 

Seminar in historical method and issues. Undergraduates admitted with special per- 
mission. Mr. Haf<kell 

555, 556. Seminar in German History (3-0-3 each semester).t 

Frederick the Great, Bismarck, and Hitler. Studies in the history of the German political 
tradition. Mr. Loewenheim 

565a. Seminar in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century European 
History (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in nineteenth- and twentieth-century European history. Qualified under- 
graduates admitted by special permission. Mr. Rath 

566. Seminar in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century European History 

(3-0-3).t 

Continuation of History 565. Mr. Rath 

571a, 572b. Seminar in First World War (3-0-3 each semester). 

Studies in the causes of World War I and the course of the war itself. Open to properly 
qualified graduate students after consultation with the instructor. Mr. Vandiver 

573, 574. War and Society (3-0-3 each semester).t 
War as a perennial agent of major social change. 

585a, 586b. Seminar in United States Constitutional and Legal History 

(3-0-3 each semester). 

Significant constitutional and legal questions stressing civil liberties, criminal law, civil- 
military relations, race relations, urban problems. Mr. Hijman 

601a, 602b. Historical Research (Credit variable). 

Doctoral dissertation. May be repeated for credit. Staff 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. Staff 

701a, 702b. Historical Research. 

Doctoral dissertation. For students not in residence. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 



Legal Studies 



Degree offered: B.A. 

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major in Legal Studies. 

Students majoring in legal studies are required to take the following eight 
courses: Economics 438; History 297 or 397, 298 or 398; Philosophy 307, 316; 
Political Science 309, 326, 310 or 321. In addition, students must take four of 
the following electives: Anthropology 371; Economics 436, 461, 483; Environ- 
mental Science and Engineering 401; History 337, 338; Legal Studies 201, 202. 
401, 402; Philosophy 101, 314; Political Science 315, 321, 325, 337, 410; 
Psychology 444; Sociology 321. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 
60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program 
of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 



LEGAL STUDIES 207 



Legal Studies Courses 

201a, 202b. Introduction to Legal Studies I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the law as a fundamental social institution 
and of the values it embodies. Staff 

401a, 402b. Senior Seminar I, II (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

Linguistics 

Associate Professor Copeland, Chairman; Professor Tyler 
Associate Professors P. W. Davis, R. G. Jones, and Urrutibeheity 

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major in Linguistics. Students 
majoring in linguistics are req-uired to take a total of thirty semester hours (ten 
courses) in linguistics, of which twenty-four semester hours (eight courses) 
must be on the 300 level or above. All majors are required to take Linguistics 
201, 202, or the equivalent. With the approval of the major adviser, related 
courses offered by other departments may be taken for credit toward fulfill- 
ment of the requirements in linguistics. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students 
must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 
60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program 
of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Linguistics Courses 

201a. Introduction to General Linguistics (3-0-3). 

The study of language and linguistics including basic synchronic concepts and techniques: 
phonetic transcription, phonological, grammatical, and semantic systems. Also offered as 
Anthropologj' 207. Mr. /)«/'/.s- 

202b. Introduction to General Linguistics (3-0-3). 

A continuation of the above with an introduction to diachronic linguistics and methods in 
linguistic prehistory. Also offered as Anthropology 208. Mr. Dari>^ 

300. Language and Communication Codes (3-0-3). t 

Language and its relation to animal communication; human social codes: propaganda, 
politics and exploitation: artistic expression: sex: pathological states: myth. 

301b. Phonological Analysis (3-0-3). 

Techniques, assumptions of phonological analysis; various phonological theories current in 
modern linguistics. Prerequisite: Linguistics 201, 202 or consent of instructor. Also offered as 
Anthropology 304. Mr. Dari.^ 

302. Syntactic Analysis (3-0-3).t 

The theory and techniques of syntactic analysis. Prerequisite: Linguistics 20L 202 or consent 
of instructor. Also offered as Anthropology 302. 

303a. Modern Linguistic Theory (3-0-3). 

A survey of the development of linguistic theory from de Saussure to the present. Prereq- 
uisite: Linguistics 201, 202 or consent of instructor. Also offered as Anthropology 303. Mr. Davis 

305. Historical Linguistics (3-0-3).t 

Language change in terms of transformational generative grammar, social and geographical 
context, and process of language acquisition. Also listed as Anthropology 305. 

310. Language and Culture (3-0-3).t 

Investigates the systematic relations between linguistic form and expression and culture. 
Also offered as Anthropology 313. 

401a, 402b. Independent Study in Linguistics (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 



208 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

405. Applied Linguistics (3-0-3).t 

The relation of structural linguistics to the teaching of modern languages. Prerequisite: 
Linguistics 201, 202, or consent of instructor. 

406. Field Methods and Analytic Techniques (4-0-4).t 

The techniques of observation, analysis, and recording of human language. Prerequisite: 
Linguistics 201, 202, or consent of instructor. Also offered as Anthropology 403. 

409a. Special Topics in Linguistics (3-0-3). 

Topics will change from year to year, to include such subjects as mathematical and computa- 
tional linguistics, transformational grammar, stratificational theory, tragmetic theory, the 
history of linguistics, acoustic phonetics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Linguistics 
201, 202, or consent of instructor. Mr. Copeland 

410b. Cognitive Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Relations between thought, language, and culture. Systems of folk classification and the 
logical principles underlying them. Also offered as Anthropology 406. Mr. Tyler 

412b. Linguistic Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Linguistic theory and method in the analysis of cultural materials. Also offered as Anthro- 
pology 508. " Mr. Tyler 

466. Philosophy of Language (3-0-3).t 

Nature and use of language; such notions as analyticity, meaning, reference, speech act. 
Also offered as Philosophy 466. Prerequisite: two courses in linguistics or philosophy. 



Mathematical Sciences 



Professor Tapia, Chairman; Professors Bowen, S. H. Davis, de Figueiredo, 
Kilpatrick, Michel, Miele, Pfeiffer, Rachford, Schum, Thrall, 

J. R. Thompson, Wang, Wilhoit, and Young 

Adjunct Professors B.W. Brown, Cardus, Downs, Frankowski, 

Gehan, Gorry, Jansson, Sperling, and Zimmerman 

Associate Professors Kennedy, Lutes, and Wheeler 

Adjunct Associate Professors Forthofer, Hacker, Hsi, 

and Kapadia 

Assistant Professor Blattner 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Herson, Johnston, and Thames 

Lecturer Campise 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A.Ma.Sc, M.A., Ph.D. 

The Undergraduate Program allows students considerable freedom to 
plan a course of study consistent with their particular interests in mathematics 
and its applications. Available courses provide foundations for applications to 
many fields of engineering, physical sciences, life sciences, behavioral and 
social sciences, and computer science. 

Within the flexible framework of university requirements, the program 
consists of three parts: (1) basic courses in mathematics and computer science, 
(2) introductory courses in appropriate areas of mathematical sciences, and (3) 
electives for which major credit is given. 
1. Students normally take eight basic courses, as follows: 

Elementary analysis: Mathematics 101, 102 or honors equivalent 
Differential equations: Mathematics 211 or more advanced introduction 
Multivariable calculus: Mathematics 212 

Linear algebra: Mathematics 355 or Mathematical Sciences 310 
Algebraic structures: Mathematics 356 or 463 or Mathematical Sciences 316 
or 411. 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 209 

Computer science: Mathematical Sciences 220 or 222 or 223 or approved 

alternate 
Model building: Mathematical Sciences 300 or 301 or approved alternate 

2. Students also take one course in three of the following areas: 
Computer science: Mathematical Sciences 320 or 321 
Numerical analysis: Mathematical Sciences 353, 451, or 452 
Operations research and optimization: Mathematical Sciences 460, 463, 464, 

471, 472, or 476 

Physical mathematics: Mathematical Sciences 330, 340, or 343 or Mathe- 
matics 381 or 382 or approved alternate 

Probability and statistics: Mathematical Sciences 380 or 381 

3. Students also take seven elective courses for credit toward the mathematical 
sciences major, as follows: 

Two additional courses in one of the areas selected above, but not limited to 

the courses listed above 
At least one additional course in mathematics or mathematical sciences 
At least four courses in fields where mathematics may be applied 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semes- 
ter hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of at least 
120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 50 and 51. 

A student contemplating work in mathematical sciences is encouraged to 
contact any member of the department, particularly the members of its under- 
graduate committee, who will help the student explore possible programs 
suited to individual needs and interests. 

The Department of Mathematical Sciences participates in the inter- 
departmental program in managerial studies. More information may be ob- 
tained from the description on page 55. Interested students may consult with the 
departmental adviser for this program. 

The Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in mathematical 
sciences is open to qualified students holding bachelor's or master's degrees (or 
their equivalent) in engineering, mathematics, or physical, biological, mathe- 
matical, or behavioral sciences. The credentials of each applicant will receive 
individual evaluation by the faculty of the department. An applicant holding 
only a bachelor's degree should submit quantitative and verbal scores from the 
Graduate Record Examination when requesting application forms. 

The graduate program is designed for students seeking the professional 
degree of Master in Applied Mathematical Sciences or the research degrees of 
Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. It normally takes one or two years to 
obtain a master's and three or four years to obtain a Ph.D. degree. A master's 
degree is not a prerequisite for the Ph.D. degree. 

The professional degree emphasizes the applied aspects of the mathemat- 
ical sciences. This degree is intended for persons who plan careers as prac- 
titioners rather than primarily as researchers. Presently this degree empha- 
sizes the following areas, singly or in combination: (1) computer science, (2) 
statistics, (3) operations research, (4) numerical analysis. Further information 
about this degree may be obtained from the department. 

The granting of a research degree presupposes demonstrated ability to do 
advanced original research. Students are encouraged to initiate research activi- 
ties at the earliest possible time in their graduate study. Presently the research 
interests of the faculty are in the following five major areas: (1) computer 
science and numerical analysis, (2) statistics and probability, (3) operations 



210 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



research and game theory, (4) systems and control theory, (5) mathematical 
models in physical, biological, or behavioral sciences. Further information 
about these areas may be obtained from the department. 

Graduate fellowships, research assistantships, and graduate scholarships 
are available and are awarded on the basis of merit to qualified students. 
Current practice in the department is for most doctoral students of good 
standing to receive some financial aid. As an integral part of their scholastic 
programs, all graduate students are expected to attain some proficiency in 
teaching by engaging in instructional assignments of the department. 

The Master in Applied Mathematical Sciences requires satisfactory 
completion of at least thirty semester hours approved by the department. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree: 

1. Satisfactory completion of at least thirty semester hours (including thesis) at 
the graduate level. Normally five courses must be in mathematical sciences. 
Specific courses of study should be formulated in consultation with the 
student's adviser and must be approved by the department. 

2. An original thesis acceptable to the department; note, however, that success- 
ful performance on the qualifying examination fulfills the master's thesis 
requirement for a student working toward the Ph.D. degree 

3. Satisfactory performance on a public oral examination on the thesis; the pro- 
cedure for the public oral examination is given in the general rules of the 
university 

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: 

1. Satisfactory completion of courses of study approved by the department. At 
least two courses outside the department are required. 

2. Satisfactory performance on preliminary and qualifying examinations and 
reviews 

3. Satisfactory completion of two semester courses or a reading examination on 
an approved foreign language 

4. An original thesis acceptable to the department 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final public oral examination on the thesis. 
The procedure is given in the general rules of the university. 

Mathematical Sciences Courses 

Note: Only one of the courses Mathematical Sciences/Electrical Engineering 
220, 221, 222, 223, or Engineering 240 may be taken for credit. 

220a,b. Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to programming: in PL/1 for students in computer science 
and engineering. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 220. Staff 

221a,b. Digital Computing in the Humanities and Social Sciences (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to programming in PL/1 with emphasis on problems from 
the humanities and social sciences. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 221. Staff 

222a,b. Introduction to Business Data Processing (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to programming in PL/1, with emphasis on business applica- 
tions and problems. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 222. Staff 

223a,b. Introduction to Computing (3-3-4). 

A semi-self-paced introduction to computer solution of equations using APL and PL/1. Also 
offered as Electrical Engineering 223. Staff 

280a,b. Elementary Applied Statistics (3-0-3). 

A noncalculus introduction to statistics for students with interests in the social sciences. 

Mr. Scott. Mr. Thompson 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 211 

300b. Model Building- (3-0-3). 

Examples to illustrate mathematical formulation (modeling) of scientific problems, their 
solution and interpretation. Emphasis on physical science models. Staff 

301a. Model Building (3-0-3). 

Same as Mathematical Sciences 300 except emphasis is on behavioral science models. Staff 

310b. Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

Concepts and results of linear algebra useful in a variety of fields of application. 

Mr. Thrall. Staff 

316a. Introduction to Discrete Structures (3-0-3). 

Set theory, relations, mappings: algebraic systems such as semigroups, groups, rings, fields, 
graph theory. Boolean algebra, and propositional logic. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 
316. Mr. Thrall 

320a,b. Computer Organization and Software (3-3-4). 

Basic computer architecture. System software, including loaders, assemblers, and operating 
systems. Advanced programming techniques. Micro-programming. Input-output. Also offered 
as Electrical Engineering 320. Staff 

321a,b. Advanced Programming (3-3-4). 

Advanced programming methods, includingstructured programming, team programming, 
data structures, searching and sorting, data management, and information retrieval. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematical Sciences 220. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 321. 

Ms. Blattner, Staff 

322a. Introduction to Management Information Systems (3-0-3). 

Basic concepts for development and implementation of computer-based management 
systems. Field assignments in local industry. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 222. Also 
offered as Electrical Engineering 322. Mr. Campise 

330a,b. Complex Variables (3-0-3). 

Discussion of the basic concepts of complex variable theory, and applications to the solution 
of physical problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. Mr. Wang, Mi: Davis 

340b. Partial Differential Equations for Engineers and Scientists (3-0-3). 

Elementary methods for the solution of partial differential equations and boundary value 
problems in engineering and physical sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. Mr. Wilhoit 

343a. Partial Differential Equations and Complex Variables for Engineers 

and Scientists (4-0-4). 

Standard methods of solution for partial differential equations of mathematical physics. 
Introduction to functions of a complex variable and Laplace transform. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 211. Mr. Bowen 

353a, b. Topics in Computational Numerical Analysis with Computer 
Laboratory (3-1-3). 

An introductory course in numerical analysis with computer applications. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 211. Staff Mr.^. Wheeler 

376a. Quantitative Analysis in Managerial Decisions (3-0-3). 

Mathematical models in deterministic and stochastic situations, including linear pro- 
ramming, inventory theory, decision theory, waiting line theory. Prerequisite: one year of college 
mathematics and statistics course. Also offered as Accounting 376. Mr. Thrall 

380a. Introduction to Probability (3-0-3). 

An introduction to probability for students in the behavioral, social, and biological sciences. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 102 or 103. Mr. Schum 

381a,b. Introduction to Applied Probability (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the concepts, interpretations, elementary techniques, and applications of 
modern probability theory, including a brief introduction to statistical inference. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 102. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 331. Mr. Lutein. Mr. Pfeiffer 

400a,b. Advanced Model Building (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Mathematical Sciences 300 or 301, with an increased emphasis on the mathe- 
matical solution phase. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Staff 



212 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

411a. Group Theory for Chemists and Physicists I (3-0-3). 

Symmetries of physical laws and structures and associated transformation groups. Applica- 
tions to problems in atomic, solid state, and molecular physics and chemistry. Prerequisite: 
Linear algebra and elementary quantum mechanics. Mr. KHpatrick 

412. Group Theory for Chemists and Physicists II (3-0-3).t 
Continuation of Mathematical Sciences 411. 

416b. Automata and Formal Languages (3-0-3). 

Finite automata, regular expressions, regular languages, pushdown automata, context-free 
languages, Turing machines, recursive languages, computability, and solvability. Prerequisite; 
Mathematical Sciences 316. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 416. M.s. Blattner 

417. Combinational Analysis (3-0-3).t 

Solution of enumeration problems, using the methods of inclusion and exclusion and generat- 
ing functions, distributions, permutations, graphical enumeration. Mr. Kilpatrick 

420b. Algorithms and Data Structures (3-3-4). 

The design and analysis of computer algorithms. Models of computation, data structures, 
and efficiency considerations. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 316, 321. Also offered as 
Electrical Engineering 420. Mr. Hir.'<chht'rg 

421a. Systems Programming (3-3-4). 

Introduction to the design and construction of important software systems programs, in- 
cluding assemblers, compilers, and operating systems. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 
316. 320, 321. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 421. Mr. Hirschberg 

422b. Case Studies in Management Information Systems and Data Pro- 
cessing (3-0-3). 

Case studies. Semester project includes building a decision model and making computer 
runs to obtain recommended policy decisions. Mr. Cnmpit^e 

432b. Tensor Analysis (3-0-3). 

Reviewof linear algebra. Tensor algebra. Tensor analysis on Euclidean spaces. Applications 
to particle mechanics, continuum mechanics, and electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite: Linear 
algebra. Mr. Wang 

440a. Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering (3-0-3). 

Application of linear operator theory and transform techniques in the solution of ordinary 
and partial differential equations of engineering and mathematical physics. Prerequisite: 
Mathematical Sciences 330. Mr. Hill 

451a. Computational Methods and Analysis in Numerical Linear Algebra 

(3-0-3). 

A study of numerical methods in linear algebra. Mr. Rachford 

452b. Computational Methods for Differential Equations with Computer 

Laboratory (3-3-4). 

Finite difference, variational, and collocation methods for approximating numerically solu- 
tions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Computer implementation to verify con- 
vergence to the solution. A/r.s-. Wtieeler 

453. Methods and Analysis in Ordinary Differential Equations (3-0-3).t 

Several popular methods for solving systems of differential equations, including analysis of 
methods of quadrature and methods for integral equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. Staff 

454b. Computational Methods in Nonlinear Systems (3-0-3). 

Analysis and computer applications of modern methods for solving nonlinear algebraic 
systems and nonlinear constrained optimization problems in R". Prerequisite: Mathematics 211, 
212, and linear algebra. Mr. Tapia 

460a. Foundations of Optimization Theory (3-0-3). 

Derivation and application of necessity conditions and sufficiency conditions for constrained 
optimization problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 212. Mr. Tapia 

463a. Minimization of Functions (3-0-3). 

Theory of maxima and minima. Analytical methods. Numerical methods. Also offered as 
Mechanical Engineering 463. Mr. Miele 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 213 

464b. Minimization of Functionals (3-0-3). 

Optimal control theory. Calculus of variations. Analytical methods. Numerical methods. 
Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 464 . Mr. Miele 

471a. Linear Programming (3-0-3). 

Formulation of managerial and technical problems; simplex method: revised simplex 
method; duality theory and applications; transportation problems; decomposition techniques. 
Also offered as Economics 471. Mr. Young 

472. Game Theory (3-0-3).t 

Matrix games; the minimax theorem; relation to linear programming. Continuous games; 
multi-stage games. Differential games. Staff 

475. Operations Research, Deterministic Models (3-0-3).t 

Optimization problems in a managerial and economic context. Familiarity with linear 
programming and microeconomic theory is strongly recommended. Also offered as Economics 

475. Mr. Young 

476b. Operations Research, Stochastic Models (3-0-3). 

Decision theory, waiting-in-line theory. Markov chains, inventory models, replacement 
models, simulation. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 380 or 381. Also offered as Economics 

476. Staff 

477b. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory I (3-0-3). 

Exposition of the theory of competitive economies from a mathematical perspective, uni- 
fying calculus, matrix algebra, and set-theoretic approaches. Prerequisite: Economics 211, 
Mathematics 212, Mathematical Sciences 310. Also offered as Economics 477. Mr. Brito 

478. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory II (3-0-3).t 

Continuation of Economics/Mathematical Sciences 477, which is a prerequisite. Also offered 
as Economics 478. Mr. Pomerij 

480b. Introduction to Statistical Method (3-0-3). 

A survey of distribution theory, estimation theory, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: 
Mathematical Sciences 380 or 381. Mr. Scott 

481a. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3-0-3). 

Intended for students contemplating advanced study in statistical theory. Prerequisite: 
Mathematical Sciences 380 or 381. Mr. Thompfton 

482a. Introduction to Mathematical Probability (3-0-3). 

Measure-theoretic foundations of probability theory for students who need access to ad- 
vanced mathematical literature in applied probability. Mr. Pfeiffer 

483a. Markov and Related Processes (3-0-3). 

Conditional expectation and conditional independence: Poisson processes: Markov chains; 
continuous-parameter Markov processes; renewal processes. Prerequisite: Mathematical 
Sciences 380 or 381. Mr. Pfeiffer 

484b. Second-order Random Processes (3-0-3). 

An introduction to second-order random processes. Covariance analysis; spectral repre- 
sentation; mean-square calculus: Hilbert space ideas and linear estimation. Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 211, 212, and Mathematical Sciences 380 or 381. Mr. Pfeiffer 

The following three courses are offered occasionally by CAMS (Houston 
Council for Applied Mathematical Sciences). 

486a. Linear Models (3-0-3). 

Univariate distribution theory and inference. Multivariate normal distribution. Multiple 
and partial correlation. Wishart distribution. Prerequisite; Linear algebra and one year of 
probability and statistics. Staff 

487b. Multivariate Analysis (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Mathematical Sciences 486. Hotelling's T^. Fisher's linear discriminant 
function. Principal component analysis. Multivariate analysis of variance. Multivariate non- 
normal distributions. Staff 

488. Bayesian Foundations of Statistical Inference (3-0-3).t 

Bayes' theorem; vague prior knowledge; inference for multivariate distributions; approxi- 
mation methods; natural conjugate priors; likelihood principle. Staff 



214 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

490a, 491b. Independent Study in Mathematical Sciences (Credit 

variable). staff 

492a/b, 493a/b. Computer Science Special Projects (1-6-3 each semester). 
Independent and group work on large software systems. Complete implementations, in- 
eluding programming, debugging, verification, and documentation. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. Mr. Kennedy. Ms. Blattner 

516. Theory of Parallel Computation and Concurrent Systems (3-0-3).t 
Computer graphs, computational schemata, Petre nets, asynchronous and concurrent con- 
trol structures, determinism deadlock, and synchronization problems. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matical Sciences 416. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 516. Mr. Jump 

517. Topics in Automata Theory (3-0-3).t 

Topics such as algebraic structure of machines. Krohn-Rhodes decomposition, probabilistic 
automata, a-transducers, and tree automata. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 416. Also 
offered as Electrical Engineering 517. M.s'. Blattner 

518a. Analysis Techniques for Combinatorial Algorithms (3-0-3). 

Introduction to concepts of problem complexity and analysis of algorithms to find bounds on 
complexity. Reducibility among combinatorial problems and approximation algorithms for 
"hard" problems. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 416, 420. Also offered as Electrical 
Engineering 518. Mr. Hirxchberg 

520a. Operating Systems (3-3-4). 

Procedure implementation, processes, synchronization and communication, memory 
management, name management, protection, resource allocation, and pragmatic aspects of 
systems building. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 381; 420. Also offered as Electrical 
Engineering 520. Mr. FeuMel 

521b. Artificial Intelligence (3-3-4). 

Techniques for machine simulation of intelligent behavior: problem solving, game playing, 
pattern perception, and automatic programming. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 420 and 
381. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 521. Af.s. Blattner 

523b. Compiler Construction (3-3-4). 

Advanced topics in the design of programming language compilers, including parsing, run- 
time storage management, code generation and optimization, error recovery. Prerequisite: 
Mathematical Sciences 416, 421. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 523. Staff 

533, 534. Advanced Tensor Analysis I, II (3-0-3 each semester).t 

Differential and integral calculus on manifolds. Riemannian geometry. Calculus of varia- 
tions. Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Applications to analytical mechanics, relativity, and continuum 
mechanics. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 423. Mr. Wang 

535, 536. Mathematical Theory of Nonlinear Elasticity I (3-0-3 each 

semester).! 

Representation theory for the constitutive relations for elasticity; homogeneous and in- 
homogeneous bodies; wave propagation; second-order elasticity and approximations. Prereq- 
uisite: Mechanical Engineering 511, 512, or Mathematical Sciences 432. Mr. Wang 

537. Mathematical Theory of Non-Newtonian Fluids (3-0-3).t 

Constitutive relations for materials with memory effects, simple fluids, viscometric flows, 
motions with constant stretch history, fluid crystals, second-order fluids, and other approxima- 
tion methods. Mr. Wang 

540b. Appilied Functional Analysis (3-0-3). 

Applications of basic concepts and theorems in functional analysis to mechanics, quantum 
mechanics, and/or optimal control problems. Mr. Bowen 

541. Partial Differential Equations I (3-0-3).t 

Selected topics from first-order partials; characteristics and classifications: initial value 
problems; boundary-value problems for elliptic equations; Riemann's, Green's, and Neumann's 
functions; and applications. Mr. Bowen 

542b. Partial Differential Equations II (3-0-3). 

Selected topics, arranged in such a way that Mathematical Sciences 541 is not a prerequisite. 

Mr. Wang 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 215 

544b. Mathematical Methods of Physics (3-0-3). 

Selected mathematical techniques useful in the solution of problems in physics and space 
physics. Prerequisite: Physics 301, 302. Mathematical Sciences 440 is desirable. Also offered as 
Space Physics 544. Mr. Hill 

551. Analysis of Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3).t 

Analysis of modern methods, including finite-difference methods, finite-element methods, 
collocation methods, and associated algebraic problems. Also offered as Mathematics 438. 

Mr. Wang 

552b. Approximation Theory (3-0-3). 

Least-squares. Chebyshev, and rational approximations; splines and finite-element sub- 
spaces; degree of approximation and related concepts. Mr. de Figueiredo 

553, 554. Advanced Topics in Numerical Analysis I, II (3-0-3 each semester).t 

The content of the course will vary from year to year at the discretion of the instructor. 

Neither course is a prerequisite for the other. Mrs. Wtieeler. Mr. Wang 

563a. Minimization of Functions (3-0-3). 

Same as Mathematical Sciences 463, with one exception: emphasis is placed on computer 
methods. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 563. Mr. Miele 

564b. Minimization of Functionals (3-0-3). 

Same as Mathematical Sciences 464. with one exception: emphasis is placed on computer 
methods. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 564. Mr. Miele 

571. Topics in Linear Programming (3-0-3). t 

Continuation of Mathematical Sciences 471. Schema and duality; double description of 
classes of convex linear sets; algorithms for problems with special structures; illustrations from 
managerial and technical problems. Mr. Thrall 

572. Topics in Theory of Games (3-0-3).t 

Utility theory; theory of 2-person general-sum games; bargaining and threats. Theory of n- 
person games: solution concepts and extensions. Optional topics. Staff 

573. Nonlinear Programming (3-0-3).t 

Theory and computational methods for nonlinear programming, including: Kuhn-Tucker 
conditions, duality theory, methods for constrained optimization of convex and non-convex 
problems. Also offered as Economics 573. Staff 

574b. Integer Programming (3-0-3). 

Applications theory, and computational methods in pure and mixed integer programming. 
Special problem structures. Mr. Young 

580a,b. Introduction to Statistical Inference (3-0-3). 

A methods course for graduate students with limited mathematical background. Not open to 
mathematical sciences majors. Staff 

581. Estimation Theory (3-0-3).t 

Concepts and criteria in estimation; theory and applications of linear and nonlinear estima- 
tion; Wiener and Kalman filtering; linear and nonlinear system identification. Prerequisite; 
Mathematical Sciences 481. Mr. de Figueiredo 

582. Stochastic Processes (3-0-3).t 

Mathematical foundations for advanced study of applied random processes. Topics such as 
separability and measurability; analytic properties of sample functions; linear transformations; 
independent increments; stochastic integrals. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 482. 

Mr. Pfeiffer 

583b. Detection Theory and Pattern Recognition (3-0-3). 

Decision theory: detection of stochastic signals in colored noise; parametric and nonpara- 
metric approaches to detection and pattern classification. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 
538. Mh. Kazakos 

585a. Information Theory (3-0-3). 

Introduction to information theory concepts. Measures of information. Noiseless coding. The 
discrete, memoryless channel. Error bounds. Techniques of coding and decoding. Convolutional 
codes. Source encoding. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 535. Ms. Kazakos 



216 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Advanced Topics in Theoretical Statistics I, II, III, IV. 

This two-year sequence (Mathematical Sciences 586a, 587b, 588a, 589b will vary from year 
to year. Subjects may include: Monte Carlo techniques, time series analysis, non-parametric 
statistics, hypothesis testing, regression theory. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 480 or 481. 

Mr. Thompson. Mr. Scott 

590a, 591b. Topics in Operations Research (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

592a, 593b. Topics in Applied Mathematics (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

596a, 597b. Special Topics in Mathematical Sciences (3-0-3 each semester). 
Independent study. Staff 

599a,b. Pro-Seminar (3-0-3). 

For predoctoral students in mathematical sciences. Seminar meets weekly for entire year 
and carries total of three hours credit. Mr. Wang 

600a, 601b. Thesis. Staff 

617. Continuum Mechanics I (3-0-3).t 

Advanced topics in continuum mechanics. Theory of constitutive equations. Theories of 
fading memory. Thermodynamics of materials with memory. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engi- 
neering 511, 512. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 617. 

618. Continuum Mechanics II (3-0-3).t 

Recent developments in continuum mechanics. Typical topics: irreversible thermodynamics; 
electromagnetic interaction with general materials: theories of mixtures: continuum dislocation 
theories. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 617. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 618. 

623b. Syntactic and Semantic Elements of Programming Languages (3-3-4). 

Syntactic and metasyntactic definition of languages. Fundamental elements and structures 
of programming languages and their implementation. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 523. 
Also offered as Electrical Engineering 623. Mr. Feu.^tel 

641, 642. Topics in Experimental Design I, II (3-0-3 each semester).t 

Discussion and interpretation of current literature and research relevant to the environ- 
mental sciences. Also offered as Environmental Science and Engineering 641, 642. 

686a, 687b, 688a, 689b. Advanced Topics in Applied Statistics I, II, III, and 

IV (3-0-3 each semester). 

This two-year sequence will vary from year to year. Topics will include bioassay, sampling 
theory, survival studies, experimental design, analysis of variance, data analysis. The courses are 
arranged so that none is a prerequisite to any other, unless noted otherwise. 

700c. Summer Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 

Mathematics 

Professor Wells, Chairman: Professors Bochner, Curtis, Harvey, Hempel, 

Jaco, B. F. Jones, Polking, Rachford, Taylor, and Veech 

Visiting Professor Weinstein 

Visiting Associate Professors Berthier and Calderon 

Assistant Professors Shalen and Stanton 

Instructors Beatrous, Dadok, and Fegan 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major. It is possible to major in 
mathematics in either the science, engineering, or humanities program. There 
are two major programs. 

1. Regular major. Mathematics 101, 102, or 121, 122 and 21 1,212 or 221, 222 
and at least twenty-four semester hours (eight courses) in courses numbered 



MATHEMATICS 217 

300 or above in the Mathematics Department. A student can receive advanced 
placement credit for Mathematics 101 by achieving a score of 4 or 5 on the AP 
AB level test or for Mathematics 101 and 102byachievingascoreof 4or Sonthe 
BC level test. Students who have had calculus but have not taken the AP test 
may petition the Mathematics Department for a waiver of the calculus require- 
ments for a major in mathematics. 

2. Double major. The requirements for the double major are the same as 
above with the exception that up to nine of the twenty-four semester hours 
numbered 300 or above can be replaced by approved mathematics-related 
courses. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in mathematics will be 
granted to a limited number of students who have indicated ability for advanced 
and original work. Normally one or two years are required after the bachelor's 
degree to obtain an M.A. degree and three or four years to obtain a Ph.D. An 
M.A. is not a prerequisite for the Ph.D. 

A number of graduate scholarships and fellowships are available and will 
be awarded on the basis of merit. As part of the graduate education in mathe- 
matics, each graduate student is normally expected to engage in teaching or 
other instructional duties. Generally less than six hours a week is devoted to 
such duties. 

The Qualifying Examinations. The qualifying examinations in mathe- 
matics consist of two parts: the general examination and the advanced exami- 
nation. 

1. The general examination consists of three parts, covering algebra, 
analysis, and topology, respectively. The examination will be given twice a year, 
in mid-September and in mid-January. A student should take this examination 
after the third semester of graduate study or sooner. A student who fails one or 
more parts of the general examination may, with the approval of the depart- 
mental graduate committee, be allowed to retake the appropriate part(s) at the 
next scheduled examination time. A student generally will not be allowed to 
take any part of the general examination more than two times. 

2. Advanced oral examination. After completing the general examination 
the student should prepare for an advanced oral examination by selecting some 
special field (e.g., homotopy theory, several complex variables, group theory, 
etc.), and submitting the topic to the departmental graduate committee for 
approval. The time of the advanced examination will be scheduled by the 
graduate committee, and will normally be within six to nine months after the 
general examination. A student who fails the advanced examination may, with 
the approval of the graduate committee, be allowed to retake it (on the same, or 
possibly a different topic), but will generally not be allowed to take the advanced 
examination more than two times. 

The Master's Degree. Requirements for candidacy for the Master of Arts 

degree: 

1. Satisfactory completion (grade of 2 or better) of a course of study approved 
by the department and fulfillment of the general rules of the university 
(described on page 91). Transfer of credits from another university will be 
allowed only when approved by both the department and the University 
Graduate Council. 



218 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

2. Satisfactory performance on an examination in at least one approved 
foreign language (French, German, or Russian) 

Other requirements for the master's degree may be satisfied in either of the 
following ways: 

1. Completion of all the requirements for qualification as a candidate for the 
Ph.D. degree as given below, or 

2. Presentation and oral defense of an original thesis acceptable to the 
department 

The Ph.D. degree. Requirements for candidacy for the Ph.D. degree: 

1 . Satisfactory completion (grade of 2 or better) of a course of study approved by 
the department. Transfer of credits from another university will be allowed 
only when approved by both the department and the University Graduate 
Council. 

2. Satisfactory performance on both the general and advanced qualifying 
examinations described above 

3. Satisfactory performance on examinations in two approved foreign lan- 
guages (French, German, or Russian) 

Remaining requirements for the Ph.D.: 

1. The writing of an original thesis acceptable to the department 

2. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis 

3. Any other conditions required by the general rules of the university (de- 
scribed on pages 91 to 92). 

Mathematics Courses 

101a,b; 102a,b. Differential and Integral Calculus for Functions of One 

Variable (4-0-4 each semester). 

Includes careful discussion of continuity: sequences, series, and power series. Mathematics 
102 is open to entering freshmen with advanced placement and departmental approval. 

Mr. Pfeiffer. Mr. Veech. Mr. Wellf<, Mr. Taylor. Mr. Beatrous. Mr. Fegan, Mr. Pool 

103a, 106b. Introduction to Calculus and its Applications (3-0-3 each 

semester). 

Emphasis on problem solving and applications. Intended for non-science-engineering 
students. Not open to mathematics majors. Mr. Curtis, Mr. Weinstein 

104b. Finite Mathematics (3-0-3). 

Topics from elementary propositional calculus, partitions and counting, linear program- 
ming. Not open to mathematics majors. Mr. Palmer 

105. Elementary Probability and Combinatorics (3-0-3).t 

Probability theory on discrete sample spaces. Not open to Mathematics majors. 

107, 108. The Role of Mathematics in Civilization (3-0-3 each semester).! 

121a, 122b. Analysis (4-0-4 each semester). 

Covers the material of 101, 102 with emphasis on theoretical aspects. Registration by 
departmental permission. Mr. Jones 

211a. Ordinary Differential Equations (4-0-4). Mr. Dadok, Mr. Hanmj, Mr. Fegan 
212b. Differential and Integral Calculus for Functions of Several Variables 

(4-0-4). Mr. Stanton. Mr. Calderon. Mr. Beatrou.^ 

221a, 222b. Advanced Analysis (3-0-3 each semester). 

Covers the material of Mathematics 211, 212, including an introduction to ordinary differ- 
ential equations. Emphasis is on theoretical aspects. Curves, surfaces, and more general mani- 
folds. Stokes' theorem in detail. Mr. Polking 



MATHEMATICS 219 

312b. Principles of Analysis (3-0-3). 

A careful treatment of: the topology of R", convergence of sequences and series of functions, 
the implicit function theorem, existence theorems for ODE's. and related topics. 

Mr. Wcinntein 

355a. Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

Linear transformations and matrices. Solution of linear equations. The eigenvalue problem 
and quadratic forms. No prerequisites. Students cannot take this course and Mathematics 464. 

Mr. Beatrou.'i 

356b. Abstract Algebra (3-0-3). 

Groups: normal subgroups, factor groups, Abelian groups. Rings: ideals. Euclidean rings, 
unique factorization. Fields: algebraic extensions, finite fields. Note: Students cannot take this 
course and Mathematics 463. Mr. Berthier 

365a. Elementary Number Theory (3-0-3). 

Properties of number depending mainly on the. notion of divisibility. Continued fractions. 

Mr. Fegan 

366b. Projective Geometry (3-0-3). Mr. Berthier 

381a. Analysis and Applications (3-0-3). 

Leplace transform: inverse transform, applications to constant coefficient differential 
equations. Boundary value problems: Fourier series, Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials. 

Mr. Polking 

382b. Complex Analysis and Applications (3-0-3). 

Partial differential equations of mathematical physics: fluid flow, heat flow, telegraph 
equations. Complex analysis: Cauchy integral theorem. Taylor series, residues, evaluation of 
integrals by means of residues, conformal mapping, application to 2-dimensional fluid flow. 

Mr. Calderon 

401a, 402b. Differential Geometry (3-0-3 each semester). 

Differential manifolds. Stokes' Theorem and deRham's Theorem, fundamental theorem of 
local Riemannian geometry. Lie groups, vector bundles, affine connections. Mr. Taylor 

411, 412. Ordinary Differ:ential Equations: Mathematical Physics (3-0-3 

each semester). t 
421, 422. Ordinary Differential Equations: Celestial Mechanics (3-0-3 each 

semester).t 

423a, 424b. Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3 each semester). 

Cauchy-Kowalewski Theorem, first order hyperbolic systems, harmonic functions and 
potential theory, Dirichlet and Neumann problems, integral equations, parabolic and elliptic 
equations. Mr. Dadok 

425a. Real Analysis (3-0-3). 

Lebesque theory of measure and integration. Mr. Jones 

426b. Topics in Real Analysis (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Mathematics 425. Mr. Bochner 

427a, 428b. Complex Analysis (3-0-3 each semester). 

Cauchy-Riemann equations, power series, Cauchy's integral formula, residue calculus, con- 
formal mappings, special topics such as the Riemann mapping theorem, Runge's Theorem, 
elliptic function theory. Mr. Harvey. Mr. Wells 

434. Theory of Special Functions (3-0-3).t 

438a. Computational Methods in Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3). 

Methods of solution: finite-element methods, collocation methods, finite difference methods, 
and associated algebraic problems. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 55L Mr. Wang 

443a. General Topology (3-0-3). 

Basic point set topologv'. Includes set theory, well ordering. Metrization. Mr. Curti.'f 

444b. Geometrical Topology (3-0-3). 

Introduction to algebraic methods in topology and differential topology. Elementary homo- 
topy theory. Covering spaces. Mr. Curtis 



220 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

463a, 464b. Algebra (3-0-3 each semester). 

Groups, rings, fields, vector spaces. Matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, canonical forms, 
multilinear algebra. Structure theorem for finitely generated abelian groups. Mr. Henipel 

466. Cohomology of Groups (3-0-3).t 

490. Supervised Reading in Mathematics (Credit variable). 

521a. Special Topics in Complex Analysis (3-0-3). 

Several complex variables. Mr. Harvey 

523a. Functional Analysis (3-0-3). 

Locally convex spaces, theory of distributions. Branch spaces, Hilbert spaces. Mr. Berthier 

525a, 526b. Advanced Topics in Analysis (3-0-3 each semester). 

Lie groups and Lie algebras. Mr. Stanton 

537a. Algebraic Topology (3-0-3). 

Singular homology and cohomology. Mr. Taylor 

538b. Algebraic Topology (3-0-3). 

Homotopy theory, Serre spectral sequence and applications. Mr. Hempel 

541a, 542b. Advanced Topics in Topology (3-0-3 each semester). 

Topological dynamics and ergodic theory. Mr. Veech 

557, 558. Topics in Algebra (3-0-3 each semester).! 

561, 562. Advanced Topics in Algebra (3-0-3 each semester).t 

601a, 602b. Thesis (Credit variable). 

700c. Summer Research. 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



Military Science 



Chairman to be named 
Assistant Professors Duffy and T.M. Adams 

The Department of Military Science is chaired by a U.S. Army officer, 
assisted by officers and noncommissioned officers of the U.S. Army. Training 
in military leadership is emphasized, with instruction being given in subjects 
common to all branches of the Army. 

The four-year Army ROTC course consists of the basic course taken the 
freshman and sophomore years and the advanced course taken the junior and 
senior years. The Army ROTC also offers a two-year program to those students 
with two years of study remaining who did not participate in the normal basic 
course. In the two-year program, the student attends a six-week summer camp, 
which gives credit for the basic Army ROTC course, and enters the advanced 
course the next fall. The advanced course includes a six-week summer camp, 
normally between the junior and senior years, in practical military instruction. 

One-, two-, and three-year scholarships are available on a competitive 
basis to students who participate in the Army ROTC program. Each scholar- 
ship student receives $100 per month with all tuition, fees, books, and equip- 
ment paid by the Army for the period of the scholarship. Nonscholarship 
students receive $100 per month during the advanced course. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 221 

Graduates of this program are commissioned in the various branches of 
the Army based upon the preference of the individual, academic major, demon- 
strated leadership and technical qualifications, and the needs of the service. 

Military science students are permitted to enroll in a university course in 
lieu of the scheduled military science course according to the following semes- 
ter schedule: 

MS I — second semester (spring) 

MS II — first semester (fall) 

MS III — first semester (fall) 

Approval of the university course desired must be obtained from both the 
university and military science faculty advisers. Military science leadership 
laboratory requirements remain in effect although the cadet is enrolled in a 
university course. See the Schedule of Courses Offered available from the 
Registrar's Office for registration data. 



Military Science Courses 

101a. The Defense Establishment in National Security I (1-2-1). 

Organization of the Department of Defense, structure of ROTC, individual weapons design 
and characteristics, and marksmanship instruction. Staff 

102b. The Defense Establishment in National Security II (1-2-1). 

Study of national defense policy and world-wide implications requiring interdependence of 
the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Staff 

201a. American Military History (3-2-3). 

Analysis of American military history with emphasis on factors leading to organizational 
and social patterns of the modern-day Army. Staff 

202b. Introduction to Tactics and Operations (3-2-3). 

Study of principles involved in combined arms teams, map and aerial-photo readings, and 
the command of troops. Mr. Ada7ns 

301a. Leadership and Management, Fundamentals, and Dynamics of the 
Military Team I (3-2-3). 

Study of leadership qualities, delegation of authority, and the psychological, physiological, 
and sociological factors affecting behavior while in the Army. Mr. Adams 

302b. Leadership and Management, Fundamentals, and Dynamics of the 

Military Team II (3-2-3). 

Study of leadership principles and techniques, military instructional methodology, and the 
history and roles of the various Army branches. Mr. Duffy 

401a. Leadership and Management, Fundamentals, and Dynamics of the 

Military Team III (3-2-3). 

Examination of international affairs and U.S. alliances, command and staff procedures, and 
the military justice system. Mr. Duffy 

402b. Leadership and Management, Fundamentals, and Dynamics of the 

Military Team IV (3-2-3). 

Modern-day warfare techniques are examined in terms of traditional warfare principles and 
technological advancements. Mr. Duffy 



222 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The Shepherd School of Music 



Professor S. Jones, Dean 

Professors P. Cooper, Holloway, Shapiro, and Tipton 

Adjunct Professor Lert 

Associate Professors Grouse, Fliegel, Kurtzman, Milburn, Patterson 

Schnoebelen, and Trepel 

Assistant Professors R.S. Brown, Citron, Ellison, Koehler, and Rosenberg 

Lecturers Arbiter, Bacon, Bible, Ettelson, Deck, Guderian, Norris, 

Pickar, Rose, and Waters 

Instructors Hanson and Gottschalk 

Degrees Offered: B. Mus./M. Mus. (simultaneously); M. Mus. 

The Shepherd School of Music, committed to the professional training of 
musicians within a broad liberal arts curriculum, offers an integrated program 
of performance, creation, and academic study of music from a combined 
historical/theoretical/practical point of view. 

Close rapport exists between the school and Houston's professional musi- 
cal organizations. The apprenticeship programs of the fourth and fifth years 
are designed to meet both educational and professional goals. 

Degrees Offered. A Master of Music degree is offered in the following 
areas: composition, conducting, music history, performance (orchestral in- 
strument, piano, voice), and theory. The master's degree is awarded after 
successful completion of the requirements, electives, apprenticeships, and 
recitals of a five-year program. Because of the accelerated programs in music 
history and theory and the high selectivity of performance majors and applied 
majors, the five-year program is comparable to other programs requiring a 
four-year bachelor's degree and a two-year professional degree. Six years may 
be required to complete the conducting major. 

Admission to these programs is based upon evaluation of a student's 
achievements in one or more of the degree areas. An audition, a theory evalua- 
tion, and a personal interview are required of each applicant. Admission is 
determined jointly by the Shepherd School faculty and by the Admissions 
Committee of Rice University, which bases its evaluation upon successful 
academic achievements and standard college admission indices. 

Transfer students from other colleges, conservatories, and universities 
may apply for admission. These applicants are evaluated in terms of prior 
preparation, which may reduce the required period of study at Rice. 

Curriculum Design. Students must complete satisfactorily 102 semester 
hours (thirty-four courses) in prescribed music courses, appropriate perfor- 
mance and/or thesis requirements, and apprenticeship. 

They must also complete at least 48 semester hours outside the depart- 
mental requirements for a total program of at least 150 semester hours. Distri- 
bution requirements for music majors are discussed on the next page. All 
M. Mus/B. Mus. programs include (1) the core curriculum and (2) a specialized 
curriculum. 

1. The first five semesters consist of core curriculum courses and their applica- 
tion to a principal instrument. Each semester at least three semester hours 
are taken in each of the following areas of study: applied studies (ear- 
training, sight-singing, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, style, performance 
practice, ensemble techniques); historical studies; individual musicianship 
(principal instrument); theoretical studies; and academic distribution 
courses. The typical course of study for the core curriculum is: 



MUSIC 223 

Firi^t and second semesters: 

Individual musicianship (major instrument): Music 211, 212; 221, 222; 231, 

232; and academic electives (English) 
Third and fourth semesters: 
Individual musicianship; Music 311, 312; 321. 322; 331, 332; and academic 

electives 
Fifth semester: 
Individual musicianship; Music 411, 421, 431; and academic elective 

2. The final two years are devoted to specialized curriculum, in which the 
student concentrates on creativity, performance, or research supported by 
laboratory and performing ensembles, theory and history seminars, and 
professional apprenticeships. Apprenticeships encourage a diversity of 
professional activities as appropriate for the individual. These include 
participation with major or civic orchestras, choirs, or opera theaters; off- 
campus solo and small ensemble performances; conducting apprenticeships 
with professional orchestras, operas, or ballet companies; composing for 
films, television, public schools, and for ensembles in residence; research in 
major national and international libraries; music criticism apprenticeships 
for campus and off-campus newspapers. Specialized studies are engaged by 
the individual student with the approval of the faculty. 
Twelve university academic distribution courses in humanities, social 
sciences, and natural sciences are required for the combination master's/ 
bachelor's music degree. Music courses may not be used to satisfy the humani- 
ties requirement. Selection is made jointly by the student and faculty adviser 
and may be taken consecutively or may be paired to allow for off-campus 
apprenticeships and research projects. Knowledge of at least one foreign 
language is strongly recommended. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the requirements for the Master of Music 
degree with an area major, the five-year student is also awarded the Bachelor 
of Music degree. 

Courses for Nonmajors. Nonmajors will find the following courses de- 
signed for the general student: Music 117, 118; 307, 308; 317, 318; 413; 327, 328: 
151. 152, 153; 154, 155, 156; 157, 158. In addition, other music courses may be 
taken by the nonmajor with the permission of the instructor and approval of the 
dean of the Shepherd School. 

Musical Opportunities. Musical and educational opportunities are 
afforded the student both on campus and in the greater Houston area. A visiting 
lecturer series, a professional concert series, and numerous visiting distin- 
guished musicians contribute to the Shepherd School environment. The 
Houston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Chorale, Houston Grand Opera, 
Texas Opera Theater, Houston Ballet, as well as the activities of other institu- 
tions of higher learning in the area, provide exceptional opportunities for 
musical experiences. 

Grades. The curriculum of the Shepherd School is a combination under- 
graduate honors and graduate curriculum. Any student who does not meet a 
correspondingly high level of achievement will be subject to warning and music 
probation and possibly to dismissal as a music major. 

Special Examinations: 

a. At the end of each semester an examination will be given in individual 
musicianship over the material studied during the semester. 

b. Keyboard proficiency is required of all degree candidates and may be 
satisfied by examination or by the election of sequential courses. 

c. Sight-reading proficiency examinations on the major instrument are re- 



224 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

quired at the end of the fourth semester. Students who do not pass this 
examination are required to take remedial work in sight-reading until the 
proficiency level is attained, 
d. Each student must take a qualifying examination during the fifth or sixth 
semester to determine admissibility to the student's preferred major area in 
the specialized curriculum. For performance majors this examination will 
consist of the junior recital and two three-hour examinations (one in music 
history and one in music theory) based on the compositions to be performed 
on the junior recital. The Graduate Record Examination will be adminis- 
tered to all music students at the conclusion of the fifth semester. 

Performance. Students are expected to perform frequently during their 
residence at Rice. Performance majors must present at least three full recitals, 
in the fifth or sixth semester, in the seventh or eight semester, and in the ninth 
or tenth semester. Frequent performance is expected of all students during the 
core curriculum. Composition majors are expected to present full recitals in the 
fourth and fifth years, and conducting majors, in the fifth and sixth years. 
Students are expected to attend both faculty and student recitals. 

Thesis and Comprehensive Graduate Examinations. The master'sde- 
gree for composition, conducting, music history, and theory majors assumes a 
high level of scholarship. A thesis is required of music history and theory 
majors. An original work of extended scope is required of composition majors. 
Conducting majors may present either an extended composition or a thesis. 

Comprehensive graduate examinations, both written and oral, are required 
of all majors in composition, conducting, music history, and theory. Comprehen- 
sive graduate examinations are not required of performance majors. Final 
recitals are considered the equivalent of comprehensive graduate examinations 
for performance majors. 

Large Ensembles. All students are required to participate in one of the 
school's large ensembles each semester during the five-year program. Fresh- 
men may be exempt from this requirement at the requestof their artist teacher 
and with the approval of the dean. 

Warning, Music School Probation, Discontinuation. A student perform- 
ing unsatisfactorily in one or more courses at the midterm period may be 
placed on warning. If at the end of the semester significant improvement has 
not been shown, the student may be placed on music probation. A student may 
be placed directly on probation without having been placed on warning. Pro- 
bation is a more serious status than warning, and it signifies that the student's 
work has been sufficiently unsatisfactory to preclude graduation unless 
significant improvement is achieved promptly. A student on music probation 
may be absent from class only for extraordinary reasons and may not represent 
the school in any public function not directly a part of a degree program. 

If at the conclusion of the probationary period the student has not shown 
marked improvement, the student may be discontinued from the school as a 
music major. Any student discontinued as a music major but not on academic 
suspension may elect a major elsewhere in the university, subject to the require- 
ments of the major department or school. 

The Shepherd School of Music opened its doors to its first freshman class in 
1975. This catalog describes courses offered in 1978-1979 and gives an overview 
of courses to be offered in subsequent years. For a copy of the complete curricu- 
lum and course offerings of the Shepherd School, address the Dean, The 
Shepherd School of Music, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77001. 



Mr. Milburn 


Mr. Milburn 


Staff 


Staff 


s, Mr. Milburn 


Mr. Gottschalk 


Mr. Milburn 



. ■ MUSIC 225 

Composition 

Music Courses 

201a. Composition I (3-0-3). 

Creative composition employing midcentury vocabularies supported by extensive perfor- 
mance, listening, and analysis, of related scores. Permission of instructor required. 

Mr. Cooper. Mr. Milburn. Mr. Gotti^chalk 

202b. Composition II (3-0-3). 

Creative composition employing current musical vocabularies supported by appropriate 
performance, listening, and analysis. Mr. Cooper. Mr. Milburn, Mr. Gottschalk 

301a. Composition III (3-0-3). 

Composition for solo instruments and small ensembles. 

302b. Composition IV (3-0-3). 

Composition for four-six instruments and/or voices. 

307a, 308b. Composition for Nonmajors (3-0-3 each semester). 
401a, 402b. Composition V, VI (3-0-3 each semester). 

501a, 502b. Advanced Composition I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Composition for large ensembles. Mr. Cooper, Mr. Jone. 

503a. Electronic Music Composition (1-6-3). 
504a. Music for Media (1-6-3). 

601a, 602b. Advanced Composition III, IV (3-0-3 each semester). 

Mr. Cooper, Mr. Jonef<, Mr. Milburn 

603a, 604b. Graduate Composition Seminar (Credit variable). 

Mr. Cooper, Mr. Milburn 



Theory 

Music Courses 

117a. Fundamentals of Music I (3-0-3). 

For non-music majors with minimal musical preparation. Rudiments of pitch and duration. 
Study of scales, chord structure tonality, and forms. Staff 

118b. Fundamentals of Music II (3-0-3). 

Application of Music 117 materials. Creative work utilizing twentieth-century art and 
popular vocabulary. Staff 

211a. Theoretical Studies I (3-0-3). 

Music aesthetics, physical properties of sound, melody, rhythm, counterpoint, instrumenta- 
tion, and form. Study of and creative work in music of the late Medieval period and the Renais- 
sance. For music majors. Prerequisite: theory evaluation survey. Mr. Cooper 

212b. Theoretical Studies II (3-0-3). 

Discussion, analysis, and creative application of theoretical concepts and vocabulary from 
1700 to 1950. For music majors. Prerequisite: theory evaluation survey. Mr. Cooper 

311a. Theoretical Studies III (3-0-3). 

Baroque and Early Classical music. Species counterpoint and two-three-four voice tonal 
counterpoint. Analysis of representative compositions of diverse genre and media. For music 
majors. Mr. Milburn 

312b. Theoretical Studies IV (3-0-3). 

Late Classical and Romantic music. Continued study of tonal counterpoint. Instrumentation. 
Analysis of selected major works. For music majors. Mr. Gottschalk 

317a. Theory for Nonmajors I (3-0-3). 

For non-music majors with appreciable instrumental and/or theory background. Discussion, 
analysis, and application of melody, rhythm, harmony, counterpoint, instrumentation, and form. 
Application to literature to 1700. Ms. Citron 



226 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

318b. Theory for Nonmajors II (3-0-3). 

Stylistic harmony, melody, and form from 1700 to the present. Ms. Citron 

411a. Theoretical Studies V (3-0-3). 

Music of the twentieth century. Counterpoint and orchestration, employing twentieth- 
century vocabulary and techniques. Analysis of selected major works. Mr. Gottschalk 

412b. Theoretical Studies VI (3-0-3). 

Advanced analytical techniques. Practical applications of principal and analytical systems 
from the Middle Ages to the present. Mr. Milhurn 

414b. Acoustics of Music (3-0-3). Mr. Gottschalk 

511a, 512b. Graduate Theory Review I, II (3-0-2 each semester). Mr. Cooper 

513a. Model Counterpoint I (2-0-2). 

Imitative composition in two to eight voices. Analysis of selected works from the fifteenth 
and sixteenth centuries. Mr. Milburn 

515a, 516b. Advanced Orchestration I, II (2-0-1 each semester). 

Mr. Cooper. Mr. Gottftcfialk 

611a, 612b. Pedagogy of Theory I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Principal learning theories and philosophies of learning and teaching. Examination and 
critique of college-level materials. Supervised teaching experience and apprenticeship. 

Mr. Cooper 

613b. Canon and Fugue (2-0-2). 

Specialized study of imitative counterpoint. Examples from the fifteenth to twentieth 
centuries. Emphasis on the Baroque fugue. Mr. Milburn 

715, 716. History of Theory I, II (3-0-3 each semester).t 

History and Literature 

Music Courses 

221a, 222b. Historical Studies I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Historical study of musical style. The Middle Ages to 1700, first semester; 1700 to the 
present, second semester. Ms. Hanson 

321a, 322b. Historical Studies III, IV (3-0-3 each semester). 

Advanced historical studies in music of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth cen- 
turies. Baroque and Early Classical, first semester; Classical and Romantic, second semester. 
Correlated with Music 311. 312, and 331, 332. M.s. Schnoebelen. Ms. Hanson 

327a, 328b. Music Literature for Nonmajors I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 
Historical survey of music from the Middle Ages to the present. Mr. Kurtzman 

421a. Historical Studies V (3-0-3). 

Twentieth century and contemporary. Advanced historical studies in music of the twentieth 
century. Correlated with Music 411 and 431. Mr. Kurtzman 

422. Renaissance Music (3-0-3).t 

423b. Chamber Music Literature (3-0-3). 

Survey of chamber music literature from the early Baroque to the present. Ms. Schnoebelen 

424a, 425b. Organ Literature I, II (3-0-3 each semester). Mr. Holloway 

426. Piano Literature (3-0-3).t 

427. Song Literature (3-0-3).t 

428a. Symphonic Literature (3-0-3). 

Historical development of the symphony and its literature from ca. 1740 to the present. 

M.S'. Hanson 

429b. Music of the Middle Ages (3-0-3). Mr. Kurtzman 

521a, 522b. Graduate History Review I, II (3-0-2 each semester). 



MUSIC 227 

523a. Bibliography and Research Methods, I (3-0-3). 

Techniques in research methodology, studies in bibliography. Staff 

524. Bibliography and Research Methods II (3-0-3).t 

525a. Performance Practice Seminar (3-0-3). 

Advanced studies in performance practice; study of treatises, editing, analyses of 
performance. Ms. Schnoebelen 

528b. History of Musical Instruments (3-0-3). 

An historical survey of the various families of musical instruments and their development 
to the present. Staff 

529. History of Opera (3-0-3).t 

621. Pedagogy of Music History (3-0-3).t 

624b. Beethoven (3-0-3). 

Advanced study of Beethoven's music, sketchbooks, contemporaries, and historical setting. 

Ms. Scluioehelen 

721. Selected Studies in Music History (3-0-3).t 

723. Aesthetics in Music (3-0-3).t - • 

724. Collegium Practicum (l-3-l).t 

725. 726. History of Notation I, II (3-0-3 each semester).! 

Applied Studies, Ensembles, Conducting 

MuKic Cour.tes 

231a. Applied Studies I (2-3-3). 

Solfege, rhythmic studies, intonation, listening. Mr. Tipton. Ms. Citron 

232b. Applied Studies II (0-10-3). 

Continuation of Music 231 plus string, wind, percussion, and vocal ensembles. 

Mr. Tipton, M.s-. Citron 

331a, 332b. Applied Studies III, IV (0-14-3 each semester). 

Studies in solfege, rhythmic studies, intonation: phrasing, style, performance practice. 
Chamber ensembles, large ensemble (orchestra or chorus). Baroque (first semester) and 
Classical/Romantic (second semester). Mr. Tipton, Ms. Citron 

335a,b. Chorus (0-3-1). Mr. Koehler 

337a,b. Undergraduate Orchestra (0-9-1). ' ' • '^' '^ Mr. Jones 

338a,b. Undergraduate Chamber Music (3-3-1). Staff 

431a. Applied Studies V (6-0-1). 

Sight reading, phrasing, style, performance practice. Contemporary chamber ensembles, 
large ensemble (orchestra or chorus). Mr. Tipton. Ms. Citron 

433a. Score Reading (2-2-2). 

434b. Elements of Conducting (2-9-2). 

531a,b. Orchestral Repertoire (1-3-1). 

May be repeated. 

537a, 538b. Advanced Conducting I, II (3-9-3 each semester). 

539a. Psychology of Conducting (1-0-1). 

635a,b. Advanced Orchestra (7-5-2). 

636a,b. Advanced Chamber Music (2-5-2). 

637a, 638b. Advanced Conducting III, IV (3-9-3 each semester). 

639b. Orchestra Administration (1-0-1). 



Mr. Jones 


Mr. Jones 




--.,_ 


Mr. Jones 


Mr. 


Jones 


Mr. 


Jones 




Staff 


Mr. 


Jones 


Mr. Jones 



228 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Nonmajor Individual Instruction 

Music Courses 

151a, 152b; 153a, 154b; 155a, 156b; 157a, 158b. Individual Musicianship 
for Nonmajors (1-5-1 each semester). 
College-level study in any instrument or voice. Instructor assigned by the dean. Fee required. 

Woodwind Instruction 

Music Courses 

251a. 252b - 651a, 652b. Flute 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Five-year sequence. Mr. Tipton 

253a, 254b - 653a, 654b. Oboe 1,2 -9, 10 (1-25-3 each semester). Mr. Rosenberg 

255a, 256b - 655a, 656b. Clarinet 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). Mr. Pickar 

257a, 258b - 657a, 658b. Bassoon 1,2 -9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). Mr. Arbiter 

159a,b; 259a,b; 359a,b. Secondary Woodwind Instruction I, II, III (Credit 

variable). 
459a. Theory of Woodwind Performance Technique (1-3-1). Mr. Rosenberg 
559a,b. Woodwind Pedagogy (1-3-2). Staff 



Brass Instruction 

Music Courses 

261a, 262b - 661a, 662b. Horn 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 
Five-year sequence. 

263a, 264b - 663a, 664b. Trumpet 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Mr. Guderian 

265a, 266b - 665a, 666b. Trombone 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Mr. Waters 

267a, 268b - 667a, 668b. Tuba 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). Mr. Deck 

169a,b; 269a,b; 369a,b. Secondary Brass Instruction I, II, III (Credit 
variable). Staff 

469a,b. Theory of Brass Performance Techniques (1-3-1). Mr. Bacon 

569a,b. Brass Pedagogy (1-3-2). Staff 



Percussion Instruction 

Music Courses 

271a, 272b - 671a, 672b. Percussion 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Five-year sequence. Mr. Brown 

479a,b. Theory of Percussion Performance Techniques (1-3-1). Mr. Broum 

579a,b. Percussion Pedagogy (1-3-2). Mr. Brown 



MUSIC 229 

Voice Instruction 

Music Courses 

273a, 274b - 673a, 674b. Voice 1,2 - 9,10 (1-20-3 each semester). 

Five-year sequence. Ms. Bible 

179a,b; 279a,b; 379a,b. Secondary Voice Instruction I, II, III (Credit 
variable). , Staff 

549a,b. Voice Pedagogy (1-3-2). Staff 

575a, 576b; 675a, 676b. Voice Repertoire I, II, III, IV (1-3-1 each semester). 

577a, 578b; 677a, 678b. Diction I, II, III, IV (1-3-1 each semester). Staff 

Keyboard and Harp Instruction 

Music Courses 

281a, 282b - 681a, 682b. Piano 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Five-year sequence. Ms. Norris 

283a, 284b - 683a, 684b. Organ 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). Mr. Holloway 

285a, 286b - 685a, 686b. Harpsichord 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Mr. Holloway 

287a, 288b - 687a, 688b. Harp 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). Ms. Rose 

189a,b. Secondary Piano I (1-5-1 each semester). 

May be taken two times. Required of all majors if piano proficiency not passed. Ms. Ettelson 

289a,b. Secondary Piano II (1-5-1 each semester). 

May be taken three times. Required of all majors if piano proficiency not passed. Ms. Ettelson 

389a,b. Secondary Piano III (Credit variable). Staff 

445a, 446b; 545a, 546b. Keyboard Proficiency I, II, III, IV (Credit variable). 

Mr. Holloway 

489a,b. Secondary Piano IV (Credit variable). Staff 

589a,b. Keyboard Pedagogy (1-3-2). Staff 

645a,b. Organ Construction (Credit variable). Staff 

String Instruction 

Music Courses 

291a, 292b - 691a, 692b. Violin 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Five-year sequence. Ms. Shapiro, Mr. Fliegel, Mr. Patterson 

293a, 294b - 693a, 694b. Viola 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). Mr. Croupe 

295a, 296b - 695a, 696b. Violoncello 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Ms. Trepel 

297a, 298b - 697a, 698b. Double Bass 1,2 - 9,10 (1-25-3 each semester). 

Mr. Ellison 

199a,b. Secondary String Instruction I (Credit variable). 

Violin, viola, cello, or bass. Staff 

299a,b. Secondary String Instruction II (Credit variable). 

Continuation of Music 199. Prerequisite: Three semesters of Music 199 or five semesters of 
major string instruction. Staff 



230 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

399a,b. Secondary String Instruction III (Credit variable). 

Continuation of Music 299. Prerequisite: Three semesters of Music 299 or five semesters of 
major string instruction. Staff 

499. Theory of String Performance Techniques (l-3-l).t 
Primarily for conductors and composers. 

599a,b. String Pedagogy (1-3-2). Staff 

Courses Applicable to All Specializations 

Music Courses 

449a,b. Undergraduate Independent Study (Credit variable). Staff 

547. Pre-Thesis in Composition, Theory, or History and Literature, or 
Conducting (Credit variable). staff 

647a,b. Master's Thesis in Composition, Theory, History and Literature, or 
Conducting (1-0-3 each semester). 

649a,b. Graduate Independent Study in Theory or History and Literature 

(Credit variable). Staff 

741a,b. Recital in Conducting, Major Instrument, or Voice (Credit 
variable). Staff 

749a,b. Apprenticeship in Composition, Theory, Music History, Con- 
ducting, or Mainr Instrument (Credit variable). Staff 

Naval Science 



Professor A. E. Nelson, Chairman 

Associate Professor B. B. Williams 

Assistant Professors C. L. Brown and A. A. Desantis 

The Department of Naval Science is administered by a senior U.S. naval 
officer, assisted by officers and men of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The 
purpose of the Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps is to train highly select 
young men and women for naval service as commissioned officers of the Navy 
and Marine Corps. 

Students taking five-year courses are considered eligible for enrollment at 
the beginning of their first or second year. In view of the heavy academic loads 
for fifth-year engineering students and scheduling difficulties, all students are 
encouraged to enroll in the regular manner during freshman matriculation. 
Students may voluntarily disenroll any time during the first two years of the 
program, without incurring further service obligation. 

There are two categories of NROTC students: (1) scholarship; (2) non- 
scholarship. 

Scholarship Students. A scholarship NROTC student is appointed a 
midshipman, U.S. Naval Reserve, on a nationwide competitive basis and re- 
ceives retainer pay at the rate of $100 per month for a maximum of four 
academic years, with all tuition, fees, books, and equipment paid for by the 
government. He is required to complete prescribed naval science courses, 
participate in drills and three summer cruises, and, upon graduation with a 
baccalaureate or advanced degree, to accept a regular commission as ensign in 
the U.S. Navy or second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. 



NAVAL SCIENCE 231 

Nonscholarship Students. Nonscholarship students are civilian college 
students who enter into a mutual contract with the Secretary of the Navy in 
which they take naval science courses and participate in drills and one summer 
training cruise. In return, the Navy pays the student $100 per month during 
the junior and senior years, and offers a reserve commission in the Navy or 
Marine Corps upon graduation. Nonscholarship students may, on a local, 
competitive basis, be recommended for scholarship status by the professor of 
naval science. 

Two- Year Program Students. Interested students may, in their sopho- 
more year (junior year for five-year students at Rice), apply for the two-year 
NROTC Program. A nationwide competition will initially determine their 
scholarship or nonscholarship status (see above). Following selection, appli- 
cants attend a six-week Naval Science Institute (NSI) at Newport, Rhode 
Island, during July and August, which is designed to "make up" the first two 
years of the regular NROTC program. Successful completion of NSI qualifies 
the student for enrollment in the advanced NROTC on an equal footing with 
the four-year students. About 15% of the nonscholarship students finishing 
NSI may be offered a full NROTC scholarship at that time. Additional scholar- 
ships may be awarded to the others from time to time upon the recommenda- 
tion of the professor of naval science at Rice. 

U.S. Marine Corps. NROTC students, either scholarship or nonscholar- 
ship, may apply for the Marine Corps program. Such selectees are referred to 
as Marine Corps option students and attend separate classes under a Marine 
officer instructor during their junior and senior years. 



Naval Science 

101a. Naval Orientation (2-2-2). 

An introduction to naval traditions and customs, seamanship, naval organization and 
missions, and the fundamental concepts of seapower. Staff 

102b. Naval Ships Systems I — Naval Engineering (3-2-3). 

A study of ship design, stability, compartmentation. propulsion, auxiliary power, refrigera- 
tion, electrical systems, and damage and casualty control measures. Mr. Broum 

201a. Naval Ships Systems II — Naval Weapons (3-2-3). 

An introduction to naval weapons systems with emphasis on linear analysis of ballistics and 
control system dynamics. Mr. Brown 

202b. Sea Power and Maritime Affairs (3-2-3). 

Readings, discussions, and research on selected topics related to the history, importance, 
and impact of sea power on modern civilization. Mr. Nelson 

301a. Navigation (3-2-4). 

A comprehensive study of coastal piloting, celestial and electronic ship navigation; involves 
nautical astronomy, navigational aids, satellite and inertial systems. Staff 

302b. Naval Operations (3-2-4). 

An analysis of ship movements, formations, and fleet operations; includes Rules of the Road, 
maneuvering board, tactical publications and communications. Staff 

401a,b; 402a,b. Principles of Leadership and Management (3-2-3 each 

semester). 

An introduction to the principles and concepts of management organization, leadership, 
military law and discipline, information systems, and decision making. 

Mr. Williams, Mr. Desantis 

NROTC students who desire to be commissioned as second lieutenants in 
the U.S. Marine Corps or Marine Corps Reserve, and whose applications for 
transfer are accepted, will substitute the following courses during the final two 
years. 



232 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Naval Science Courses 

303Ma. Evolution of Warfare (3-2-3). 

Historical survey of the evolution of the conduct of warfare. Strategy, tactics, weapons, 
organization, and military leaders/thinkers are studied. Mr. Desantis 

403Ma. Amphibious Warfare (3-2-3). 

Study of the history of amphibious warfare. Case studies examine doctrine, tactics, and the 
factors necessary for successful operations. Mr. Deftantis 

In addition to the courses listed above, NROTC students may be required 
to complete certain other courses that are offered by the university. 



Philosophy 



Professor Brody, Chairman 

Professor Kolenda; Associate Professor Giannoni 

Assistant Professors Kulstad, Loevinsohn, Modrak, and Rawlinson 

Instructor Bencivenga 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Major. The philosophy major requires thirty semester 
hours (ten courses); at least eighteen semester hours (six courses) must be at the 
300-level or above. Majors must take Philosophy 201, 202, 306, one course in 
logic (either 106 or 305), and two further courses in the history of philosophy 
(301, 302, 308, 501, or 502). If the student wishes, metaphysics (Philosophy 304) 
or epistemology (Philosophy 303) may be substituted for one of these additional 
history courses. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree: 

1. Completion with high standing of at least twenty-four semester hours in 
advanced courses approved by the department 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign language 

3. Completion of a written thesis on a subject approved by the department 

4. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination not limited to the 
student's special field of study 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1. Satisfactory performance during the early part of the second semester on a 
preliminary examination based on specific reading chosen from among 
major philosophical works 

2. Completion with high standing of courses approved by the department and 
of work in the area of logic 

3. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign language; 
students whose research interests require a substantial knowledge of another 
discipline can petition to substitute for the language exam an examination 
in that other discipline 

4. Satisfactory performance on examinations in history of philosophy, meta- 
physics and epistemology, value theory, and philosophy of science and 
language 



PHILOSOPHY 233 

5. Completion of a written thesis on a subject approved by the department; at 
least one year of thesis research must be spent in residence 

6. Satisfactory performance in limited teaching duties assigned by the de- 
partment 

7. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination, not limited to the 
student's special field of study ^ 

Philosophy Courses 

101a. Philosophical Perspectives on Contemporary Moral and Legal 

Issues (3-0-3). 

An examination of the moral and legal issues surrounding such topics as abortion, euthen- 
asia, war, capital punishment, and equality of opportunity. Mr. Brody 

102b. Four Perspectives on the Meaning of Life: Existentialism, Marxism, 
Mysticism, Humanism (3-0-3). 

An examination of contrasting orientations toward human life which emerged from the 
contemporary intellectual, social, and political situation. Mr. Kolenda 

103a. Philosophy and Psychology: The Critical Interaction (3-0-3). 

An examination of the interrelationship between philosophical and psychological thought. 

M.S. Rawlinson 

104b. Philosophical Perspectives on Science (3-0-3). 

Philosophical issues that arise in and about science; specific theories in both natural and 
social science, analyzed to understand the nature and impact of scientific knowledge. 

Mr. Giannoni 

106b. Logic (3-0-3). 

A system of natural deduction will be used to establish the validity of arguments whose 
validity turns on their truth functional or quantificational form. Mr. Bencivenga 

201a. History of Philosophy I (3-0-3). 

A survey of major philosophers of the ancient and medieval world, from Thales to Ockham. 

Ms. Modrak 

202b. History of Philosophy II (3-0-3). 

A survey of modern philosophy beginning with Descartes and including logical positivism, 
philosophical analysis, and existentialism. Mr. Kulstad 

203a,b. Problems of Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality (3-0-3). 

Survey of traditional and contemporary authors on presuppositions of knowledge; relation of 
language to reality; nature of knowledge and truth; conflict between determinism and freedom. 

Staff 

301a. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3-0-3). 

A survey of major philosophical writings from the fourth century through the fourteenth. 

Ms. Modrak 

302b. Modern Philosophy (3-0-3). 

The topic for this year is Continental Rationalism: Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, Pre- 
requisite: one course in philosophy. Mr. Kulstad 

303a. Epistemology (3-0-3). 

Topics: knowledge, truth, perception, memory, etc. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. 

Mr. Kulstad 

304. Metaphysics (3-0-3).t 

An examination of some classical and contemporary metaphysical systems. Particular 
attention to the very possibility of metaphysical analysis. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. 

Mr. Brody 

305a. Mathematical Logic (3-0-3). 

Natural deduction, axiomatic, and semantical treatment of first order logic. Also, Godel's 
Incompleteness Theorem for arithmetic. Mr. Giannoni 

306b. Ethics (3-0-3). 

A philosophical analysis of traditional and contemporary theories of ethics. Mr. Loeviruiohn 



234 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

307a. Social and Political Philosophy (3-0-3). 

What makes a society just? On what grounds may the liberty of individuals be legitimately 
limited? What social ends may a state legitimately pursue? Mr. Loevinaohn 

308a. Continental Philosophy From Kant to Heidegger (3-0-3). 

Ms. Rawlinson 

309b. Aesthetics (3-0-3). 

Contemporary critiques of traditional theories of art. Examples from film, paintings, and a 
variety of recent movements in the arts. Ms. Rawlinson 

311a. Philosophy of Religion (3-0-3).t 

An examination of God's existence, the problem of evil, the relation between faith and reason, 
and the varieties of religious experience. 

312b. Philosophy of Mind (3-0-3). 

An inquiry into the nature of mind with emphasis on the mind/body problem. Prerequisite: 
one course in philosophy. Ms. Modrak 

313a. Philosophy of Science (3-0-3). 

A study of the relationship between scientific theories, experiment, observation, and reality. 
Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Mr. Giannoni 

314. Biomedical Ethics (3-0-3).t 

An examination of such questions as abortion and euthenasia, the allocation of scarce 
medical resources, and experimentation upon human beings. 

316b. Philosophy of Law (3-0-3). 

Examination of social control of private property, compensation in the law of torts, the right 
to privacy and bodily integrity, and justice through compensatory discrimination, etc. Mr. Brody 

318a. Philosophy in Literature (3-0-3). 

Study of philosophical themes in selected works in English. French, German, and Russian 
literature. Mr. Kolenda 

320. Space and Time (3-0-3).t 

The impact of recent theories on our views of the nature and structure of space and time. 

322b. American Philosophy (3-0-3). Mr. Kolenda 

401a, 402b. Independent Reading I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

By permission of the department. Staff 

403. Philosophy of Language (3-0-3).t 

A philosophical investigation of relations among language, thought, and reality. Theories of 
reference will be emphasized. Prerequisite: two courses in linguistics or philosophy. Also offered 
as Linguistics 466. 

404. Action Theory (3-0-3).t 

The philosophical problems embedded in our conception of human action — topics include 
the problem of individuation of actions and the relation between actions and reasons. 

405b. Senior Seminar (3-0-3). Mr. Loevinsohn 

407a. Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (3-0-3). Mr. Bencivenga 

501. Seminar in Modern Philosophy (3-0-3).t 

May be repeated for credit. 

502b. Seminar in Ancient Philosophy (3-0-3). 

May be repeated for credit. Ms. Modrak 

503a. Seminar in Epistemology (3-0-3). Mr. Kulstad 

505b. Seminar in Metaphysics (3-0-3). Mr. Brody 

506b. Seminar in Philosophy of Physics (3-0-3). Mr. Giannoni 

507a. Seminar in Ethics (3-0-3). Mr. Loevinsohn 
508. Seminar in Social and Political Philosophy (3-0-3).t 



PHILOSOPHY 235 

509. Seminar in Philosophy of Science (3-0-3).t 

510a. Seminar in Philosophy of Language (3-0-3). Mr. Bencivenga 

512. Seminar in Philosophy of Mind (3-0-3).t 

513a. Pragmatism (3-0-3). Mr. Kolenda 

514. Husserl (3-0-3).t A ^ 

515. Wittgenstein and Austin (3-0-3).t 

516. Frege to Logical Positivism (3-0-3).t 

518b. Recent Continental Thought (3-0-3). M.s. Raivlimon 

601a, 602b. Advanced Independent Reading I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Staff 

701a, 702b. Research and Thesis (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 



Physics 



Professor N. F. Lane, Chairman 

Professors S. D. Baker, Class, Clayton, Donoho, Duck, Estle, Michel, 

Phillips, Risser, Rorschach, Stebbings, Trammell, 

Valkovic, Walters, and Wolf 

Visiting Professor Lovesey 

Adjunct Professor Hazlewood 

Associate Professors Dunning, Hannon, Huang, and Mutchler 

Adjunct Associate Professor Rundel 

Assistant Professors J. B. Roberts and Dodds 

Visiting Assistant Professor Miettinen 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Chang 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. During the first two years, all physics majors, 
including those electing one of the five physics options listed below, are required 
to take the following courses: 

Mathematics 101, 102 (or equivalent honors courses) and 211, 212 

Physics 101, 102, 132; and 201, 202, 231 

Chemistry 101, 102, 107 

Each student will be assigned a faculty adviser at the end of the sophomore 
year who will be responsible for course registration for the junior and senior 
years. Unless students elect one of the special options given below, seven physics 
lecture courses and four physics laboratory courses at or above the 300 level 
are required during the junior and senior years. These are: 

Physics 301, 302 and 311. 312 

Physics 331, 332 (Advanced Laboratory) 

Physics 411. 412, and 425 

Physics 431, 432 or 433, 434 (Senior Research) 

Students will select courses in mathematics or mathematical sciences in 
consultation with their advisers so that they will complete three semesters 
beyond the two-year introductory sequence. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, all students, 
including those who select one of the options below, must satisfy the distribution 



236 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

requirements (see page 50) and complete at least 60 semester hours outside the 
departmental requirements. Regular physics majors must complete a total 
program of at least 138 semester hours. 

Physics majors with a special interest in astrophysics, biophysics, geo- 
physics, or nuclear energy may wish to elect one of the special options described 
below. 

Option in Space Physics and Astronomy. During the first two years, the 
requirements coincide with those for a standard physics major (described 
above). In addition, Space Physics and Astronomy 251, 252, 261, and 262 should 
ordinarily be elected in the sophomore year. The following upper level courses 
are required: 

Physics 301, 302 and 311, 312 

Physics 331, 332 (Advanced Laboratory) 

Physics 425 

Space Physics and Astronomy 471, or 472 

Space Physics and Astronomy 431, 432 (Senior Research) 

Upper level mathematics or mathematical sciences (two semesters) 

Students selecting this option must complete a total program of at least 140 
semester hours. A faculty adviser who is jointly appointed by the Physics and 
the Space Physics and Astronomy Departments will be assigned to each 
student. 

Option in Biophysics. During the first two years, the student should satisfy 
the physics, chemistry, and mathematics requirements listed above for a 
standard physics major. The following additional courses are also required for 
graduation: 

Chemistry 211. 212, 213, 214 (should be taken second year) 

Biology 101, 102. 103, 104 

Biochemistry 361 

Physics 301, 302 and 311, 312 

Students selecting the biophysics option must complete a total program of 
at least 134 semester hours. 

Option in Geophysics. During the first two years, the student should 
satisfy the physics, chemistry, and mathematics requirements listed for a stan- 
dard physics major. The following additional courses are also required for 
graduation: 

Geology 101, 102; 111, 112; and 461, 462 

Electrical Engineering 220 

Physics301, 302, and311 

Mathematical Sciences 340 (or equivalent) 

Physics 431, 432 or Physics 433, 434 (Senior Research) 

Upper level mathematics or mathematical sciences (three semester hours) 

Students selecting the geophysics option must complete a total program of 
at least 139 semester hours. 

Option in Nuclear Energy. During the first two years, the student should 
satisfy the physics, chemistry, and mathematics requirements listed above for a 
standard physics major. The following additional courses are also required for 
graduation: 

Engineering 200 

Physics 301, 302; 311, 312; 331, 332; and 411 

Materials Science 395 

Mechanical Engineering 481 

Chemical Engineering 631, 632 

Physics 431, 432 or 433, 434 (Senior Research) 

Students selecting the nuclear energy option must complete a total pro- 



PHYSICS 237 

gram of at least 139 semester hours. 

Chemical Physics Major. An interdepartmental major in chemical 
physics is offered in conjunction with the Department of Chemistry. Students 
wishing to elect this major must be approved by both departments, and should 
consult the department chairmen for further details. 

Graduate Program. The Department of Physics offers studies and 
research programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy. The Physics Department offers research facilities and thesis 
supervision in the fields of astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics and 
quantum electronics, biophysics, nuclear physics, solid state and low tempera- 
ture physics, and theoretical physics. 

To be eligible for the Master of Arts degree, a graduate student must com- 
plete thirty semester hours of approved graduate level studies, including a 
research thesis performed under the direction of a physics faculty member. A 
minimum of one year of graduate study is required for the M.A. 

To be eligible for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a graduate student must 
first demonstrate to the department the ability to engage in advanced research. 
This is normally done by successfully completing the work for the Master of 
Arts in physics, or by equivalent research publication. The student must also 
complete in residence sixty semester hours of approved graduate level study, 
including fifteen semester hours in required courses and a research thesis 
completed under the direction of a physics faculty member. A minimum of two 
years of graduate study is required for the Ph.D. Further details of research 
programs in physics and departmental degree requirements are contained in a 
pamphlet "Graduate Study in Physics and Space Physics and Astronomy" 
available from the Physics Department on request. 

Physics Courses 

101a. Mechanics (3-0-3). 

The first semester of the sequence in physics for science and engineering students. 

Mr. Baker, Mr. Ror.'<chach 
102b. Electricity and Magnetism (3-0-3). 

The second semester of the sequence in physics for science and engineering students. 

Mr. Baker, Mr. Rors^chach 
Ilia. Mechanics (3-0-3). 

A self-paced version of Physics 101. Limited enrollment. Mr. Risser 

112b. Electricity and Magnetism (3-0-3). 

A self-paced version of Physics 102. Limited enrollment. Mr. Risser 

121a. Technical Physics I (3-0-3). 

A noncalculus survey of mechanics, sound and optics, primarily intended for architecture 
and premedical students, with emphasis on problem-solving. Mr. Estle 

122b. Technical Physics II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Physics 121. Electricity and magnetism, physical optics, heat and thermo- 
dynamics. Mr. Estle 

123a, 124b. Introductory Physics Laboratory (0-3-1 each semester). 

Recommended for all students enrolled in Physics 121, 122 and 141, 142. Mr. Risser 

132b. Elementary Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Recommended for students enrolled in Physics 102 or 112. Mr. Class, Mr. Walters 

141a, 142b. Concepts in Physics I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Emphasis on the nature of physical phenomena, the conceptual development of physics, and 
related cultural influences. The laboratory Physics 123, 124 is recommended. Mr Clayton 

201a. Electromagnetic Waves and Heat (3-0-3). 

The third semester of the four-semester sequence in physics for science and engineering 
students. Mr. Dunning, Mr. Mutchler 



238 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

202b. Modern Physics (3-0-3). 

The final semester of the four-semester sequence in physics for science and engineering 
students. Mr. Dunning, Mr. Mutchler 

211a. Electromagnetic Waves and Heat (3-0-3). 

A self-paced version of Physics 201. Limited enrollment. Mr. Haymes. Mr. Trammell 

212b. Modern Physics (3-0-3). 

A self-paced version of Physics 202. Limited enrollment. Mr. Hayme.^, Mr. Trammell 

231a. Elementary Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Recommended for students enrolled in Physics 201 or 211. Mr. C/a.s.s, Mr. Walters 

301a, 302b. Introduction to Mathematical Physics I, II (4-0-4 each semester). 

Classical mechanics, electrodynamics, and appropriate mathematical methods. Emphasis 

on problem-solving. Mr. Anderson. Mr. Baker, Mr. Huang. Mr. Miettinen, Mr. Roberts 

311a, 312b. Introduction to Quantum Physics I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Wave mechanics is developed and applied to the harmonic oscillator, free particle, and 
atomic structure. Mr. Stebbings 

331a, 332b. Junior Physics Laboratory (1-3-2 each semester). 

Mr. Mutchler, Mr. Rorschach 

411a, 412b. Principles of Modern Physics I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Continuation of quantum mechanics and modern physics begun in Physics 311, 312. Topics 
covered include molecular, solid state, nuclear, and elementary particle physics. Mr. Class 

425a. Statistical and Thermal Physics I (3-0-3). Mr. Dodds 

426b. Frontiers in Physics (3-0-3). 

Content varies from year to year. Examines topic or topics of current research interest in 
physics or related fields. Mr. Trammell 

431a, 432b. Senior Physics Research (0-6-2 each semester). Mr. Phillips, Staff 

433a, 434b. Honors Research (0-12-3 each semester). 

The student pursues a research project in a similar way to Physics 431, 432 but in con- 
siderably greater depth. Departmental approval required. Mr. Phillips, Staff 

451, 452. Special Topics in Physics: Methods of Experimental Physics 

(3-0-3 each semester).t 

461a, 462b. Independent Study in Physics (Credit variable). 

A reading course in special topics. Staff 

482b. Introduction to Biophysics (3-0-3). 

Senior/graduate-level course in the application of physics to biological problems involving 
structure, statistical mechanics, transport processes and electrophysiology. Mr. Chang, Staff 

495a, 496b. Physics Teaching (Credit variable). 

A combination of in-service teaching and a weekly seminar. Departmental approval 
required. Mr. Class 

515a. Advanced Classical Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, normal vibrations, rigid body motion, and the 
transformation theory of dynam.ics.Also offered as Space Physics and Astronomy 515.Mr. Lane 

521a, 522b. Principles of Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3 each semester). 

Also offered as Space Physics and Astronomy 521, 522. Mr. Huang 

526b. Statistical and Thermal Physics II (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Physics 425 intended primarily for first-year graduate students and 
qualified undergraduates. Mr. Dodds 

531a, 532b. Electromagnetic Theory (3-0-3 each semester). Mr. Duck 

541a, 542b. Nuclear Structure and Particle Physics I, II (3-0-3 each 

semester). Mr. Phillip.'^. Mr. Roberts, Mr. Miettinen 

543. Neutron and Reactor Physics (3-0-3).t 



PHYSICS 239 

544. Applied Nuclear Physics (3-0-3).t 

563a. Introduction to the Solid State (3-0-3). "** 

Fundamental concepts about crystalline solids and basic preparation for further courses in 
the sequence Physics 564-567. Also offered as Electrical Engineering and Materials Science 563. 

Mr. Brotzen 

564b. Electron Transport and Superconductivity (3-0-3). Mr. Dodds 

565. Dielectric and Optical Properties of Solids (3-0-3).t 

A survey of the optical and dielectric properties of solids. Interband transitions, excitons, 
lattice vibrations, and nonlinear optical properties. 

566. Imperfections and Mechanical Properties of Crystalline Solids (3-0-3).t 
The effect of lattice imperfections, such as point defects, dislocations, phonons, electrons, 

etc., upon the physical and mechanical properties of crystals. Also offered as Electrical Engi- 
neering and Materials Science 566. 

567b. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance (3-0-3). Mr. Estle 

571a. Atomic and Molecular Spectra and Structure (3-0-3). Mr. Walters 

572b. Theory of Electronic and Atomic Collisions (3-0-3). Mr. Lane 

573. Quantum Optics (3-0-3).t 

Laser physics and the use of lasers in physical research. 

574. Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structure (3-0-3).t 

575. Experimental Atomic Physics (3-0-3).t 

591a, 592b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). Staff 

595a, 596b. Physics Teaching. Staff 

621a. Advanced Quantum Mechanics I (3-0-3). Mr. Duck 

622. Advanced Quantum Mechanics II (3-0-3).t 

641, 642. Advanced Experimental Nuclear Physics (3-0-3 each semester).! 

643, 644. Theoretical Nuclear Physics (3-0-3 each semester). t 

645, 646. Special Topics in Nuclear Physics (3-0-3 each semester).! 

660. Gravitation and Relativity (3-0-3).t 

661a. Special Topics in Solid State Physics (3-0-3 each semester). Mr. Lovesey 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 

Political Science 

Professor von der Mehden, Chairmayi 

Professors Ambler, J. Cooper, Cuthbertson, Dix, and Doran 

Assistant Professors Gow and Sanders 

Instructor Harris 

Lecturer Hudspeth 

Visiting Lecturer D. Brady 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Majors in Political Science. Students majoring in political science are 
required to complete thirty semester hours (ten courses) in the field. All majors 
must also complete six semester hours (two courses) of advanced work, selected 
with the advice of the department in any of the following fields: anthropology. 



240 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

behavioral science, economics, history, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. 

Double majors in one of the above fields may automatically substitute six 
semester hours (two courses) in upper level courses in their second field for six of 
the required thirty semester hours in political science courses. Double majors 
whose second major is legal studies or managerial studies may automatically 
substitute three hours (one course). Double majors whose second field is not 
listed above normally will be required to take thirty semester hours (ten 
courses) in political science. They may petition for substitution of courses in 
other fields, but such substitutions will be permitted only when the course to be 
substituted has a close and significant relationship to political science. 

Within the major each student is encouraged to take a program of courses 
that provides both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowl- 
edge of some portion of it. Specific distribution requirements are minimal. 
However, students are required to take at least one course in any four of the six 
areas listed below: 

(1) American politics (4) International relations 

(2) Comparative government (5) Normative political theory 

(3) Law (6) Empirical theory and methodology 

Political Science 209, 210, 210H, 211, and 212 constitute the introductory 
courses in normative theory, American politics, international relations, and 
comparative government, respectively. Prospective majors are encouraged to 
take one or more of these courses, preferably in their freshman or sophomore 
years. However, none are required of majors, except that Political Science 209 
and 210 (or 210H) together remain the courses that meet the Texas state 
licensing requirements in political science for teachers. It should also be noted 
that no more than three of the above introductory courses may be counted 
toward the major. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Honors Program. Political science majors who qualify may enter an hon- 
ors program. The program will consist of (1) a one-semester reading course in 
the junior year (taken either term) which will serve as the basis for drawing up a 
prospectus for the senior essay, plus (2) the writing of the essay, normally in the 
senior year. The nine semester hours completed will count toward the thirty 
semester hours required for the major and will be counted for purposes of 
distribution in the appropriate area within the major. Alternatively, instead of 
writing the essay, a student may take six semester hours in graduate level 
courses. 

Admission to the honors program will, as a rule, occur in the spring of the 
sophomore year at the time majors are selected. Others may be admitted 
during the junior year. Double majors are eligible for the program. Admission 
requires the approval of the departmental director of undergraduate studies, 
Mr. Cuthbertson. 

Program in Managerial Studies. The Department of Political Science 
participates in the interdepartmental program in managerial studies. More 
information on the program may be obtained from the program description 
given on pages 55 and 109. The departmental adviser for this program is 
Mr.'Cuthbertson. 

Graduate Program. The Department of Political Science offers a grad- 
uate program leading to the Ph.D. The student is expected to complete forty- 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 241 

eight semester hours in advanced courses or seminars prior to candidacy and to 
present a dissertation displaying original research. Normally the student will 
take the core course and one other seminar or course in American government, 
comparative government, and international relations, plus a two-semester 
course in scope and methods. The student will also be expected to have some 
background in statistical analysis and in traditional political theory prior to 
candidacy. The student is expected to take comprehensive written examina- 
tions in two of the three major fields (American government, comparative 
government, and international relations)afterthecompletionof(l) course work 
in the department, (2) two courses in a minor field outside political science, and 
(3) the language requirement. The language requirement may be fulfilled 
through (a) satisfactory language skills in two foreign languages, (b) one lan- 
guage and advanced course in statistics, or (c) high level of skill in one language 
sufficient to use it in advanced research. The language program and minor of 
the individual student should be decided in consultation with the faculty 
adviser. A limited master's program is also offered by the department. 



Political Science Courses 

209b. Introduction to Constitutionalism and Modern Political Thought 

(3-0-3). 

Constitutionalism and authoritarianism from Machiavelli to Marx; introduction to contem- 
porary ideologies. Together with Political Science 210 or 210H meets state professional require- 
ments for teachers. Mr. Cuthbertson, Staff 

210a. Introduction to American Government and Politics (3-0-3). 

Major topics in American politics: public opinion, group politics, political parties, elections, 
congressional-presidential-bureaucratic politics, and judicial politics. Together with Political 
Science 209 meets state professional requirements for teachers. Mr. Brady. Staff 

210. Introduction to American Government and Politics — Honors (3-0-3).t 

An honors course covering the same material given in Political Science 210a. Permission of 

the instructor required. Together with 209, this course meets state professional requirements 

for teachers. Mi.^^ Satider.^ 

211b. Introduction to International Relations (3-0-3). 

Analysis of basic factors in world politics from the balance of power to multipolarity. 
Discusses new meaning of peace. Mr. Doran 

212a. Introduction to Comparative Government (3-0-3). 

A comparison of political patterns in selected "developed" and "developing" political systems 
including democratic and communist examples. Mr. Di.r 

305a, 306b. Directed Reading I, II (0-0-3 each semester). 

Independent reading under the supervision of a member of the department. Open to junior 
majors in the honors program and to others in special cases with the consent of the department. 

Staff 

309a, 310b. Law and Society (3-0-3 each semester). 

An examination of the nature of law and of justice; employment of the casebook method to 
study specific aspects of the law. Mr. Hudspeth 

314a. Polities of Energy and the Environment (3-0-3). 

Political aspects of environmental protection, the population explosion, energy, and resource 
scarcity at local, national, and international levels. Mr. Doran 

315a. President and Congress in American Polities (3-0-3). 

Examination of the two major policy making institutions in the United States: the Congress 
and the President. Mr. Cooper 

321a. American Constitutional Law (3-0-3). 

This course deals with the interpretation of the Constitution by the Supreme Court. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 



242 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

325a. Criminal Justice (3-0-3). 

The cause of crime and response to crime, including the organization and activities of the 
police, lawyers, courts, and prisons. Mr. Gow 

326. Politics of the Judicial System (3-0-3).t 

How does politics influence the judiciary and how does the judiciary influence politics? The 
federal courts, both trial and appellate, will be the focus. Mr. Gow 

331a. American Political Parties and Electoral Behavior (3-0-3). 

The nature and functions of contemporary American political parties, including character- 
istics of party systems, party organization, elite recruitment, political socialization, and voting 
behavior. Staff 

333b. Southern Politics (3-0-3). 

An historical and contemporary overview of Southern Politics. Miss Sanders 

335. Systems Analysis and American Politics (3-0-3). t 

Various systems approaches to politics, including general systems theory, Parsonian 
systems theory, and organization theory. Mr. Cooper 

337a. Bureaucracy and Public Policy (3-0-3). 

The role public bureaucracy plays in national policy making process. Sources of agency 
power will be examined and then linked to different policy outcomes. Staff 

339b. Public Policy (3-0-3). 

This course examines American public policy at the national level and concerns both the 
contents of public policy and the politics involved. Miss Sanders 

340a. Ancient and Medieval Political Theory (3-0-3). 

The sources of ancient and medieval political thought. Special emphasis on historical 
analysis of political philosphy and methodology and the influence of Plato and Aristotle. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 
344a. Contemporary Political Ideology (3-0-3). 

Elements of major ideologies including nationalism, democracy, socialism, and revolution 
and their spokesmen in Afro-Asia and the West. Mr. von der Mehden 

351. The Politics of Southeast Asia (3-0-3).t 

Political processes, institutions, and attitudes in selected Southeast Asian states. Emphasis 
on the post war period but traditional forces influencing contemporary political behavior also 
considered. Mr. von der Mehden 

353. Politics of China and Japan (3-0-3).t 

Political processes, institutions, and attitudes of China and Japan; emphasis on post-war 
developments in relation to traditional patterns, political ideology, and international politics. 

Mr. von der Mehden 

354b. Latin American Politics (3-0-3). 

A study of the political process in contemporary Latin America, with particular attention to 
selected major countries. Mr. Dix 

360. Western European Democracies (3-0-3).t 

A survey of government and politics in Western European democracies; with primary 
emphasis on Great Britain, France, and Germany. Mr. Ambler 

361. Comparative Communist Systems (3-0-3).t 

A survey of government and politics in selected communist systems, including the U.S.S.R. 
and Communist China. Mr. Ambler 

371a. Comparative Foreign Policy (3-0-3). 

A survey and comparative analysis of the foreign policies and policy-making systems of 
selected countries, including China, Japan, and Soviet Union. Mr. Harris 

372a. The Conduct and Control of American Foreign Policy (3-0-3). 

Examines the internal and external aspects of foreign policy leadership, presidential 
initiative, congressional control, press, public opinion, crisis management. Mr. Harris 

374. Oil, Cartels, and Changing World Order (3-0-3).t 

A study of the spectacular success of OPEC, its durability, political impact, relationship to 
other alliances, and the emergence of other cartels and commercial blocs. Mr. Doran 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 243 

375b. International Organizations (3-0-3). 

Survey of political processes in regional and global intergovernmental organizations and 
policy problems created by conditions of global interdependence. Mr. Harris 

377. Imperialism (3-0-3).t 

The origins and meaning of imperialism in the twentieth century. Mr. Doran 

378. Politics of American National Security (3-0-3).t 

Major issues in national security policy, including strategic doctrines, policy making pro- 
cesses on defense issues, arms control, and nuclear proliferation. Mr. Harris 

379. Problems in International Relations (3-0-3).t 

This course will examine a major issue in international relations and the contributions of the 
social sciences to an understanding and/or solution to that question. Staff 

386. Political Socialization (3-0-3).t 

The ways in which political knowledge, attitudes, and values are acquired and modified. 
Emphasis on political socialization as a particular kind of social learning. Staff 

405a, 406b. Senior Thesis (0-0-3 each semester). 

Open to senior honors majors with the permission of the department. Students must 
complete both Political Science 405 and 406 to obtain credit. Staff 

410. Seminar in Adjudication of Current Social Issues (3-0-3).t 

The current state of law and court delay, family planning, abortion, euthanasia, drugs, con- 
sumerism, privacy, environment, the poor, etc. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Hud.^peth 

454. Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements (3-0-3). t 

Causes and outcomes of revolutions, both past and contemporary, and their relationships to 
the societies in which they occur. Mr. Dix 

457a. The Conditions of Democracy (3-0-3). 

Seminar on social, economic, psychological, historical, cultural, and political roots of 
democracy and of its principal modern antitheses: communism and facism. Mr. Dix 

460b. Seminar in Comparative Government (3-0-3). 

In 1978-79 this seminar will deal with political parties and voting behavior in Western 
democracies. Mr. Ambler 

470. Research Seminar in International Relations (3-0-3).t 

Conflict modeling and quantitative analysis of alliance formation, foreign aid, regime 
structures, ideologies, and arms races as they affect the probability of war. Mr. Doran 

472b. Seminar in American Foreign Policy (3-0-3). 

The content of American foreign policy, its sources, and the process of policy formulation. 

Mr. Harris 

475. Seminar in Transnational Organizations and Processes (3-0-3). t 

Selected topics in the analysis of transnational politics and processes, such as the role of 
multinational corporations, the functioning of international organizations, transnational move- 
ments, and global policy problems. Mr. Harris 

486. Topics in American Politics (3-0-3).t 

Seminar on politics of sectionalism. Miss Sanders 

490b. Research Seminar in Modern Political Theory and Interdisciplinary 
Fields (3-0-3). 

The 1978-1979 topic is Texas Politics. Mr. Cuthbertson 

495a. Introduction to Statistics (3-0-3). 

Investigation of the basic concepts and techniques in probability theory and statistical 
inference. Begins with a review of selected mathematical topics. Mr. Gow 

503b. Special Topics in Research Methods and Data Analysis (3-0-3). 

Applications of least squares and general linear model. Mr. Gow 

510b. Scope and Methods (3-0-3). 

Introduction to research in political science, problems of the discipline, and basic political 
concepts. History of political science as a discipline. Mr. Cooper 



244 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

511b. Measurement and Research Design (3-0-3). 

Research design. Measurement theory. Data collection and modes of analysis. Use of the 
computer in political research. Theory building. Staff 

520. Approaches to Comparative Government (3-0-3).t 

Core graduate course analyzing basic approaches to the study of comparative government. 
Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. Mr. von der Mehden 

527b. Organization Theory I (3-0-3). 

An intensive and extensive study of the theory of large-scale organizations in both the private 
and public sectors. Prerequisite: Administration 511. Also offered as Administration 514. 

Mr. Cooper 

528a. Organization Theory II (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Political Science 527. Also offered as Administration 515. Mr. Cooper 

530a. Approaches to American Government (3-0-3). 

Core graduate course analyzing basic approaches to study of American politics. 

Miss Sanders 

538. Management of Bureaucracy (3-0-3).t 

The management of public sector organizations: communications, management styles. 
organizational design, budgeting, motivation, planning, organizational change, staffing, and 
recruitment. Emphasis on public sector problems. Also offered as Administration 517. Mr. Meier 

540a. Approaches to International Relations (3-0-3). 

Core graduate course analyzing basic approaches to the study of international relations. 
Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. Mr. Doran 

542b. International Problems of Energy Supply (3-0-3). 

Explores the energy question as a global imbalance between energy demand and supply: the 
policies of major consumer nations and OPEC's imbalance. Also offered as Administration 574. 

Mr. Doran 

570. Seminar in Comparative Government (3-0-3^t 

Readings and original research on selected topics. Mr. Dix 

571a. International Relations and Business I (3-0-3). 

Emphasizes through comparative political analysis the societal conditions in the advanced 
industrial and developing countries and their impact on business. Also offered as Administration 

571. Mr. von der Mehden 

580b. Seminar in American Politics (3-0-3). 

Congress and the presidency; the relevance and contribution of organization theory to the 
study of these institutions. Staff 

590. Scope and Method of Current Research in International Relations 

(3-0-3).t 

Critical survey of empirical research of diverse topics in international relations: research 
design, data acquisition, and hypothesis testing. 

591a, 592b. Directed Reading in Methodology and Research Design (0-0-3 
each semester). Staff 

593a, 594b. Directed Reading in American Politics (0-0-3 each semester). 

Staff 

595a, 596b. Directed Reading in International Relations (0-0-3 each 
semester). Staff 

597a. 598b. Directed Reading in Comparative Politics (0-0-3 each semester). 

Staff 

600a,b. Topics in Political Science. 

Research and thesis for resident students. Staff 

700c. Summer Study and Research. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 245 

Psychology 



Professor Howell, Chairmou 

Professors Brelsford, Schum, and Wann 

Associate Professor Dipboye 

Assistant Professors Burnett, Dorfman, D.M. Lane, Rathjen, 

and Schuberth 

Adjunct Professor R.L. Bell 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Major in Psychology. Twenty-seven semester hours (nine courses) are 
required for a major (single or multiple) in psychology. Psychology 201 is 
required for all majors and 339, 340 are strongly recommended. Specific course 
sequences are developed individually for each student in accordance with his or 
her pattern of interests and goals. Most courses are also open to nonmajors 
subject to the approval of the instructors. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Graduate Studies in Psychology. Graduate programs are offered at both 
the M.A. and Ph.D. levels. The emphasis, however, is upon doctoral training, 
and only applicants of the Ph.D. caliber will be admitted. 

A research thesis with public oral defense is required for both master's and 
Ph.D. degrees. In addition, sixty semester hours must be accumulated for the 
Ph.D. and thirty for the master's. Included in this total are required courses in 
the areas of learning, physiological, social, and methodology plus whatever 
offerings are available in the student's specialty area. The two specialty areas 
currently offered are cognitive-experimental, industrial-organizational/social. 

Competence in a foreign language is not required. The student must, 
however, pass an admission-to-candidacy procedure designed to establish his 
or her expertise in the chosen specialty era. 

Psychology Courses 

201a,b. Introduction to Psychology (3-0-3). 

Major concepts, methods, and theories of modern psychology as they relate to everyday life. 

Mr. Dorfman, Mr. Schuberth 

303a. Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3-0-3). 

An overview of the principles, techniques, and theories of psychology applied in the in- 
dustrial setting. Mr. Dipboye 

305a. Introductory Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

Theories and research in social psychology with emphasis given to the implications for 
societal problems and interpersonal dynamics. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

Mr. Dipboye, Ms. Rathjen 

307a. Learning (3-0-3). 

Introductory survey of issues, theories, research, and applications in learning and memory. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Ms. Burnett 

308b. Human Learning and Cognition (3-0-3). 

Emphasis upon current status of research and theory in such topics as verbal learning, 
memory and forgetting, and mnemonics. Prerequisite: Psychology 201, 307. Ms. Burnett 



246 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

312b. Developmental Psychology (3-0-3). 

Focus on behavioral changes with age and general laws of development in both human and 
nonhuman species. Prerequisite: Psychology 201 or consent of instructor. 

Mr. Lane, Mr. Schuberth 

329a. Differential Psychology (3-0-3). 

Techniques for measuring individual differences and critical review of theories of individual 
differences in intelligence and personality. Prerequisite; Psychology 201. Mr. Wann 

330b. Personality Theory (3-0-3). 

Concepts and techniques of personality study. A continuation of Psychology 329, which is a 
prerequisite. Mr. Wann 

332b. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior (3-0-3). 

Various aspects of human behavior including personality functions and abnormal behavior. 
May be repeated with instructor's permission. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Ms. Rathjen 

333. Social Motivation (3-0-3).t 

Both social processes and personality factors (self-esteem, sex differences) will be examined 
as they relate to motivation. 

339a. Methods in Experimental Psychology (3-0-3). 

This course will present both quantitative and non-quantitative methods applicable to 
research in experimental psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology 201 and permission of instructor. 

Mr. Brelsford 

340b. Experimental Research in Psychology (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Psychology 339 with a stronger emphasis on individual student experi- 
ments and the writing of research reports. Prerequisite: Psychology 339 or Mathematical 
Sciences 280 and permission of instructor. Mr. Brelsford 

341. Animal Behavior (3-0-3).t 

The ontogeny, evolution, adaptive significance, and physiology of animal behavior with 
concepts drawn from psychology and ethology. Prerequisite: Psychology 307 and permission of 
instructor. Ms. Burnett 

351. The Psychology of Perception (3-0-3).t 

Critical evaluation of data, theories, and methods in the area of human perception. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 201. 

362a. Physiological Psychology — A Keller Method Course (3-0-3). 

An overview of the neurophysiological correlates of behavior. Mr. Howell 

404b. Advanced Learning and Memory (3-0-3). 

An examination of method, theory, and research in the study of cognitive processes. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Psychology 307 and permission of instructor. Ms. Burnett 

409a, 410b. Developmental Social Psychology (3-0-3 each semester). 

Major topics include adolescence, comparative social psychology, and theories and problems 
of social psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and senior standing. Mr. Wann 

413a. Advanced Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in the experimental and theoretical content of modern social psychology. 
Topic this year: Applications of social psychology and behavior modification. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201, 305, and permission of instructor. Ms. Rathjen 

421a. Senior Seminar in Psychology (3-0-3). 

A seminar on special topics of interest to particular staff members. Topic announced each 
semester. May be repeated. Mr. Dorfman 

431a,b. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with instructor's 
approval. Ms. Rathjen 

433a,b. Advanced Research Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with instructor's 
approval. Staff 

434. Psychopathology (3-0-3).t 

Theoretical and applied isues in selected forms of deviant behavior with emphasis on treat- 
ment. Prerequisite: Psychology 332 and permission of instructor. 



PSYCHOLOGY 247 

435a, 436b. Advanced Research Topics in Industrial Organization (3-0-3 

each semester). 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with instructor's 
approval. Staff 

437a, 438b. Advanced Research Topics in Advanced General Psychology 

(3-0-3 each semester). 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with instructor's 
approval. Staff 

440b. Sensory Psychology (3-0-3). 

A study of phenomena, methods, and theory in contemporary research on visual and 
auditory processes. Prerequisite: Open only to undergraduate majors and graduate students in 
psychology'. Mr. Schum 

444b. Evidentiary Processes in Jurisprudence (3-0-3). 

This course will involve a study of the inferential behavior of the factfinder (judge/juror) in 
legal proceedings. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

452. Human Performance Theory (3-0-3).t 

Survey of research on those aspects of human behavior relevant to design of man-machine 
systems. 

491a, 492b. Independent Study and Research (3-0-3 each semester). 

May be repeated for credit. Staff 

509a, 510b. Advanced Psychological Statistics (3-0-3 each semester). 

Descriptive and inferential statistics for beginning graduate students in psychology. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. Mr. Lane 

511. Research Strategies in Social Psychology (3-0-3).t 

512b. Theories of Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

Comprehensive survey with focus on psychology of the individual in relation to social groups. 
Students will develop thorough working knowledge of theoretical literature and explore selected 
areas in depth. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Ms. Rathjen 

513, 514. Topics in Quantitative Methods and Research Design (3-0-3 each 

semester). t Mr. Lane, Mr. Schum 

515a. Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Staff 

516b. Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3). 

The 1979 topic will be: Cognitive development. Mr. Schuberth 

517. Professional Issues in Psychology (3-0-3).t Mr. Howell 

520a,b. Topics in Engineering Psychology (3-0-3). Staff 

521a. Advanced Learning and Memory (3-0-3). Mr. Brehford. Ms. Burnett 
522b. Topics in Learning and Memory (3-0-3). Mr. Brelsford 

530a. Topics in Industrial-Organizational Psychology (3-0-3). Mr. Dorfman 

551a, 552b. Graduate Research in Psychology (3-0-3 each semester). 

Supervised literature, laboratory, and field research projects. Staff 

553a, 554b. Graduate Teaching in Psychology (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 
700c. Summer Graduate Research in Psychology (3-0-3). 
800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



248 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Religious Studies 



Professor Neilsen, Chairman; Professors Sellers and Newport 

Associate Professor Kelber 

Visiting Associate Professor Haugh 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Dunn and Sanborn 

Lecturers Benjamin, T.F. Freeman, Shaper, and Sherman 



Degrees offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Majors. All undergraduates majoring in religious 
studies are expected to enroll in one of the introductory courses offered at the 
freshman or sophomore level. A total of twenty-four semester hours (eight 
courses) in advanced courses are required for completion of the major. At least 
six semester hours (two courses) are to be elected in each of the following areas 
represented in the department: 

1. Historic and Biblical studies 

2. Interpretation, theology, comparative religions 

3. Religion in the modern world 

Qualified upperclassmen will be given an opportunity to engage in independent 
work. Related courses offered by other departments may be taken for credit in 
religious studies with the approval of the major adviser. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 51. 

Graduate Study. The Department of Religious Studies offers graduate 
work in a variety of fields: ethics, Judeo-Christian origins, philosophy of 
religion, and theology. In keeping with the traditions of Rice University, study 
and research are not confessionally oriented. The awarding of advanced 
degrees is not based solely on the accumulation of credits or compliance with 
formal requirements. Course plans are determined according to the prepara- 
tion, needs, and interests of the candidate. A capacity for independent work is 
considered essential to study in the department. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department; 
normally, this will include twenty-four semester hours in advanced courses 
plus thesis work 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in French or German 

3. Satisfactory performance on preliminary written and oral examinations in 
the field of religious studies; normally, these will include Biblical studies, 
philosophy of religion, and ethics, with detailed attention to the area of 
thesis specialization 

4. Completion of an acceptable thesis 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department; 
normally, this will include fifty-four semester hours, counting that given for 
the degree of Master of Arts. Six of these semester hours may be waived upon 
petition to the graduate faculty after the first year. Normal minimum resi- 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 249 

dence is at least two years, even for candidates already holding advanced 
degrees. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in both French and 
German 

3. Satisfactory performance on preliminary written and oral examinations in 
religious studies. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are expected to prepare 
themselves for four qualifying examinations (Biblical studies, philosophy of 
religion, ethics, etc.), at least two of which must be in their major area of 
concentration. 

4. Completion of a dissertation approved by the department 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the dissertation 
and related fields 



Religion Courses 

Ilia. Relig:ion and Culture (3-0-3). 

The Religion Game-I. Examination of major traditions East and West. Religion in human 
experience: personal, historical, cultural and theological dimensions. Mr. Nielsen, Staff 

112b. Religion and Culture (3-0-3). 

The Religion Game-II. Religious alternatives. The secular vs. the sacred. Competing world 
views, East and West. Mr. Niel.'^en, Staff 

117a. American Religion (3-0-3). 

A survey of religion in the U.S. and Canada from the colonial to the contemporary period. 
Attention to continuing problems and issues, internal and external, to organized religion. Staff 

202b. Atheism (3-0-3). 

Readings in Marx, Feuerbach, Nietzsche, Sartre, Ernst Bloch, as well as classical theistic 
arguments. Staff 

203a. The Radical Revolutionaries of Thought (3-0-3). 

Study of the founders of the great religions as well as contemporary thinkers. Mr. Haugh 

204b. Diety, Mysticism, and the Occult (3-0-3). 

Critical, phenomenological study of psychology of religion and the occult. Comparative use 
of the categories of the Western and Eastern traditions. Mr. Newport 

205a. Futurology and Religion (3-0-3). 

Critical study of representative secular and religious futurologies, Utopias, and eschatolo- 
gies. Attention given to religious perspectives on planetary, global, biological, and sociological 
engineering. Mr. Newport 

221, 222. First- Year Hebrew (3-0-3 each semester).! 

301a. Mysticism and Existentialism (3-0-3). 

Examination of these two approaches to life in the Christian and non-Christian literature, 
ancient and modern. Miss Dunne 

303. Job and Hebrew Prophets (3-0-3).t 

304. Modern Jewish Thought (3-0-3).t 

305a. Introduction to Judaism (3-0-3). 

Study of Biblical monotheism, Talmud, Jewish philosophy, mysticism, and contemporary 
reinterpretation. Mr. Sherman 

306b. The Modern Jew: Despair Vs. Happiness (3-0-3). 

Examination of the meaning of the Holocaust for Jews and Christians through literature, 
art, poetry, and other memoirs. Prerequisite: Religious Studies HI, 112 or other approved 
courses. Mr. Sherman 

307a. Jesus in History (3-0-3). 

The life of Jesus viewed against the background of the political, social, cultural, economic, 
and religious history of his time. Mr. Kelber 



308. Synoptic Gospels (3-0-3).t 



250 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

310b. Pauline Theology (3-0-3). 

Introduction into the theological controversies between Paul and anti-Pauline Christians. 

Mr. Kelber 

311a. History of Religion: The Far Eastern Tradition (3-0-3). 

Readings in the holy books of India, China and Japan. Study of Hinduism. Buddhism, 
Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Mrs. Shaper 

312b. History of Religion: The Western Tradition (3-0-3). 

Study of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in their historical development. Attention to the 
basic themes of Western theism. Miss Dunne 

315a. Hebrew Religion: Law and History (3-0-3). 

Religious values of the Pentateuch and historical books. Traditions and composition. Isreal's 
religious symbols, cosmology, anthropology, and legislation against its Near Eastern back- 
ground. Mr. Benjamin 

316b. Hebrew Religion: Psalms and Prophets (3-0-3). 

Origin and nature of Hebrew poetry and prophecy. Human dimensions. Character of Isreal's 
beginnings and faith. Religious themes and individual writers. Mr. Benjamin 

331a. Psychology of Religion (3-0-3). 

Study of the primary developments that have taken place in the field, with particular 
emphasis on changing issues and methods. Mr. Sanborn 

334b. Problems in Psychology of Religion (3-0-3). 

Significant contemporary problems are examined from a clinical standpoint — e.g., idea of 
God, evil, anxiety, guilt, and therapeutic process. Mr. Sanborn 

345a. Ethics and the Life Cycle I (3-0-3). 

Birth, death, and life's "stages": an overview. Readings from Erikson, Kierkegaard, Skinner, 
mythology and theology. Not open to freshmen. Mr. Sellers 

346b. Ethics and the Life Cycle H (3-0-3). 

Concrete problems of the life cycle, including sex ethics, medical ethics, aging, death, and 
dying. Not open to freshmen. Mr. Sellers 

347a. Varieties of Contemporary Religion (3-0-3). 

Varying religious life styles, traditional and non-traditional, in the Indian, Black, Mexican- 
American, Islamic, and Jewish communities. Worship, sacred literature, ethics, community 
involvement, evangelical efforts. Field trips, guests, discussion. Mr. Freeman 

348b. Community Ethical Dilemmas (3-0-3). 

Current community problems and their ethical and religious implications: drugs, race, 
inequities, poverty, law enforcement, religious intolerance. Guest speakers, visitations. 

Mr. Freeman 

362b. Myth, Evil and Immortality (3-0-3). 

Special attention to the thought of Mircea Eliade and Paul Ricoeur. Staff 

374a. Religious Experience (3-0-3). 

Mystical experience and popular religious movements as diverse aspects of traditional 
Christianity. Staff 

375a. Man in the Cosmos (3-0-3). 

Fundamental questions on the nature of man and his place in the universe. Mm Dunne 

376b. Origin and Destiny of the Universe (3-0-3). 

Major cosmological theories and their affect on both religious and secular thinking. 

Miss Dunne 

401a, 402b. Independent Study (3-0-3 each semester). Staff 

415. Contemporary Moral Problems (3-0-3).t 

443b. Moral Conflict in America (3-0-3). 

Men and movements illustrative of the moral-religious dimensions in the American expe- 
rience. Prerequisite: two semesters of history, philosophy, or religion. Mr. Sellers 

444. American Manners and Morals (3-0-3).t 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 251 

453a, 454b. History of Christianity I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Study of representative thinkers of the Reformation and Enlightenment periods, together 
with contemporary history. Staff 

462b. Recent Protestant Theology and Ethics (3-0-3). 

Emphasis on Karl Barth, Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr. Prerequisite: two semesters of 
history, philosophy, or religion Staff 

501a, 502b. Research and Thesis (Credit variable). Staff 

506. Seminar in the Synoptic Gospels (3-0-3). t 

507a. Pauline Theology (3-0-3). Mr. Kelber 

508. The Gospel of John (3-0-3).t 

511a, 512b. Seminar in Hebrew Religion I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Mr. Benjamin 

521a. Readings in Non-Christian Religious Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Critical examination of major traditions of Indian and Chinese philosophy: historical 
development and modern expressions of Hindu and Buddhist thought. 

Staff 

522a. Seminar in Philosophical Theology (3-0-3). 

Mr. Newport 

523a, 524b. Independent Study (Credit variable) 

Staff 

525. Seminar in the Problem of Religious Knowledge (3-0-3).t 
526b. Seminar in Contemporary Theology (3-0-3). 



528. Ecumenical Theology Seminar (3-0-3).t 

529. Religious Knowledge in Historical Perspective (3-0-3).t 

530. Seminar in Historical Theology (3-0-3).t 
533a. Methodology in Historical Theology (3-0-3). 

541a. Seminar in Ethics (3-0-3). 

543. Seminar in Social Ethics (3-0-3).t 

544b. Seminar in Theology and Ethics (3-0-3). 

552b. Seminar in History of Religion (3-0-3). 

700c. Summer Graduate Research (3-0-3). 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 



Mr. Newport 



Mr. Mp/.sew 
Mr. Sellers 

Mr. Sellers 

Mr. Nielsen 

Staff 



252 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Sociology 



Associate Professor Klineberg, Chairman 

Professor C. Gordon 

Associate Professors Davidson and W.C. Martin 

Assistant Professor Long 

Degree Offered: B.A. 

The Undergraduate Major in Sociology is designed to enable students 
to gain greater understanding of the nature of human societies, as an important 
part of a liberal education, as a foundation for a variety of occupations, and as 
preparation for graduate study. The program provides students with consid- 
erable latitude in pursuing substantive interests, while ensuring a basic famil- 
iarity with theoretical approaches and issues of methodology. Majors in sociol- 
ogy are not required to take a foreign language; those planning graduate 
study, however, should be aware that many graduate departments of sociology 
require demonstrated comeptence in at least one foreign language. A min- 
imum of twenty-four semester hours (eight courses) in sociology must be 
passed, of which at least eighteen semester hours (six courses) must be at the 
advanced level. In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, 
students must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete at least 
60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a total pro- 
gram of at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, 
pages 50 and 51. 

Requirements for the major in sociology are: (1) Sociology 203; (2) at least 
one of the two courses emphasizing theoretical apporaches: Sociology 316, 353; 
(3) Sociology 421 and 423; and (4) at least fifteen semester hours (five courses) 
in the substantive areas of sociological specialization. A statistics course such 
as Mathematical Sciences 221, 280, 301, 380, 480, or 481 may be iised as one of 
these. 

All sociology courses listed are regularly offered by the present faculty, 
although not necessarily every year. Additional courses may be offered with 
the addtion of new faculty or variations in present course assignements; simi- 
larly, some courses may be discontinued from the regular offerings. It is the 
responsibility of the student to consult the listing of university distribution 
requirements before registering and to be certain to satisfy all the require- 
ments for his or her degree. The registration of every sociology major must be 
signed by a departmental adviser. 

The Honors Program in Sociology. The honors program is designed (1) 
to provide undergraduates whose primary concentration is in the field of 
sociology with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the sociologi- 
cal perspective through a two-semester program of directed independent 
research and writing, and (2) to provide an opportunity for the recognition of 
undergraduates who have demonstrated unusual competence in sociology and 
capacity for sustained independent research. 

To be eligible for the program, a student must have maintained a 2 
average in at least four sociology courses beyond the introductory level. 
During the first semester of the junior year, students who meet this require- 
ment are invited to submit, no later than two weeks prior to registration for the 
spring semester, a description of their proposed research project to the Under- 
graduate Honors Committee (Professor Chandler Davidson, chairman). This 
committee, in consultation with the candidate, will evaluate the proposal in 



SOCIOLOGY 253 

terms of both its feasibility and its sociological significance. Upon acceptance 
into the program, the student will be assigned a faculty adviser who will 
supervise the student's independent research and the selection of further 
courses relevant to the project. It is expected that all honors candidates will 
have completed Sociology 421 and 423 before beginning their second semester 
of honors research. 

Honor students will register for two successive semesters of directed 
honors research (Sociology 492, 493). The first semester will normally be de- 
voted to a review of the relevant literature and the preparation of a detailed 
outline of the planned research. The research itself will normally be carried 
out during the second semester and written up as a completed honors thesis by 
the end of that period. 

The thesis will be read and evaluated by two other faculty members in 
addition to the student's primary adviser, followed by an oral examination 
open to the public. These three faculty members will share responsibility for 
determining departmental honors, based on the student's performance in the 
program as a whole. 
Sociology Courses 

203a. Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the principal concepts, theories, and methods of the field of sociology. 

Mr. Martin 
204b. Contemporary American Society (3-0-3). 

Distinctive organizational and structural characteristics of modern American society 
considered in relation to cultural norms and values. Review and critique of leading social 
analysts. Ms. Long 

230. Race and Ethnic Relations (3-0-3).t 

The study of race and ethnicity in American life. Review of sociological research comple- 
mented by readings in ethnic literature, such as biography and the novel. 

300b. Social Stratification (3-0-3). 

Social inequality in human societies. American stratification is compared with other 
systems. Theories of inequality are examined. Experiments in abolishing stratification are 
discussed. Mr. Davidson 

305a. Sociology of Sex Roles (3-0-3). 

Relationship between gender and social role. Development of the contemporary sexual 
division of labor and processes of socialization with reference to family, education, media, and 
occupations. Ms-. Long 

311. Collective Behavior (3-0-3).t 

Consideration of relatively noninstitutionalized conduct: crowds, mobs, publics, social move- 
ments; conditions and consequences of social unrest, excitement, panic, and protest. 

316b. Basic Trends in Sociological Theory (3-0-3). 

Conflict/integration theory, symbolic interactionism, structural-functionalism and ex- 
change theory as influenced by Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, as well as Parsons, Mills, and 
Merton. Mr. Gordon 

319a. The Sociology of Occupations (3-0-3). 

The influence of occupation upon life style, values, social and economic status, and views of 
the world. Field work by the student is encouraged. Mr. Davidson 

321. Criminology (3-0-3).t 

Types of criminal behavior, theories of crime and juvenile deliquency, with attention to the 
role of police, courts, correction agencies, and other social structures. 

326b. Sociology of Situational Interaction (3-0-3). 

Interpretation and normative regulation of face-to-face interaction. Presentation of self 
and allocation of involvement in different social situations. Field observations will be included. 

Mr. Gordon 

827a, 328b. Problems in Media and Sociology (3-0-3 each semester). 

A focused independent study relating media and substantive sociology. Also listed as 
Anthropology 327, 328 and Arts 327, 328. 



254 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

329. The New Shape of Work (3-0-3).t 

An examination of critical changes in work discipline and occupational structure during 
the nineteenth century, and of efforts to assess the meaning of those changes. Also offered as 
History 329. 

331. Politics and Society in Texas (3-0-3).t 

The political sociology of the state. Special emphasis on research. 

336. Mass Communications (3-0-3).t 

Analysis of the structure, social context, and effects of large-scale impersonal com- 
munication to dispersed and heterogeneous audiences, through both print and electronic 
media. 

353a. PersonaHty, Social Structure, and Culture, I (3-0-3). 

Interrelations between personality and social systems, as seen by psychoanalysis, behavior- 
ism, Piaget, and the symbolic interactionists; the changing conceptions of man in the be- 
havioral sciences. Mr. Klineberg 

354b. Personality, Social Structure, and Culture, II (3-0-3). 

Attitudes, conformity and deviance, psychological dimensions of social change. Relation 
of psychology, sociology, and anthropology to individual behavior and the persistence of social 
systems. Prerequisite: Sociology 353 or permission of the instructor. Mr. Klineberg 

356b. Sociology of Health and Illness (3-0-3). 

The social and cultural factors that influence the development of physical and mental dis- 
orders and the delivery of health care within American society. Mr. Kaplan 

370. Sociology of Education (3-0-3).t 

Social inequality in education from two sociological perspectives: the cultural deprivationist 
perspective and the interactionist perspectives of Goffman and Cicourel. 

381a. Small Groups (3-0-3). 

Analysis of individual-group conflict, group development, communication between 
members, and small groups as the carriers of culture, based in part on experience in a self- 
study group. Ms. Huddle 

391a. Sociology of Leisure (3-0-3). 

Leisure activity (relaxation, diversion, personal development, creativity and sensual trans- 
cendence) in relation to work, family, education, income, socio-economic status, and life-cycle 
stage. Mr. Gordon 

403a, 403b. Independent Study (0-0-3 each semester). 

412b. Social Change (3-0-3). 

Processes of social change from the perspectives of leading theorists and recent research; 
individual and collective responses to the transformations in modern societies. Mr. Klineberg 

421a. Introduction to Research Methods (3-0-3). 

Examination of the major objectives, strategies, and tactics of social science research, 
combined with practical experience in conducting an empirical project. Laboratory (Sociology 
423) required. Mr. Gordon, Ms. Long 

423a. Introduction to Research Methods Laboratory (0-3-1). 

A three-hour laboratory devoted to a class project, including literature review, hypotheses 
formulation, research design, data collection, and analysis. Mr. Gordon, Ms. Long 

425a. Political Sociology (3-0-3). 

An examination of the distribution of power in American society. Particular attention is 
given to the relation of class and ethnicity to politics. Mr. Davidson 

426b. The Sociology of Marx (3-0-3). 

Sociological aspects of Marx's theory: class, alienation, ideology, and historical material- 
ism. Marx's predictions in light of twentieth-century developments. Sociological critiques and 
revisions of Marxism. Mr. Davidson 

429a. Sociology of Religion (3-0-3). 

Religious beliefs, symbols, actions, organizations, roles, and various interrelationships 
between religion and society, new religious movements, secularization, and functional alter- 
natives to religion. Field Work. Mr. Martin 



SOCIOLOGY 255 

431. Sociology of the Life-Cycle, I (3-0-3).t 

Seminar analyzing socialization, interaction patterns, self-conception development, and 
aspirations during infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Effects of sex role, family structure, 
social class, and ethnicity. 

432. Sociology of the Life-Cycle, II (3-0-3).t 

Seminar analyzing identity transformations, adult socialization, occupation, family, role 
losses, and death from young adulthood through old age. Effects of sex role, social class, 
ethnicity. 

434. Family Structures and Processes (3-0-3).t 

Analysis of role structure, sexuality, and interaction patterns in the "standard" U.S. 
nuclear family and its alternatives in diverse social settings. 

436b. Sociology and Literature (3-0-3). 

The interconnections between literature and society, considered from a range of theoretical 
perspectives. The uses of literary materials as "evidence" in sociological analysis. Ms. Long 

440. Complex Organizations (3-0-3).t 

Organizational structure and social processes within large-scale organizations; the impact 
of change and conflict, informal and formal norms, alienation, and professionalization. 

446. Urban Sociology (3-0-3).t 

Urban growth and physical structure, the quality of human relations and of cultural and 
individual survival in an urbanized society, and strategies of response. 

471. Popular Culture (3-0-3).t 

Examination and analysis of social origins, significance, and implications of various types 
of media, arts, and popular entertainments. Enrollment limited. Permission of instructor 
required. 

480. Sociology of the Future (3-0-3).t 

Processes that underlie the transformation of American society; educational and occupa- 
tional changes, social movements, and personal values, as they interact to shape the future. 

492b, 493a. Directed Honors Research (3-0-3 each semester). 

Sociological research under faculty supervision. First semester: review of revelant lit- 
erature and preparation of outline for planned research. Research carried out and honors thesis 
completed during the second semester. Open only to students in sociology honors program. 

Staff 

Space Physics and Astronomy 



Professor Michel, Chairman; Professors H.R. Anderson, Chamberlain, 

Clayton, Cloutier, Dessler, J.W. Freeman, W.E. Gordon, Haymes, 

Heymann, N.S. Lane, Stebbings, Walters, and Wolf 

Adjunct Professor Low 

Associate Professors Dunning, Few, and Talbot 

Adjunct Associate Professor Rundel 

Assistant Professors Dufour, Hill, and Reiff 



Degrees Offered: B.A. in Physics with space physics and astronomy option, 
M.S.. Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. There is no undergraduate major in the de- 
partment: however, the Physics Department offers a space physics and 
astronomy option leading to a B.A. with a major in physics for students with an 
interest in studies directed toward space physics and astronomy. The course 
requirements for this option can be satisfied in any order consistent with 
prerequisities. The following is a typical program (laboratory courses in 
parentheses): 



256 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Freshman: Physics 101, 102 or 111, 112 (132) 

Mathematics 101, 102 
Chemistry 101, 102, (107) 
Sophomore: Space Physics and Astronomy 251, 252, (261, 262) 

Physics 201, 202 or 211, 212 (231) 
Mathematics 211, 212 
Junior: Physics 301, 302 (331, 332) 

Physics 311, 312 

Mathematics or Mathematical Sciences elective (300 
or above) 
Senior: Space Physics and Astronomy 471 or 472 (431, 432) 

Physics 425 
Math elective 

Additional courses in space physics, electrical engineering:, mathematics, 
computer science, geology, and other subjects may be of use to undergraduate 
majors. The department has prepared a list of such courses, and should be 
consulted prior to registration. In addition to the departmental requirements for 
the major, students must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete 
no fewer than 60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a 
total program of at least 140 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and 
Majors, pages 50 and 51. 

Graduate Program. Research opportunities exist for graduate studies 
leading to degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the Depart- 
ment of Space Physics and Astronomy. To gain such a degree a student must be 
knowledgeable in many areas of space physics and astronomy and expert in at 
least one. 

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the department's activities, 
holders of bachelor's degrees in astronomy, chemistry, electrical engineering, 
geophysics, physics, or any of several other scientific and engineering disci- 
plines may apply for admission to graduate work in the department. Research 
programs in the Department of Space Physics and Astronomy include as- 
trophysics, atmospheric electricity, atomic physics, fields and particles, 
meteoritics, planetary structure, and planetary atmospheres. 

The requirements for M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are outlined below. A 
booklet giving more detailed and specific information is available from the 
departmental office. 

Degree of Master of Science. Candidates for the master's degree must 
complete successfully at least thirty semester hours of approved graduate 
level studies and must demonstrate an understanding of physics and astron- 
omy in an oral examination by their faculty committee. They must prepare a 
written thesis on an original research topic and defend the thesis orally. 

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The basic requirement for a Ph.D. is 
demonstration of the capacity for independent, original research. Additional 
formal requirements are indicated below. 

A student is normally admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree by 
satisfying the requirements for the M.S. degree in space physics and as- 
tronomy as outlined above. 

Candidates who hold a master's degree could possibly complete require- 
ments for the doctorate in two years; however, a minimum of three years' 
graduate study is normally required. Students must complete at least sixty 
semester hours of approved graduate level studies, prepare a thesis on an 



SPACE PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 257 

original research topic, and defend the thesis orally. The thesis must be of 
quality acceptable for publication in a reputable scientific journal. Further 
details of research programs in space physics and astronomy and departmen- 
tal degree requirements are contained in a pamphlet available on request from 

the Department of Space Physics and Astronomy. 

t 
Space Physics and Astronomy Courses t 

241a,b; 242b. Astronomy: Exploring the Universe (3-0-3 seach semester). 
A self-paced introductory course intended for students in academic programs. Ms. Reiff 

251a, 252b. Introduction to Space Physics and Astronomy (3-0-3 each 

semester). 

Introductory course recommended for science-engineei-ing majors. Concurrent registrat- 
ion in Space Physics and Astronomy 261, 262 required. Mr. Dufour 

261a, 262b. Observational Astronomy Laboratory (0-3-1 each semester). 

Astronomical coordinates, telescopes, astrophotography, photometry, and spectroscopy. 

Corequisite: Space Physics and Astronomy 251, 252. Mr. Dufour 

301a. Space Colonies (3-0-3). 

Physics of the space environment, design and construction of large space structures, econ- 
omic justification (power generation, specialized manufacturing), and evolution of social and 
political framework. Mr. Desaler 

431a, 432b. Senior Research (0-6-2 each semester). 

For majors in the space physics and astronomy option. Staff 

433a, 434b. Honors Research I and II (0-9-3 each semester). 

Student pursues a research project, similar to Space Physics and Astronomy 431, 432, but 
in considerably greater depth. Departmental approval required. Staff 

443a. Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3-0-3).t 

Fundamentals of meteorology and climatology: radiation and energy balance, measure- 
ments, thermodynamics, clouds, weather systems, motions on small and global scales. Also 
offered as Environmental Science and Engineering 443 and Mechanical Engineering 477. 

Mr. Few 

444b. Atmospheric Dynamics (3-0-3).t 

Hydrodynamic equations of motion on a rotating planet solved for static, stable, perturbed, 
and unstable flows for meso-scale and macro-scale weather systems on the Earth and other 
planets. Also offered as Environmental Science and Engineering 444 and Mechanical Engi- 
neering 478. Mr. Few 

471a. Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (3-0-3). 

Observational and theoretical aspects of the generation of corpuscular, electromagnetic, 
and gravitational radiation in astronomical objects. Prerequisite: Space Physics and Astron- 
omy 251, 252, 262; Physics 301, 302, 311, and 312 or equivalent. Mr. Dufour 

472b. Solar System Physics (3-0-3). 

Solar-terrestrial relationships, planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres. 
Prerequisite: Space Physics and Astronomy 251, 252, 262; Physics 301, 302, 311, and 312 or 
equivalent. Mr. Anderson 

488b. Topics in Space Utilization and Industrialization (3-0-3). 

The utilization of space for industrial and advanced scientific purposes. Science/Engi- 
neering majors only; other majors should enroll in space Physics and Astronomy 301. 

Mr. Freeman 

495a, 496b. Science Teaching (3-0-3 each semester). 

Supervised teaching experience in the science classroom or laboratory. For under- 
graduates. Staff 

503a, 504b. Introduction to Plasma Astrophysics (3-0-3 each semester). 

Magnetohydrodynamics, particle drifts, electrical conductivities, waves, and instabilities. 
Emphasis on applications. Mr. Cloutier 



258 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

506. Advanced Plasma Physics (3-0-3).t 

The course will treat plasma waves and instabilities from the point of view of kinetic theory 
and the Vlasov equation. Prerequisite or corequisite: Space Physics and Astronomy 504. 

Mr. Wolf 

507a, 508b. Research Topics in Space Physics, Astronomy, and Atmo- 
spheric Physics (2-0-2 each semester). 
A presentation of current research programs in the department. Mr. Chamberlain 

511a. Planetary Atmospheres: Radiative Equilibrium (3-0-3). 

Physics and chemistry of the lower atmospheres of planets. Mr. Chamberlain 

512b. Planetary Atmospheres: Aeronomy (3-0-3). 

Physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Mr. Chamberlain 

515a. Advanced Classical Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, normal vibrations, rigid body motion, the trans- 
formation theory of dynamics, and the covariant formulation. Also offered as Physics 515. 

Mr. Lane 

521a, 522b. Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3 each semester). 

Also offered as Physics 521, 522. Mr. Huang 

531a, 532b. Electromagnetic Theory (3-0-3 each semester). 

Also offered as Physics 531, 532. Mr. Duck 

535. The Solar System (3-0-3).t 

Basic physical features of the solar system and the current theories that attempt to explain 
its origin and evolution. Mr. Freeman 

537. Cosmochemistry II (3-0-3).t 

Chemistry of interstellar media. Mr. Heijmann 

538b. Cosmochemistry I (3-0-3). 

Chemical evolution of the solar system. Mr Heijmann 

544b. Mathematical Methods in Space Physics (3-0-3). 

Selected mathematical techniques and methods useful in physics and space physics. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 301 and 302 or equivalent. Mathematical Sciences 440 recommended. Also 
offered as Mathematical Sciences 544. Mr. Hill 

545a, 546b. Cosmology (3-0-3 each semester). 

Structure and evolution of the universe. Mr. Wolf 

551. Stellar Evolution and Nuclear Astrophysics (3-0-3).t 

Physical principles governing structure and evolution of stars. Mr. Talbot 

552. Stellar and Galactic Evolution (3-0-3).t 

Application of Space Physics and Astronomy 551 to stellar and galactic evolution. 

Mr. Talbot 

555, 556. Radiation Theory and High Energy Astrophysics (3-0-3 each 

semester).t 
591a, 592b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). Staff 

595a, 596b. Teaching Space Physics and Astronomy (Credit variable). 

For graduate students. Staff 

603a, 604b. Special Topics in Space Physics and Astronomy (3-0-3 each 

semester). 

Current topics including modern developments in space physics and astronomy. Emphasis 
may vary from year to year. Mr. Freeman. Mr. Dufour 

611a, 612b. Special Topics in Ionospheric Physics (3-0-3 each semester). 

Current research in ionospheric physics, with emphasis on experimental studies. 

Mr. Gordon 



SPACE PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 259 

615. Experimental Methods of Space Physics and Astronomy (3-0-3).t 

660. Gravitation and Relativity (3-0-3).t 

Theories of gravitation with emphasis on the Genera! Theory of Relativity and cosmological 
applications. Prerequisite: Physics 415 or equivalent. Also offered as Physics 660.M/-. Clayton 

700c. Summer Graduate Research (0-0-6). Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. Staff 



Spanish, Portuguese, and Classics 



Associate Professor Urrutibeheity, Chairman 

Professors Castaneda and Levin 

Associate Professors Boorman, Leal de Martinez, and Wallace 

Assistant Professor Callahan 

Instructors Cameron and Kauffmann 

Lecturers Daichman, Eaker, and Kiperman 

Degrees Offered: B.A. and M.A. in Spanish; B.A. in Classics 

Study is offered in classics, Greek, Latin, Portuguese, and Spanish. A fully 
equipped language laboratory is in operation. Laboratory work is required of 
students in the beginning classes of all modern languages. 

Qualified upperclass students may engage in independent work at the 
discretion of the department. 

Spanish 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major in Spanish. A student 
majoring in Spanish may pursue the following options: (1) language, (2) litera- 
ture, or (3) Latin American studies. For an option in language or literature, 
thirty semester hours (ten courses) offered in fulfillment of major requirements 
must be Spanish courses numbered 300 or higher. For an option in Latin 
American studies, a minimum of eighteen semester hours (six courses) in 
Spanish numbered 300 or higher must be taken, plus six semester hours (two 
courses) of Portuguese, and at least twelve semester hours (four courses) related 
to the Latin American field in other departments. Qualified upperclass students 
are offered an opportunity to earn up to six semester hours in independent work. 
For specific requirements as to courses and the sequence to be followed, see the 
departmental advisers. All majors must have their programs approved by the 
department. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 
50 and 5L 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in Spanish: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department; 
normally this will include twenty-four semester hours in advanced courses 
plus six semester hours of thesis work 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign language 
other than Spanish approved by the department 



260 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

3. Satisfactory performance on a written comprehensive examination in 
Spanish, which will test the student's mastery of the chosen area of speciali- 
zation and general competence in the remaining areas of Hispanic literature 
and linguistics 

4. One semester of college Latin or equivalent 

5. Completion of an acceptable thesis 

6. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis 

Summer Graduate and Undergraduate Program. Each summer since 
1973 the Department of Spanish has offered programs designed to prepare 
students to study the Spanish language and do research on Spanish and Latin 
American study projects. These programs have been held in Argentina, Spain 
and Mexico. Beginning this year the Summer Program of Hispanic Studies will 
be held in three cities in Spain: Seville, Madrid, and San Sebastian. 



Spanish Courses 

101a, 102b. First- Year Spanish (3-2-4 each semester). 

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language with emphasis on the development of 
audio-lingual skills. Language laboratory work required. Staff 

103a. Accelerated Beginning Spanish (6-2-6). 

Double course comparable to Spanish 101 and 102, designed to achieve in one semester 
maximum proficiency in spoken language. Five classes a week, language lab twice a week. 

Mr. Urrutibeheity, Staff 

201a, 202b. Second- Year Spanish (3-0-3 each semester). 

Contemporary short stories will provide current linguistic models and serve as the point of 
departure for class conversation and discussion. Staff 

204b. Accelerated Intermediate Spanish (6-2-6). 

A continuation of Spanish 103 comparable to Spanish 201, 202. Contemporary short stories 
will provide current linguistic models and serve as the point of departure for class conversation 
and discussion. Mr. Urrutibeheity, Staff 

303a. Spanish Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 

Selected works of outstanding Spanish writers. Readings and class discussion in English. 
Open to all students. Does not count toward a major in Spanish. Mr. Casta^feda 

304b. Spanish American Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 

Selected works of outstanding contemporary Latin American writers. Readings and class 
discussion in English. Open to all students. Does not count toward a major in Spanish. 

Mr.s. Boor man 

311a, 312b. Advanced Spanish (3-0-3 each semester). 

Third-year course designed primarily to improve spoken language. Emphasis on new 
vocabulary and idioms, morphology, syntax, and mechanisms of interference. Staff 

315a. Spanish Phonetics (3-0-3). 

Spanish phonetics including major dialectical variants. Specific emphasis on analysis of 
the most frequent types of English interference. Active practice in pronunciation and intonation. 

Mrs. Boor man 

316. Advanced Spanish Syntax and Composition (3-0-3). t 

A detailed study of Spanish syntax with special attention to the interference caused by 
structural differences between English and Spanish. Mr. Urrutibeheity 

319a, 320b. Survey of Spanish Literature (3-0-3 each semester). 

The history of Spanish literature through representative readings from the medieval period 
to the present. Emphasis on stylistic analysis. Formerly offered as Spanish ,301, 302. 

Mr it. Leal de Martinez. Mr. Cameron 

321a, 322b. Survey of Spanish American Literature (3-0-3 each semester). 
The main trends and outstanding writers of Spanish America. Offered alternate years. 

Mrs. Callahan, Mrs. Boorman 



SPANISH, PORTUGUESE, AND CLASSICS 261 

323a. Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3-0-3). 

Topics relating to the development of social, political, and economic institutions of Spain will 
form the basis for extensive conversation, discussion and composition. Mr. Kauffnmnn 

324b. The Culture and Civilization of Latin America (3-0-3). 

The development of social, political, and economic institutions of Latin America forms j;he 
basis for extensive conversation, discussion, and composition. Mrs. Leal de Martinez 

341, 342. Spanish Literature From 1800 to the Present (3-0-3 each semester).! 

Mr.s'. Leal de Martinez 

361a, 362b. Golden Age of Drama (3-0-3 each semester). 

Development of the "comedia," illustrated by selected works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de 
Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon, Calderon de la Barca, and other seventeenth-century playwrights. 
Offered alternate years. Mr. Castarieda 

381, 382. Prose and Lyric Poetry of the Golden Age (3-0-3 each semester).t 
Analysis of poetry and prose emphasizing mysticism, the development of lyric poetry from 
Garcilaso to Gongora, the picaresque novel, and Cervantes. Offered in alternate years. 

Mr. Castaneda 

402. Introduction to Semiotics (3-0-3).t 

Study of literary texts (rhetoric, poetics, and narrative theory); semiotics as a framework for 
social science studies. Readings and lectures in English; some readings in Spanish for majors. 
No prerequisites. Mr. Kauffmann 

405, 406. Spanish American Literature (3-0-3 each semester).! Mrs. Boorman 

411, 412. Medieval and Renaissance Spanish Literature (3-0-3 each 

semester).! Mrs. Leal de Martinez 

415a, 416b. The Art and Mechanics of Translation (2-2-3 each semester). 
Intensive practice in Spanish-English. English-Spanish translation. Introduction to the 
techniques of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Lab work required. Prerequisite: 
311, 312 or equivalent. Staff 

421a, 422b. Independent Work: Special Topics (0-0-3 each semester). 

Hispanic literature. Hispanic linguistics, and Hispanic culture and civilization. Reserved 
for qualified upperclassmen who are particularly interested in a topic not covered in other 
courses. Permission of the department required. Staff 

501a, 502b. Research and Thesis (0-0-3 each semester). Staff 

507a. Teaching College Spanish (1-0-1). 

Teaching methods and techniques, preparation of tests, and evaluation. One hour per week of 
discussion. Students observe language class one week, teach three weeks. Required for graduate 
students. Mr. Urrutiheheity 

511a. Methods of Research in Hispanic Literature (3-0-3). 

Theoretical and practical course for beginning graduate students. Emphasis on techniques 
of stylistic and linguistic analysis, and on the bibliographical resources of the field. Staff 

512. Methods of Research in Hispanic Literature (3-0-3).t 

Continuation of Spanish 511. Staff 

515a. Studies in Hispanic Linguistics (3-0-3). 

Topics: history of the Spanish language. Old Spanish, applied Spanish linguistics, and 
Spanish American dialectology. Mr. Urndibe'heity 

516. Studies in Hispanic Linguistics (3-0-3). f Mr. Urrutiheheity 

517. Studies in Medieval Spanish Literature (3-0-3).t Mrs. Leal de MaHinez 

518b. Studies in Medieval Spanish Literature (3-0-3). 

Topic: La Celestina Mrs. Leal de Martinez 

523, 524. Studies in Golden Age Theatre (3-0-3 each semester).! M/-. Castdneda 

525, 526. Studies in Spanish Golden Age Prose and Lyric Poetry (3-0-3 each 

semester).! Mr. Castdneda 



262 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

535a. Studies in the Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3-0-3). 

Topic: Poetry, drama and ideology of the early nineteenth century. Mr. Cameron 

536. Studies in the Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3-0-3).t 

Staff 

541. Studies in the Spanish Literature of the Twentieth Century (3-0-3).t 

Staff 

542b. Studies in the Spanish Literature of the Twentieth Century (3-0-3). 

Topic; Spanish Modernism. Mr. Kauffmann 

555a. Studies in Spanish American Literature from the Colonial Period to 
the Present Day (3-0-3). 

Topic: Contemporary Latin American drama. Mrt^. Boorman 

556. Studies in Spanish American Literature from the Colonial Period to 
the Present Day (3-0-3).t Mr^. Boorman 

566. Studies in the Culture and Civilization of Spain and Latin America 

(3-0-3).t Staff 

575. Introduction to Romance Linguistics (3-0-3).t 

The development of the Romance languages from Vulgar Latin and the creation of Romance 
standards. Mr. Urrutibeheity 

576. Introduction to Romance Linguistics (3-0-3).t Mr. Urrutibeheity 

591a, 592b. Independent Study: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature, 
Hispanic Linguistics, and Hispanic Culture and Civilization (0-0-3 each 

semester). staff 

700c. Summer Graduate Research. Staff 

800b. Degree Candidate Only. 

Portuguese Courses 

101a, 102b. First Year Portuguese (3-2-4 each semester). 

Introduction to the study of the Portuguese language with emphasis on development of audio- 
lingual skills. Language laboratory work required. Afr.s. Boorman, Mrs. Leal de Martinez 

201, 202. Second-Year Portuguese (3-0-3 each semester).t 

311, 312. Advanced Portuguese (3-0-3 each semester).t 

400b. Independent Study: Special Topics in Luso-Brazilian Literature and 

Linguistics (0-0-3). 

Reserved for qualified students particularly interested in a topic not covered in other 
courses. Permission of the department required. Staff 



Classics 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major in Classical Studies. A 

major in classical studies is presently offered with the cooperation of the depart- 
ments of History and Fine Arts. The overall major requirement is distributed 
between classical languages and literature, at least thirty semester hours (ten 
courses) of which eighteen semester hours (six courses) must be at the 300 level 
or above, and relevant courses in fine arts, history, humanities, and philosophy. 
Preparation to insure an adequate reading and speaking knowledge of at least 
one modern foreign language is very strongly urged. All prospective programs 
for individuals majoring in classical studies are to be drawn up in consultation 
with the members of the classics staff. 



SPANISH, PORTUGUESE, AND CLASSICS 263 

Classics Courses 

211a. Classical Civilization: Greece (3-0-3). 

A introductory survey of the various aspects of ancient Greek culture, including political 
and social history, art and architecture, religion, philosophy, and literature. No prerequisites. 

M/-.S'. Eaker 

212b. Classical Civilization: Rome (3-0-3). 

An introductory survey of the various aspects of Roman civilization, including the rise of 
Christianity; political and social history, art and architecture, religion, philosophy, and litera- 
ture. No prerequisites. Mrs-. Wallace 

214b. Greek and Latin Elements in English (3-0-3). 

The relationship of English to the classical languages; a systematic guide to understanding 
of vocabulary and an example of historical and cultural development. No prerequisites. 

Mrs. Eaker 

335a, 336b. Classical Mythology (3-0-3 each semester). 

Survey of Greek myths with their extension to Rome and to modern European literature. All 
works will be read in English translation. No prerequisites. Mr. Levin 

412. Roman Historians (3-0-3).t 

Study of Roman historiography, with emphasis upon Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus, including 
comparison with Greek historians and with the ancient biographical tradition. Prerequisite: 
Classics 21 1 or 212, or History 201 or 202, or permission of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 
Also offered as Latin 412. 



Greek Courses 

101a, 102b. First Year Greek (3-0-3 each semester). 

Designed to develop as rapidly as possible an ability to read simple Greek prose. Study of 
grammar, forms, and vocabulary combined with practice in reading. Mr.s-. Eaker 

201a, 202b. Intermediate Greek: Classical (3-0-3 each semester). 

Designed to broaden previously acquired skills through close study of readings which may 
include a dialogue of Plato, a tragedy, or selections from Homer. Prerequisite: Greek 101, 102 or 
equivalent. Staff 

211. Intermediate Greek: New Testament (3-0-3).t 

Experience and facility in reading New Testament Greek. The Gospel of Mark and selected 
letters of Paul will be read. Prerequisite: Greek 101, 102, or equivalent. Mm. Eaker 

491a, 492b. Special Topics in Greek Literature (0-0-3 each semester). 

Independent work for qualified upperclassmen in genres or authors not presented in other 
upper-level courses; may be repeated for credit. If Greek 301. 302 is notgiven, students who wish 
to study Greek beyond the 200 level should register for this course. Staff 



Latin Courses 

101a. First Year Latin (3-0-3). 

The fundamentals of Latin grammar with emphasis on acquisition of reading skill. Open to 
students with no previous study of Latin or who need a refresher course. Mrs. Eaker 

102b. First Year Latin (3-0-3). 

A first reading course in Latin. Selections of prose and poetry from the Classical and 
Medieval periods will be read. Afr.s. Wallace 

201a. Intermediate Latin (3-0-3). 

Rapid review of forms and syntax followed by readingof representative prose selections. For 
students who enter with two or three years of high school Latin or who have successfully com- 
pleted Latin 101, 102. Staff 

301a. Catullus and Horace (3-0-3). 

Selected lyric poems of both authors will be studied. Prerequisite: same as for Latin 301. 

Mrs. Wallace 



264 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

302b. Plautus and Terence (3-0-3). 

Study of selected comedies. Consideration will be given to the position of both authors in 
ancient comic tradition. Prerequisite: Latin 201, 202, or three or four years of high school Latin. 

Mr. Levin 

411. Literature of the Late Republic (3-0-3).t Mr. Levin 

412. Roman Historians (3-0-3).t Mrs. Wallace 

421a. Vergil (3-0-3). 

Study of the poet's works (Bucolics, Georgics, Aeneid), with special emphasis on ihe Aeneid. 
Offered in alternate years. Mr. Levin 

422b. Ovid (3-0-3). 

Study of selections of the major works, both epic and elegiac, with special emphasis on the 
Metamorphoses. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Levin 

491a, 492b. Special Topics in Roman Literature (0-0-3 each semester). 

Independent work for qualified upperclassmen in genres or authors not presented in other 
upper-level courses: may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Latin 301, 302 or equivalent. Staff 



Inde 



X 



Academic calendar, inside front 

cover 
Academic curricula, 49-58 
Academic probation, 63 
Academic regulations, 60-65 
Academic suspension, 63-64 
Accounting, 93, 104-107 
Accounts, delinquent, 74 
Administration, 104, 105, 108-109 
Administration, Jesse H. Jones 

Graduate School of, 104-109 
Administrative offices, 6 
Admission, graduate, 96-97 

high school, special, 71 

undergraduate, 65, 69 
Advanced degree 

requirements, 89-95 
Advanced placement, 69 
Aerospace engineering, see 

Mechanical Engineering 
Anthropology, 110-114 
Apprenticeship plan for student 

teachers, 148 
Architecture, 51, 93, 114-123 
Area major, 56 
Army Reserve Officers' Training 

Corps, 220-221 
Art and Art History, 123-129 
Assistantships, graduate, see 

fellowships 
Associates, Corporate, 10 
Associates, Rice University, 7 
Astronomy, Space Physics and, 

255-259 
Athletic Department staff, 41 
Athletics, Intercollegiate, 87 
Auditing, 71 

Automobile regulations, 87 
Awards, graduate, 98-99 

Student Association, 84 

undergraduate, 77-82 
Baylor College of Medicine, joint 

graduate programs, 95 
Behavioral Science, 129-130 
Biochemistry, 130-132 
Bioengineering, 90, 162 



1 



Biology, 132-137 
Biophysics, 236 
Board and room, 74 
Board of Governors, 5 
Bond, guaranty, 73 
Brown, George R. School of 

Engineering, 54, 150-177 
Calendar, academic, inside front 

cover 
Campus, 1 
Campus map, 2-3 
Candidacy, approval of, 91 
Certification, teacher, 58, 146-148 

fees, 74 
Chairs, endowed, 45 
Change of curriculum, 56, 61, 62 
Chapel, Memorial, 86 
Chemical Engineering, 152-155 
Chemical physics, 237 
Chemistry, 137-141 
Circuits, control, and 

Communications systems, 162-164 
Civil Engineering, 156-160 
Class III students, 71, 97 
Classics, courses, 262-263 
C.L.E.P., 69 
College Board tests, 69 
College courses, 84 
College masters, 6, 83 
Colleges, residential, 71, 83 
Committees, University Standing, 42 
Computer Science and 

Engineering, 164 
Computer science, undergraduate 

option, 54 
Computer Services, Institute for, 

staff, 40 
Contents, iii 

Corporate Associates, 10 
Course programs, undergraduate, 

49-59, 61 
Courses, credit, 50, 103 

deficiency, 61 

dropping, 60 

numbering, 103 

requirements, 50-51 



266 INDEX 



Courses of instruction, 103-264 
Credit, course, 50, 103 
Curricula, overview, 52-53 
Curricula, undergraduate, 49-57 
Curriculum changes, 56, 61, 62 
Deficiencies, removal of course, 61 
Degree plan, approval of, 62 
Degrees, graduate, 89-95 

professional, 92-95 

requirements for, 49-51 

research, 89-92 

undergraduate, 49-57 

with honors, 51, 65 
Delinquent accounts, 74 
Delta Phi Alpha, 82 
Distribution requirements, 50 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees, 91 
Dormitories, see residential colleges 
Double majors, 56 
Dropping a course, 60 
Early decision admission, 67 
Economics, 141-146 
Education, 93-94, 146-150 

teacher certification, 58, 146-148 
Electrical Engineering, 160-167 
Emeritus faculty, 11 
Employment, student, 76 
Engineering, 54, 94, 150-177 

See also Chemical, Civil, Electrical, 
Environmental, and Mechanical 
Engineering 
Engineering, professional degrees 

in, 94-95 
English, 177-182 
Entrance examinations, 66-67 
Entrance requirements, 66-67 

graduate, 96-97 

undergraduate, 65 
Environmental Science and 

Engineering, 168-171 
Examinations, course, 62 

entrance, 66 

final, 62 
Exchange programs, 59 
Expenses, graduate, 97-98 

undergraduate, 73, 74 
Faculty, 12-37 
Faculty, emeritus, 11 
Fees, graduate, 97-98 

undergraduate, 73 
Fellowships, graduate, 98-100 
Film and Photography, 128 
Financial Aid, 75-76, 100 
Fine Arts, see Art and Art History 



Fondren Library, 86, 101 
Foreign languages, see Classics, 

French, German, Greek, 

Italian, Latin, Portuguese, 

Russian, Spanish 
French, 182-186 
Geography courses, 191 
Geology, 186-191 
Geophysics option, 236 
German, 192-196 
Government, student, 84, 101 
Governors, Board of, 5 
Grade symbols, 62 
Graduate admission, 96-97 
Graduate approval of candidacy, 91 
Graduate areas of study, 89 
Graduate assistantships, see 

fellowships 
Graduate Council, 101 
Graduate degrees, 89 

requirements, 89-95 
Graduate fees, 97-98 
Graduate fellowships, 98-99 
Graduate language requirements, 91 
Graduate oral examinations, 92 
Graduage program in history and law 

with UH and TSU, 96 
Graduate program with Baylor 

College of Medicine, 95 
Graduate Record Exam, 97 
Graduate scholarships, 99-100 
Graduate Student Association, 101 
Graduate student government, 101 
Graduate thesis regulations and 

procedure, 92 
Graduation, 65 
Greek, 263 
Guaranty bond, 73 
Health and Physical Education, 

197-200 
Health Service, 85-86 
Health Service staff, 40 
High school students, special 

admission, 71 
History, 200-206 
History of Art, 125-127 
Honor Council, 83 
Honor Roll, President's, 63 
Honor societies, 82 
Honor system, 83 
Honors, graduate, 98-99 

undergraduate, 77-82 
Honors, graduation with, 65 
Honors programs, 51 



INDEX 267 



Housing, graduate students, 101 
Housing, undergraduate, 71, 83 
Humanities and Social Sciences 

Division, 54 
Incomplete, course grade of, 62-63 
Institute for the Arts, 124 
Institute for Computer Services and 

Applications staff, 40 
Instructional staff, 12-37 
Intercollegiate athletics, 87 
Interim decision plan, 68 
Internship plan for student teachers, 

148 
Interview for admission, 67 
Intramural sports, 87 
Italian, 186 
Jones, Jesse H., Graduate School of 

Administration, 93, 104-109 
Language requirements, graduate, 91 
Languages, foreign, see Classics, 

French, German, Greek, 

Italian, Latin, Portuguese, 

Russian, and Spanish 
Lasers, microwaves, and solid-state 

electronics, 166 
Latin, 263 

Law, joint graduate program, 96 
Leave of absence, 64 
Lectureships, see Chairs 
Legal Studies Program, 55, 206-207 
Library, Fondren, 86, 101 
Library, professional staff, 38 
Linguistics, 207-208 
Literary societies, 85 
Living expenses, 74 
Loans, student, 76, 100 
Major, approval of, 62 

area, 56-57 

double, 56 

interdepartmental, 56 
Majors offered, 49-57 
Management degrees, 93, 104 
Managerial studies, 55, 104, 109 
Marine Corps, NROTC. 231-232 
Masters of residential colleges, 6, 83 
Master's degrees, see individual 

departments 
Materials Science, 90, 175-177 
Mathematical Sciences, 95, 208-216 
Mathematics, 216-220 
Mechanical Engineering, 171-175 
Memorial Center facilities, 86 
Mentor Recognition Award, 84 
Military Sciences. 58. 220-221 



Music courses, 222-230 
Music, Shepherd School of, 

56, 95, 222-230 
Naval Science, 58, 230-232 
Nuclear energy, option in, 236 
Numbering, course, 103 
Offices, administrative, 6 
Oral examinations, graduate, 92 
Organizations, student. 85 
Parking, 87 
Pass-fail option, 62 
Phi Beta Kappa, 82 
Phi Lambda Upsilon, 82 
Philosophy, 232-235 
Photography, film and, 128 
Physical Education, see Health and 

Physical Education 
Physics, 235-239 
Pi Delta Phi, 82 
Placement Office. 87 
Political Science, 239-244 
Portuguese, 262 
Preceptors, Architecture, 114-115 

Civil Engineering. 156 
Predentistry, 57 
Prelaw, 58 
Premedicine, 57 
Preprofessional degrees, 57-58 
President's Honor Roll, 63 
Probation, academic, 63 
Professional degrees, 92-95 
Professional research staff, 37 
Professorships, 45 

Programs, undergraduate, 49-59. 61 
Psychiatric Service, 86 
Psychology. 245-247 
Readmission. 64 
Refund of fees and tuition, 74 
Registration, 60 
Regular decision plan, 68 
Regulations, academic, 60-65 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 76 
Reinstatement fee. 60 
Religious Studies. 248-251 
Removal of course deficiencies, 61 
Requirements, course, 50, 51 

distribution, 50 

skills, 50 
Research degrees, 89-92 
Research staff, professional, 37 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 58. 

220, 230 
Residential colleges, 71. 83 
Responsibility, student. 82. 100 



268 INDEX 



Rice Center for Community Design 

and Research, 118 
Rice Memorial Center, 86 
Rice Players, 85, 128-129 
Rice Service Award, 84 
Rice University Associates, 7 
Rice University Corporate 

Associates, 10 
Rice University Standing 

Committees, 42 
Russian courses, 196-197 
Sciences, curricula, 52, 56 
Scholarships, graduate, 99-100 
Scholarships, undergraduate, 77-82 
Senate, student, 84 
Sewall Art Galery, 124 
Shepherd School of Music, 56, 95, 

222-230 
Sigma Delta Pi, 82 
Sigma Tau, 82 
Sigma Xi, 82 
Skills requirement, 50 
Social Sciences curricula, 54 
Sociology, 252-255 
Space Physics and Astronomy, 

255-259 
Spanish, 259-262 
Special academic probation, 63 
Special charges, 73 
Sports, intramural, 87 
Staff, administrative, 5, 6 

Athletic Department, 41 

Health Service, 40 

Institute for Computer Services 
and Applications, 40 

instructional and research, 12-37 

library, 38 

professional research, 37 
Standing Committees, 42 
Student activities, 85 
Student Association, 84 
Student Association Service Award, 84 
Student Center, 86 
Student employment, 76 
Student government, 84 
Student Health Service, 85-86 
Student housing, undergraduate, 71, 83 
Student life, 82-87 
Student loans, 76 
Student organizations, 85 
Student responsibility, 82 
Student Senate, 84 
Student teaching internship, 148 
Studio art, 127-128 



Summer school, transfer credit, 61 

Suspension, academic, 63-64 

Swarthmore exchange program, 59 

Systems theory, 90 

Tau Beta Pi, 82 

Tau Sigma Delta, 82 

Teacher certification, 58, 146-148 

fees, 74 
Theater, 128-129 

Thesis regulations and procedure, 92 
Transcripts, 74 
Transfer students, 61, 70 

admission of, 70 

credit, 61 
Trinity College (Cambridge) 

exchange program, 59 
Trustees, 5 

TSU cooperative program, 59 
Tuition, graduate, 97-98 
Tuition grants, graduate, 99-100 
Tuition refund, 74 
Tuition, undergraduate, 73 
Tutorial program, 65 
Undergraduate admission, 65, 69 
Undergraduate approval of 

majors, 62 
Undergraduate curricula, 49-57 
Undergraduate fees, 71 
Undergraduate living expenses, 74 
Undergraduate scholarships, 77-82 
University Associates, 7 
University Campus and facilities, 1-3 
University Standing Committees, 42 
Visiting students, 70 
Vocational rehabilitation, 76 
Williams College exchange 

program, 60 
Withdrawal, voluntary, 64 



Cover art by Michael Ytterberg. Photography by Charles Ford, 
Frank Grizzaffi, and Wiley Sanders. 



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